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Michael Adams vs Miikka Maki-Uuro
European Club Cup (2004), Cesme TUR, rd 1, Oct-03
Alekhine Defense: Modern. Larsen Variation Miles Line (B04)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-12-04  Knight13: 17. Bxh7+!; lots of people fall into this trap! But I think a 2740 beating a 2390 is no big deal with a quick defeat.
Oct-13-04  themindset: still, i can't believe that a 2390 would allow his pawn structure demolished like that. he was probably intimidated.
Oct-13-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Mate threat: 18 ♕h5+ ♔g7 19 ♕g4+ ♔h6 20 ♖d3 and 21 ♖h3#
Dec-16-04  fgh: Another proof that 4. ... exd5 is bad.
Sep-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Cheapo by the Dozen: The main line is

17 Bxh7+ Kxh7
18 Qh5+ Kg8/Kg7
19 Qg4+ Kh8/Kh7
20 Rd3

with the unstoppable threat of Rh3#.

If Black declines the sacrifice with ... Kh8, we could get

17 Bxh7+ Kh8
18 Qh5 Rg8
19 Bg6+ Kg7
20 Qh7+ Kf8
21 Qxf7#

and White wins easily.

Declining with 19 ... Kg7 just transposes into one of the other lines after 20 Qg4+.

Sep-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Cheapo by the Dozen: It turns out that 12 ... c5 needed to be prepared, perhaps with ... h6. It's tough to see how Black could have dealt with the d-file pressure after that move, given that the game line failed spectacularly.
Sep-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has a bishop and a knight for the bishop pair.

The weakened black castle invites to play 17.Bxh7+, paving the way for the heavy pieces:

A) 17... Kxh7 18.Qh5+ Kg7 19.Qg4+

A.1) 19... Kh6 20.Rd3 Bxf2+ 21.Rxf2 Qc5 22.Rh3+ Qh5 23.Rxh5#.

A.2) 19... Kh7 20.Rd3 Be3 21.Rxe3 Qxe3 22.fxe3 Rg8 23.Qh4+ wins [Q+N+P vs R+B].

B) 17... Kh8 18.Qh5

B.1) 18... Rfd8 19.Bg6+ Kg7(8) 20.Qh7+ Kf8 21.Qxf7#.

B.2) 18... Kg7 19.Qg4+

B.2.a) 19... Kh6 20.Rd3 wins as in A.1.

B.2.b) 19... Kxh7 20.Rd3 transposes to A.

B.2.c) 19... Kh8 20.Rd3 Rg8 21.Bxg8 Rxg8 22.Rh3#.

C) 17... Kg7 18.Qg4+ transposes to B.2.

Sep-02-14  SamAtoms1980: Go Greek or go home.
Sep-02-14  diagonalley: easy squeezy
Sep-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  cocker: This combination started a move earlier with 16 Bxf6. It is vital for White to play 19 Qg4+ to trap the king on the h-file.
Sep-02-14  stacase: Old as the hills.
Sep-02-14  patzer2: Immediately sensed the solution to this Tuesday puzzle was 17. Bxh7+!, followed by a Queen check on h5 and a Rook lift to d3.

However it's a bit more complicated than that, especially if Black responds to 17. Bxh7+! with 17...Kh8.

For example after 17. Bxh7+ Kh8 18. Qh5 Kg7 (position below),


click for larger view

19. Rd3? is a mistake, because 19. Rd3? Rh8! allows Black counter chances after 20. Rg3+ Kf8 21. Qh6+ Ke7 22. Rg7 Raf8 .

Instead White here (diagram above) should play 19. Qg4+!, and only then play the Rook lift after 19...Kxh7 (or 19...Kh8 20. Rd3! ) 20. Rd3! .

Also after 17...Kxh7 18. Qh5+ Kg7 (or 18...Kg8), a second Queen check (as in the game) with 19. Qg5+! is also required before the Rook lift.

If instead, after 17...Kxh7 18. Qh5+ Kg7, White goes for the immediate 19. Rd3? (position below),


click for larger view

Black turns the tables and snatches victory from the jaws of defeat after 19...Rfd8! (or 19...Rfg8! ), as now 20. Rg3+ Kf8 leaves Black with a secure King and an extra piece.

The correct sequence is of course 17. Bxh7+ Kxh7 18. Qh5+ Kg7 19. Qg4+! (diagram below).


click for larger view

Now after the King moves to the h-file with 19...Kh6 (or 19...Kh7 or 19...Kh8) 20. Rd3! creates decisive mate-threats.

Sep-02-14  morfishine: Didn't we have this same problem a few months back?

<17.Bxh7+ Kxh7 18.Qh5+ Kg7 19.Qg4+> and White wins due to 19...King any 20.Rd3 and Black cannot prevent 21.Rh3 mate

<patzer2> Nice job covering <17...Kh8>; Using a PGN editor I found White wins with the same theme except the White Queen exploits the dark squares: 17.Bxh7+ Kh8 18.Qh5 Kg7 19.Qg4+ Kh8 20.Rd3 f5 21.Bxf5 exf5 22.Qh5+ Kg7 23.Qg5+ Kh7 24.Rh3#

*****

Sep-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Uuro-rectal septum?
Sep-02-14  Sally Simpson: Rather obvious. Black should have played one more move. To see if the hasty 19.Rd3 was played which, as patzer2 points out would be a blunder.

Maybe it was this move he expected when he played his bluff move 15...Bc6.


click for larger view

Thinking he won't play Bxf6 because I'll have an open g-file and an attack on g2.

There is no Ng5+ follow up which is usually needed when playing the Classical Bishop Sac. So go ahead and sac on h7. Rd3 does not work, all you have is a perpetual.

Only when the the postition appeared on the board did he realise White has Qg4+ and then indeed Rd3 mates. But he should have played on. I've seen them botched up though the chances of Adams screwing it up are practically zilch.

Sep-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Damn. This is harder than the average Tuesday puzzle I remember solving. :(
Sep-02-14  rozzatu: Not so simple as it seems. It's a long, long agony.

17...Kh8 18.Rd3 Rfd8 19.Rg3 Qa5 20.Bf5 Bf3 21.Qxf3 Bxf2+ 22.Rxf2 Qxf5 23.Qxf5 exf5 24.Rxf5 Rd5 25.Nxd5 a5 26.Rh5#

Sep-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Castleinthesky: This is more of a Friday puzzle (which I never get) than a Tuesday puzzle (which I usually get). The best I could figure out was a perpetual check draw or the threat of a mate. Too much rubber to burn for me to see the puzzle through to its conclusion.
Sep-02-14  rozzatu: The line I have posted is made by a computer, obviously.
Sep-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Easy: Bishop sac followed by queen check , and then the rook is brought up.

The king is hemmed in by the rook and his own pawns and mate is inescapable.

Sep-02-14  BOSTER: Playing the opening ,when the <tempo> is the most impotant element of the game , you should not afford to play like this: 5...c6 and then 12...c5, and 10...Be7 and 13...Bxc5.

And only imagine that black could save only one tempo. We would have the POTD pos. like this with move Rad8.


click for larger view

And I don't know who would like to<Go Greek> even with the possibility Nd5 cutting the d file.

Sep-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  gawain: Helpful analysis, <patzer2>. Thanks.
Sep-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: It should probably be pointed out that in positions where the bishop is taken and White plays Rd3:


click for larger view

Black does have a mate-delaying maneuver with...Be3 and ...Qxe3 after the bishop is taken. It's dead lost materially, of course.

Sep-02-14  patzer2: <gawain> You're welcome.
Sep-02-14  Mating Net: This puzzle is one of the reasons I refrain from playing a move such as h3 unless there is no other way to deal with a g4 Bishop. The Rook lift is not possible and you could miss out on some tactics.

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