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Kateryna Lagno vs Alexandra Kosteniuk
European Team Championship (Women) (2007), Heraklion GRE, rd 9, Nov-06
Spanish Game: Marshall Attack. General (C89)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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sac: 33.Bxg7+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-20-17  morfishine: <Once> But there's 2 ways to the back rank. <agb2002> points out that after 33.Bxg7+ <33...Ke8> White simply plays another clearance move <34.Bh6> and now White threatens not only to transpose to his winning line "C" but <35.Rg8+>

<agb2002> Ref "C" White can sac the Queen and mate with the pawn: 33.Bg7+ Ke7 34.Qh4+ Kd6 35.Be5+ Kd5 36.Qe4+! fxe4 37.fxe4#


click for larger view

*****

Feb-20-17  ChessHigherCat: <diagonalley: NO WAY is this a monday puzzle...>

C'est trop difficile. Ce n'est pas mon day"

Feb-20-17  Pedro.Akcio: I tried really hard to sacrifice the queen in every possible and stupid ways, only to realize that the queen actually wanted to go to b8...then everything became clear :)
Feb-20-17  jhoro: Took me much longer for a Monday...

White missed a nice shot on move 29. Maybe it can be tomorrow's puzzle

Feb-20-17  awfulhangover: Ok, I "played" 33.Bxg7, but felt like an idiot, since I desperately had tried to find a "Monday attack". I tried to find a brutal win after 33. Ke8 or Ke7.
Feb-20-17  An Engliishman: Good afternoon: This puzzle was pretty wild for a Monday!
Feb-20-17  BOSTER: It was not necessary to sacr the black knight on d4. Black's play 11...Qd7 ,keeping c5 square for retreat.
Feb-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <YouRang: <A little trickier than the typical Monday.>> Indeed!

<ChessHigherCat> À force de forger on devient forgeron. ;)

Feb-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Easy. Bxg7 Rxg7 Kxg7 Qxg7 Rxg7 Bxg7 Kxg7 Rxg7 Qxg7 Qxg7 Mate!
Feb-20-17  AlicesKnight: Seen correctly once the idea of Q_sacrifice was ditched...
Feb-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajk68: Glad I didn't spend too much time trying to find something devastating.
Feb-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: All you need to do is see that after 33. Bxg7+ the B can't be taken without a ruinous check on B8, and the problem is solved. There is no better move. No need for calculations. If the black K moves, at the very least the white B can simply return to e5 and black can squirm.
Feb-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: << morfishine: <Once> But there's 2 ways to the back rank. <agb2002> points out that after 33.Bxg7+ <33...Ke8> White simply plays another clearance move <34.Bh6> and now White threatens not only to transpose to his winning line "C" but <35.Rg8+> <agb2002> Ref "C" White can sac the Queen and mate with the pawn: 33.Bg7+ Ke7 34.Qh4+ Kd6 35.Be5+ Kd5 36.Qe4+! fxe4 37.fxe4#>>

I saw this Q sac to finish things off. I thought it might have been what happened. The moves as played lose less dramatically.

Feb-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor:


click for larger view

From here I saw as others did the Bxg7+

Then as played in the game but as some also saw I looked at:

[Event "Edited game"]
[Site "RICHARD-HGSRKJN"]
[Date "2017.02.21"]
[Round "-"]
[White "-"]
[Black "-"]
[Result "1-0"]

33. Bxg7+ Ke7 34. Qh4+ Kd6 35. Be5+ Kd5 36. Qe4+ fxe4 37. Bxe4# White mates 1-0


click for larger view

Obviously there are other lines but a couple were enough for now.

Feb-20-17  morfishine: <Richard Tayor> One thing I was able to grasp positionally, was that the White Queen and DSB could control both the h2b8 & h4d8 diagonals simultaneously, rendering Black's position hopeless

*****

Feb-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: Here's a problem I have been trying to solve for about a week! It is a Sam Lloyd problem I got from a local paper, the column by Leonard Barden:


click for larger view

It is Black to move. So Black makes a move then White moves, then Black, then White, then Black then White and it is mate

But it is a helpmate. White and Black cooperate to make a mate. Barden said it took him 1/2 an hour. That is pretty quick. He's an old codger but I think he was British Champion in the good old days.

So help mate:

1. .... Black
2. White Black
3. White Black
4. White mates...

I will try a few more times. I have a whole book of Sam Lloyds problems given my father years ago but they always or mostly stump me so if anyone likes those things here is one!!

Feb-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <morfishine: <Richard Tayor> One thing I was able to grasp positionally, was that the White Queen and DSB could control both the h2b8 & h4d8 diagonals simultaneously, rendering Black's position hopeless...> Yes. I think Black made a few errors but it was a lively fight for sure, an unusual var of the Open for me....
Feb-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: Not sure if it was quite hopeless a few moves earlier but sacrifices on g6 were in the air if the K didn't move to f8. But there are positions such as that that Black is in that the Black player digs into and defends. Defence is also important. I have defended theoretically "hopeless" positions and either won them or drawn, although I I've lost a lot also! But another one is 'Defending Lost Positions' which is the title of a book by Schiller and a chapter in Naroditsky's book on positional chess. Just looking at the title helped me! You often win or draw from tactically AND positionally lost positions, such is chess....no one ever won a game by resigning!

In 3 0 games I often play to checkmate and win on time with only a pawn against a Q, R and say 5 pawns or something (as long as I have at least one pawn) or I get a stalemate....mostly of course I lose but it keeps the opponent busy to have to force a win!

Feb-21-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White's queen can enter on two fronts, dooming black's king.
Feb-21-17  ChessHigherCat: <Richard Taylor: Here's a problem I have been trying to solve for about a week! It is a Sam Lloyd problem I got from a local paper, the column by Leonard Barden.> That's the first masochism tango puzzle I've ever seen. Does it start out 1...Qg7 2. Bd5 Kg6?
Feb-21-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <ChessHigherCat: <Richard Taylor: Here's a problem I have been trying to solve for about a week! It is a Sam Lloyd problem I got from a local paper, the column by Leonard Barden.> That's the first masochism tango puzzle I've ever seen. Does it start out 1...Qg7 2. Bd5 Kg6?>

I couldn't solve it although I found the first move. 1. ... Qg7 isn't the first move. It is very clever, but what is hard is that you are kind of "thinking backwards", that is both players are cooperating to win the game for White!! So, as with help-mates (I have rarely attempted any of Lloyd's problems but I think they could be good training in 'lateral thinking') I didn't solve it...

I can give a hint. Look for all possible ways to checkmate Black. Set up as many checkmate positions as you can. Then think of how to get to those. Also think of the basic tactics that are used (fork, pin, double attack, discovered attack, discovered check, double checks, skewers, and piece traps etc). The solution is ingenious. Even when I'd seen all but 2 moves I gave in and looked up the solution. It is actually instructive (surprisingly) in the method used.

Feb-25-17  ChessHigherCat: <Richard Taylor> Your puzzle’s too hard for me but it reminds me of a passage I just read about chessplayers in the park written by some guy who’s traveling backwards in time, like a film being rewound, so he always mistakes effects for causes: “Each game, it’s true, begins in disarray goes through episodes of contortion and cross—purpose. But things work out. All that scowl and elbow and terseness of posture, all that agony—it works out. One final tug on the white pawn, and perfect order is restored; and the players at last look up, smiling and rubbing their hands. Time will tell, and I put my trust in time, absolutely. As do the chess players, of course, every move legitimated by the slapped clock.” (Martin Amis, “Time’s Arrow”)
Mar-01-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I read that book! I cant recall that part about chess, but it is a great book with everything going backwards. It is strangely "redeeming" as the SS man returns to childhood. Perhaps, one thinks, it might not have happened. Of course, it all did. But it is a good device....long before I wrote a poem that went backwards, words backwards and so on....

I want to read more by Martin and his father Kingsley, who was a great writer also.

I didn't solve this puzzle. But the moves are:

1. ... Kf6 2. then the White rook moves....

It involves a well known tactic in normal chess.

Let me know if you want anymore clues. It is hard for sure but do-able. Altho I got lazy and 'cheated' by looking up the solution (usually I don't but I was tired the week I was doing that). Not sure if I could have solved it...Sam Lloyd is complex, he was very clever and did maths and logical puzzles at which I am hopeless so I haven't looked at his book much...

Mar-01-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: The solution is beautiful by the way.
Mar-03-17  ChessHigherCat: Okay, I'll take another look at the puzzle when I get some spare time. I just discovered Amis recently, while browsing through youtube, along with Ian McEwan, who's very interesting, too, and they're both good friends with Salman Rushdie. All three of them are refreshingly unconventional and anti-PC. It took me a while to get the last sentence "every move legitimated by the slapped clock", but it's another example of his false optimism: just as he thinks every chessgame ends in the perfect harmony of the initial position, nobody ever loses on time because there's always a final (=initial) punch of the clock.
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