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Akiba Rubinstein vs Georg Salwe
"The Backward Pawn" (game of the day Aug-20-2018)
Lodz (1908), Lodz RUE, rd 3, Oct-??
Tarrasch Defense: Prague Variation (D33)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 58 times; par: 67 [what's this?]

Annotations by Emanuel Lasker.      [80 more games annotated by Lasker]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-09-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: You said it well <tamar>; this game gives more than the opening moves--it is the strategic paradigm for the whole theme.
Apr-02-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eric Schiller: This is a good example of how NOT to play the Tarrasch as Black!
Jun-23-05  mynameisrandy: Wow, with the notes this game is a <very> instructive example of how to exploit a positional weakness.
Nov-30-05  KingG: I think this is one of the most instructive games ever played.
Feb-16-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Octavia: Chernev explains the game in detail in LOGICAL CHESS, pp 124
Apr-05-08  Octal: The Chernev explanation gave me a slightly better understanding of Nimzovich's blockade. Blockade your opponents pawn center (with preferably a knight or a bishop), and you opponent will struggle to centralize their pieces and gain space, while you will be constantly be pushing them back, obtaining more space, and make all of your pieces more centralized.
Sep-11-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  mjmorri: The Tarrasch was pretty much out of business until Spassky revitalized it during his 1969 match against Petrosian.

Still, it is difficult to play.

Nov-10-09  badenbaden: ¡Maravillosa sinfonía posicional!
Mar-01-13  WiseWizard: Beautiful positional play, no counter play, a dream game for a positional player.
May-29-13  Karpova: Leopold Hoffer: <A perfect model game. After all Salwe made only one weak move; and this was sufficient for Rubinstein to evolve a plan which he consistently pursued right to the end.>

From page 251 of the 1908 'American Chess Bulletin'

Nov-11-13  sorrowstealer: I agree, one of the most instructive annotation and game .
Dec-16-13  Howard: That "American Chess Bulletin" comment was also printed in Volume 1 of Donaldson and Minev's two-volume work on Rubenstein.

Chervev's Logical Chess Move by Move does indeed (as mentioned above) analyze this game thoroughly

The former book states that 3-4 of Rubinstein's moves could only have been made by an exceptionally deep strategist. Two of those moves, in fact, are when he played Pf3 followed a few moves later by Rf2. Those two moves look rather amateurish at first glance, but they're not---not by a long shot !

Apr-13-15  cunctatorg: This very game at least deserves to become GOTD; it's one of the best demonstrations of the positional chess...
Aug-16-15  DarthStapler: "The c-file is important because open", huh? Great grammar
Oct-07-16  vasja: 29. Rxa6!
Oct-12-16  Jimmy720: Attacking weaknesses!
May-12-17  User not found: I know Black's just clinging on at this point but moving the queen from behind whites c7R and d6Q is the only option..


click for larger view

With accurately play the <worst> white could do is come out a Bishop up and a clear path to blacks a pawn, but blunders happen in complicated positions. Worth a shot, lol :)


click for larger view

Much more like a modern game than Rubinstein's other 'Notable games'. More accurate and engine like precision, less mistakes, blunders, inaccuracies etc etc :)

Aug-20-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: "a fly in the ointment."
Aug-20-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: In some ways this game is more beautiful than his wonderful win against Rotlewi. He avoids e4 as it he wants to keep the pawns as static as possible and f3 then he has the plan of getting the B to f1. Great game which I am sure I have played in strategy books but such games you can never see enough.
Dec-24-18  Count von Twothree: This is a classic example of “one player plays, the other applauds”. 14.f3 weakens the e-file, so one obvious plan for Black would be to double on it. White would then have to ditch his plan, because to plough on regardless would give no advantage. Ploughing on would look something like: 14...Bf5 15.Bc5 Rfe8 16.Rf2 Nd7 17.Bxe7 Rxe7 18.Bf1 Qb7 19.Qd4 Rae8, and Black is OK.
Dec-24-18  sudoplatov: Interesting that Marshall used the g3 idea in the Tarrasch to defeat Rubinstein at Carlsbad (as it was then known) 1911.
Jan-01-20  crankykong: Stunning game. I foresaw the Qd4 idea but never even considered 16.Rf2. 20.e3 is a beautiful move that brings the whole strategy together.
May-08-20  sakredkow: A footnote: This game is given in Pachman's "Complete Chess Strategy Vol 2" as Rubinstein-Salve, Karlsbad 1911. The opening moves are given as 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c5 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Nf3 Nf6 (transcribed from descriptive notation). Okay, now I have to play through this!
May-08-20  cunctatorg: When I studied this game from the very first time, back at 1978 or 1979, I had been enchanted!!...
Nov-03-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  kingscrusher: Amazing backward pawn example :)
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