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Paul Saladin Leonhardt vs Jose Raul Capablanca
San Sebastian (1911), San Sebastian ESP, rd 6, Feb-28
Tarrasch Defense: Symmetrical Variation (D32)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Given 49 times; par: 122 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-05-05  azi: Capa performs black magic!! with the 2 bishops. How could he know so much? Its like he invented the game.
Jul-04-05  THE pawn: Greco would have been proud of him hehehe!
Dec-30-05  FENfiend: Yeah, this is a smart collection. Thanks, <refutor>.
Jan-13-06  Whitehat1963: Capa goes up a pawn and immediately seeks to exchange queens. He's like a python slowly but relentlessly squeezing the life out his opponent.
Mar-21-06  notyetagm: Very nice finish by Capa, 61 b8=♕ g2+!. Now White's king has only two legal moves to get out of check, 62 ♔f2 and 62 ♔e1.

62 ♔f2 is bad because it <self-interferes> with the White a7-bishop defending the g1-promotion square: 62 ♔f2 g1=♕+ 63 ♔xf3 ♕g3+ (<double attack>) and 64 ... ♗x♕, winning a whole queen.

But 62 ♔e1 also loses through the variation 62 ♔e1 ♗x♕ 63 ♗x♗+ ♔h1 64 ♗a7 g1=♕+ 65 ♗x♕ ♔x♗ and the f3-pawn promotes. In this line if White does not recapture with 63 ♗x♗+, then he is simply down by the connected passed f- and g-pawns for nothing, a trivial win for Capablanca.

Sep-19-07  InspiredByMorphy: 9.Qe2 is a gambit probably not worth playing... http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...
Apr-13-08  smarterthanbobby: brillant!
Oct-08-08  afterbirth: It's always tempting to immediately capture a promoted pawn, but its better to improve your position first by checking the king since you can always go back and capture the promoted queen. Sebastian was finished here regardless due to Capa's near flawless endgame execution after obtaining a slight material advantage. I wonder if he had to actually ponder his last series of moves or if it was all intuitive to his genius chess mind.
May-15-09  TheWizardfromHarlem: Bc6! a master stroke
Apr-20-10  mrmietus: <quote>Bc6! a master stroke</quote>

Don't think so, it's just a plan with b5.
Generaly, I consider Capalanca as a player who seems to be born to play chess - that game is just like designed for him. But for me, he didn't show special interest in studying so his games are brilliant mostly for his times. Today his play would not be succesful. That is why I consider Rubinstein as better player of that time to study, because Akiba was playing with great determination to find the best moves for the position, not just to search for movest that look good, as it looks like Capablanca did.

Apr-20-10  Boomie: <mrmietus:
Generaly, I consider Capalanca as a player who seems to be born to play chess - that game is just like designed for him. But for me, he didn't show special interest in studying so his games are brilliant mostly for his times. Today his play would not be succesful.>

You are assuming that Capa would bring yesterday's chess to today's table? Hardly seems likely. Morphy and Capa had the finest minds to ever play chess. That made them seem lazy. But they only had to see a game once to "own" it. They would have played over today's games and found new ideas and nuances that only a few of today's players understand.

What did the World Champions who knew him think?

"I have known many chess players, but only one chess genius, Capablanca." — Emanuel Lasker

"Capablanca's planning of the game is so full of that freshness of his genius for position play, that every hypermodern player can only envy him." — Alexander Alekhine

"I honestly feel very humble when I study Capablanca's games." — Max Euwe

"Capablanca didn’t make separate moves — he was creating a chess picture. Nobody could compare with him in this." — Mikhail Botvinnik

Oct-17-11  arnakor: I spent some hours on this ending, with the help of the computer (which is not always useful!).

If I'm not mistaking :
30.h4?! is dubious, white's chances are better by keeping the pawn on h2.

40...g4 almost wins, but doesn't.

42...c4? is a mistake from Capablanca, 42...g4 would have won.

44.♗g4?! is not the best. 44.b7 or even 44.♗b7 both seem to draw.

45.♗f3? is a bad move, 45.♗e2 must draw.

48...f3? is the second mistake of Capablanca whereas 48...♔g5 was winning.

54.♗d5? is the last mistake from Leonhardt, 54.♔f1! looks like it saves the game.

This endgame is fascinating...

Aug-09-15  jdhb2015: mrmietus: <quote>Bc6! a master stroke</quote> Don't think so, it's just a plan with b5.
Generaly, I consider Capalanca as a player who seems to be born to play chess - that game is just like designed for him. But for me, he didn't show special interest in studying so his games are brilliant mostly for his times. Today his play would not be succesful. That is why I consider Rubinstein as better player of that time to study, because Akiba was playing with great determination to find the best moves for the position, not just to search for movest that look good, as it looks like Capablanca did.

You are forgetting something, they were not studing chess just like you are rigth now, they were playing the strongest tournament of the moment, and perhaps the best move for the position was not the best move for the game. The most important thing is to win!!!! and in that Capablanca proved to be the best.

Jun-18-18  Omnipotent00001: 58...Kf4 mates in 23
May-23-20  pepechuy: Did Leonhardt play 56. Bd4?
I do not imply it is a bad move, I am asking a question. In the Encyclopedia of Chess Endings, volume 5, it appears 56. Bc5
May-23-20  sneaky pete: It's also 56.Bc5 .. in the (1982 Olms reprint of the) 1919 second revised and corrected edition of the tournament book by Mieses and Lewitt.

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