chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Eli Baikovicius
  
Number of games in database: 4
Years covered: 1936 to 1969
Overall record: +1 -3 =0 (25.0%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games.


Search Sacrifice Explorer for Eli Baikovicius
Search Google for Eli Baikovicius


ELI BAIKOVICIUS
(born May-03-1902, died Apr-19-1976, 73 years old) Lithuania

[what is this?]

Elijah/Elias/Eli Baikowitz (Baikovicius), born on the third of May 1902 in Kaunas. From 1924 until 1940, he lived in Taurage. From 1940 until the outbreak of the war, he lived in Kaunas. Schooling: Completed business school. His profession: a merchant/ mill owner He died in Montreal April 19, 1976

Last updated: 2020-02-13 08:50:35

 page 1 of 1; 4 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. E Baikovicius vs E Strehle  0-1411936non-FIDE Munich OlympiadE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
2. A Wojciechowski vs E Baikovicius  1-0221936non-FIDE Munich OlympiadB02 Alekhine's Defense
3. E Baikovicius vs W Ernst  0-1211936non-FIDE Munich OlympiadD02 Queen's Pawn Game
4. H Brodie vs E Baikovicius  0-1491969Quebec opC34 King's Gambit Accepted
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Baikovicius wins | Baikovicius loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-01-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chesshistoryinterest: <hemy>

Re first edition of "Jews in history of Lithuanian chess", that is certainly a different Blumenfeld alright!

I had also noticed wrong reference numbers of foot notes, and was going to advise you of it.

A few other little things I came across (these seem to mainly be problems with the sources used rather than mistakes in the book itself. So possibly it could pay to create your own tables for these events and give the source, saying it's been corrected):

(1) The first Lithuania-Latvia (Kaunas-Riga) match, 28-29 December 1929, Riga:

This given in the top table on page 133: The book has referenced this as being from "Latvijas Sargs". But in fact it's from "Latvis", 31 December 1929, page 8.

The table itself is wrong. The second bottom Lithuanian board should have two losses, not a loss and a draw; while the bottom Lithuanian board should have a loss and a draw, not two losses.

Aside from this, the order of the bottom two Lithuanian players is probably wrong. Apart from this newspaper item, I found five newspapers giving Z. Kolodnas as Board 6, and A. Kolodnas as Board 7 - as the book gives on page 130. But there are also two newspapers giving A. Kolodnas as Board 6, and Z. Kolodnas as Board 7. So the issue is not entirely clear and I suppose needs to be assessed. The weight of numbers suggests Z. Kolodnas as Board 6, and A. Kolodnas as Board 7. Probably, the table given in "Jaunakas Zinas", 30 December 1929, page 10 is correct.

(2) The table at the bottom of page 133 (from "Latvijas Sacha Vestnesis", No 1):

This is for the second Lithuania-Latvia match, 31 December 1931-1 January 1932, Kaunas.

The table gives the wrong score for Jeglinas - he should have a draw and a loss. "Lietuvos Aidas", 5 January 1932, page 9; and "Jaunakas Zinas", 2 January 1932, page 7 look correct.

(3) The table at the top of page 131 (from "Saha Maksla", 10 December 1937, page 267) giving all the Lithuanian-Latvian match-ups up to 1937:

They incorrectly give the date of the first match as "1928" when it should be 1929. So the period "1928-1937" as written on both page 131 and page 132 is incorrect. It should be "1929-1937".

Also, they have totaled the Lithuanian score incorrectly. It should be 63, not 61.

(4) On page 146 is a table of the 1932 Kaunas Championship. This was given by Mikenas in his column in "Lietuvos Aidas", 19 March 1932, page 9.

Clearly, there is something wrong for Molkas on it. He looks as though he beats (not loses to) Hellmanas (Hellmanas's line gives him a zero against Molkas). This would then match up with the score of 1.5 given for Molkas. And if that is correct, then Molkas should be tenth on the table, and Luckis last.

Feb-01-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest> Many thanks. I will work on all the issues you point out.

Meanwhile I restored the table of the second Lithuania-Latvia match https://www.dropbox.com/s/hwdv0y1dp...

Feb-01-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chesshistoryinterest: <hemy> Nice restoration.

There is a cleaner table here - "Atputa", 20 January 1933, page 29

http://www.periodika.lv/periodika2-...

It also gives the correct initial for Vistaneckis ("I" instead of "J"). Unfortunately, Luckis's name is spelt in a less recognisable form.

Also, evidence that the match went into a third day, and thus finished on 2 January 1933 is here - "Stadions", 5 January 1933, page 3

http://www.periodika.lv/periodika2-...

One other issue: From the first Lithuania-Latvia match 1929, there is a game on chessgames.com: Petrovs - "Gerz" Gladstein

Vladimir Petrov vs Gerz Gladstein, 1929

But from "Jews in Lithuania chess history", Gladstein's first name seems to be "Gercas". (And I also saw it in one newspaper item as "Hercas".) Is it possible to get a definite ruling on this? (And thus head up his page with it.)

Also, on the PGN for this game, the source seems to be garbled (I think it's supposed to be the Russian language "Today" newspaper, 2 January 1930, page 6.)

Feb-01-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest> Indeed Memel Territory (Memelland or Memelgebiet) controlled by Lithuania, included Klaipeda, Taurage, Marijampole, and Alytus counties.

Baikovicius played for Klaipeda in matches against Liepaja and Kaunas. He also played in matches between 3 Klaipeda chess clubs, Jewish ("Bar-Kochba"), German ("Schachverein Memel") and Lithuanian ("Klaipėdos lietuvių šachmatų klubas" - "Lithuanian chess club of Klaipeda").

I compiled some pages from 2nd draft of the book "Jews in Lithuania chess history", related chess life in Klaipeda region: https://www.dropbox.com/s/5r0r9ecgz...

Feb-01-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest> <"Gerz" Gladstein> vs <"Gercas" Gladstein>. "Gerz" is a common name of Ashkenazim Jews. Gercas is a Lithuanian version. It is like Donaldas Trumpas or Vladimiras Putinas in Lithuanian version. "Herz" is common in Israel form of this name. By me the name Gerz is OK.
Feb-01-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest> <cleaner table in "Atputa", 20 January 1933, page 29> Yes it much cleaner table. I made it even more clean:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/v4jrt4hfq...

<Luckis's name is spelt in a less recognisable form> Lutzkis in Latvian sounds like Luckis in Lithuanian. In English his name should be pronounced like Loo-tzky.

<Also, on the PGN for this game, the source seems to be garbled (I think it's supposed to be the Russian language "Today"> Yes, you right.

Feb-01-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest>

<Kaunas-Klaipeda, 27-28 June 1937> The match was held in Klaipeda.
In the draft of the 2nd edition (section about Klaipeda) you will found: "1937 metais Kauno šachmatų komanda buvo atvykusi į Klaipėdą." The references are to "Vakarai", 28 June 1937, p. 6, and 30 June 1937, p. 6.

Feb-01-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest>

<Klaipeda-Liepaja, April 1936, Liepaja.> The table of this match is also in the draft of the book, it was created by Kęstutis Andriejūnas, Klaipeda chess historian.

<Baikovicius seems to be on an amazingly low board for someone who was part of the Lithuanian team at the 1936 Olympiad.> Indeed, he also played on 4th board of Jewish chess club "Bar-Kochba". His results in Olympiad was mediocre (3/9) on 2nd reserve board and his rating in Canada was very low.

Interestingly on 16th board of "Bar-Kochba" played J. Baikowitz!

Feb-01-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest>

<Luckis beats Pakalniskis; and Baikovicius beats Okulevicius. Not sure if the order of listing here is the Board order. I'm not sure what this event is, but I imagine you would be able to translate it to say.>

It was a match "Bar-Kochba" - Klaipeda Lithuanian chess club. You will see it in the same part of the book draft I placed in my Dropbox.

Feb-01-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest>

<The book has referenced this as being from "Latvijas Sargs". But in fact it's from "Latvis">. Thanks for founding wrong reference. It will be changed.

I prepared part of the draft of the 2nd edition of the book related to the matches. I included the photo of the fashion store of Luckis with the spelling "M. Lutzki" on the top. https://www.dropbox.com/s/q7qzrewuy...

<the table gives the wrong score for Jeglinas - he should have a draw and a loss.> About this mistake was mentioned in the draft of the 2nd edition.

I will check more the differences in sources and result of processing them.

Feb-02-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest> <Also, they have totaled the Lithuanian score incorrectly. It should be 63, not 61>

I can see (after enlarging) that it is 63 on the table, the left part of "3" is not visible clear enough. I fixed it, to make 63 visible.

To compare old and new tables:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/1vlp3e6og...

Feb-02-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest> <You say the match was from 31 December 1932 to 1 January 1933. But in fact, a couple of adjourned games were played on a third day - 2 January 1933.>

In the draft of the 2nd edition I found the next:

"On the eve of New Year's Day, December 31, the first round was accompanied by success of Lithuanian chess players. The first day's defeat of 4: 2 disrupted the hosts' hopes of winning. In the second round on January 1, they had a lead of 2.5: 1.5, but the two adjourned games, which continued the following day, despite the better position of Latvians, ended in a draw"

The dates of the match "on 31 December 1932 and 1 January 1933" were taken from "Шахматы в СССР", Nr.2, 1933, they are still in the draft and will be fixed.

https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/0dre...

Feb-03-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chesshistoryinterest: <hemy>

<Interestingly on 16th board of "Bar-Kochba" played J. Baikowitz!> Yes, I noticed that, too! I presume "Baikowitz' is the Jewish or German form of the name; Baikovicius the Lithuanian.

Gerz/Gercas/Hercas/Herz; Luckis/Lutzkis/Lutzki/Lutskis; Marcos/Marcas/Markos/Mark. All these differing forms of a name depending on country/nationality/locale/language/ethnic people/religion, etc are a nightmare for chess historians! (I've also wondered why do Lithuanians add 'as'; and Latvians add 's' to nearly every word?)

<I can see (after enlarging) that it is 63 on the table, the left part of "3" is not visible clear enough. I fixed it, to make 63 visible.> Yes, I realized that after printing out your second file from the second edition. The table was much larger in the second edition than the first. Good job on fixing it.

Feb-03-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chesshistoryinterest: <hemy>

<I compiled some pages from 2nd draft of the book "Jews in Lithuania chess history", related chess life in Klaipeda region: https://www.dropbox.com/s/5r0r9ecgz....>

Wow, very impressive. Thanks very much for this. This is information that would be very hard to find anywhere else - real history! Perhaps this is the sort of book that the organisation "Chess history and literature society"

https://www.kwabc.org/en/news.html?...

could be interested in. Perhaps they might be interested in raising a subscription to fund publishing it?

<<Klaipeda-Liepaja, April 1936, Liepaja.> The table of this match is also in the draft of the book, it was created by Kęstutis Andriejūnas, Klaipeda chess historian.> Perhaps it could be worth also creating a table for the Kaunas-Klaipeda June 1937 match to put in the book. There are a good number of reasonably heavyweight players in this. I have created one for myself, at any rate.

I wonder what happened to players like Luckis and Simon Gordon when Nazi Germany took over the Memelland in March 1939? Presumably Luckis (being a Jew), at any rate, would have fled inland to what was left of Lithuania.

<I prepared part of the draft of the 2nd edition of the book related to the matches. I included the photo of the fashion store of Luckis with the spelling "M. Lutzki" on the top. https://www.dropbox.com/s/q7qzrewuy... Thanks for this. Is it intended that this document covers all the matches of the Lithuanian National team up to 1944, other than Olympiads?

Feb-03-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest> Your comments are very productive and motivating me to continue with the research. I'm also spending time for creating archive of articles from "Draugas".

Eugenijus browsing every issue of "Draugas", starting 1953 and passing me the once, where he founds an articles about chess life of Lithuanians. I'm creating good quality images from the articles, that can be used as illustrations and also as archived documents. We are already in 1956. It will be great source for information that simple search never would found.

I will respond to your comments later, now my wife is waiting me to go out ...

Feb-03-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chesshistoryinterest: Thanks, <hemy>. I'm glad you feel that way. Sometimes I'm a bit concerned I'm "overdoing" things and taking too much of your time... (tell me if I am). Equally, I'm being motivated to do more research than I otherwise would be. I certainly know a great deal more about Lithuanian chess history in the 1930's (and other times) than I did two years ago when it was a real grey area. My initial motivation came from researching Estonian chess history (the land of Keres, who was Ortvin Sarapu's hero). In doing so, I came across some material on Mikenas, who had a connection with Keres, and I got to wondering what happened with him after he moved to Lithuania in 1931. And then it becomes interesting to know more about Lithuanian chess history in general, not just Mikenas.

I wasn't aware of "Draugas", but earlier postings by you did seem to indicate it was a useful resource. Mining every issue of it sounds like a really good idea.

Feb-03-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest> <Is it intended that this document covers all the matches of the Lithuanian National team up to 1944, other than Olympiads?>

There are more matches covered in the draft. Some of them are placed in the chapters related to particular players.

As I already mentioned, Eugenijus Paleckis is a writer in Lithuanian Language. He is responsible to process results of my research and create a story. He is always asking for my opinion, but I fully trust him.

Shortly after the book was published (January 2015) in Lithuanian parliament was held ceremony of presentation of this book. My old friend Boris Rositsan, who provided budget for book editing and printing (donated by his brother Michail Rositsan, wealthy businessman), presented the book while Eugenijus Paleckis was staying nearby. I was invited to this event, but choose not to come to Vilnius. Boris is my friend, but my greatest friend is truth. Eugenijus was a writer, volunteered for this project from 2008.

One and half year ego Eugenijus sent to Boris the draft of the 2nd edition, with my name was added as coauthor by Eugenijus . This time Boris couldn't get money from his brother or other sources.

I described the situation to explain the problem with publishing the book. Boris Rositsan have the rights of 1st edition.

In 2016 I met with Isai Scheinberg
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isai_...) son of Matafia Scheinberg

Isai offered to pay for translation of the book to English. We found translator, WGM, living in USA, who's 1st language is Lithuanian and English is perfect.

During her visit in Vilnius she met Boris and was verbally harassed by him. She quit of this project.
In Eugenijus opinion Boris wanted full control of this project, for him is important Lithuanian edition only.

Feb-04-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chesshistoryinterest: Thanks, <hemy>. I was missing Lithuania-Latvia 1937. While Lithuania-Latvia 1942 would have had no Jews in the teams. I might have one or two comments which I'll post a bit later on.

Interesting stories on trying to get the second edition published. Having to deal with several different people often not easy.

<Shortly after the book was published (January 2015) in Lithuanian parliament was held ceremony of presentation of this book.> That's an impressively high-level recognition!

Feb-12-20  hemy: Baikowitz Family History Tavrig (Taurage)/Kovno (Kaunas) Lithuania

Leib Baikowitz (Eli’s father) :

Originally from Tavrig (Taurage) Leib Baikowitz was the biggest forest logger in his area, he studied in a Yeshiva and went on to be a highly respected entrepreneur.

With his own funding, he built a synagogue in Taurage. He donated his time and money to people in need and was a member of the revision commission of the king’s bank; he died in Kovno (Kaunas) in 1932.
Another son, Leola, was killed in the Kovno Ghetto.

Before his death he forgave all the loans owed to him by people in need and donated 10% of his wealth to charity and gave six *palaces (“Palatas”) to the Jewish hospital in Memel (Klaipėda). He was a rabbi (“zeit kazioner rabiner”) and a synagogue administrator.

His wife, Perl, maiden name: Ivensky was a child of the highly respected Ivensky family in Kovno (Kaunas).
Living in Tavrig, she was a social worker, gave her kids a great upbringing and perished in the Kovno ghetto during the Kinder action in March 1944.

Leib and Perl had five kids together, three sons and two daughters; one daughter Bertha (Berta) died in the Kovno ghetto the other daughter Lina moved to Israel.
Their son Ben came to Canada in 1938 and died in Montreal in 1953, he left a widow Zelda. Eli Followed him to Canada with his family after the war.
Another son, Leola, was killed in the Kovno Ghetto.

Elijah/Elias/Eli Baikowitz (Baikovicius), born on the third of May 1902 in Kaunas.
From 1924 until 1940, he lived in Taurage. From 1940 until the outbreak of the war, he lived in Kaunas. Schooling: Completed business school. His profession: a merchant/ mill owner.
He died in Montreal April 19, 1976.

In the 1930s Leib and his son Elias had houses in both Taurage and Kaunas. (about 150 kilometers apart) Taurage was once the capital of independent Lithuania and about 25% of the population was Jewish.
Tarauge sits at the former border with Klaipeda and a Russian free trade zone, and on the Jura river. The Jura river runs to the Baltic sea. It sits almost midway between Moscow and Berlin.

Eli played for Lithuania in the Chess Olympics in Munich in 1936. He married Fruma Gurwitz.
Fruma’s family owned an Inn and built a library and her brother built a movie theater in the 1930s in Taurage.
Fruma’s brother – Beryl built a movie theater and a large library.

Beryl’s family – Mother, wife, two daughter and one son were all sent to the Siauliai ghetto, and Beryl was the only one to survive. The names are in the Siauliai ghetto directory. Some died in the ghetto or work camps others were deported to Dachau and Auschwitz.

Almost all the Jews of Taurage were killed or sent to work camps or concentration camps. The Baikowitz family survived because they were in Kaunas at the time. The Jews of Kaunas were rounded up and forced into the Kovno ghetto.

Eli built a very large flour and lumber mill in Taurage in 1934 called Progres with his partner Gitkin in 1934 and the plans for this mill are currently in the Vilnius National archives.

Gitkin was killed in Taurage when the Germans advanced and the Germans expropriated the mill. The mill had previously been expropriated by the Soviets in 1940. These records are also in the state archives.

The mill was located on the corner of mill and progres streets. Today, those streets are still called ‘Progreso’ and ‘Maluno’ in Taurage. Eli was a known manufacturer and financier, for twelve years he was a member of the state’s management and for 10 years, a member of the tax agency and the royal sick-fund (kranken-kaseh);
He served as the representative of the Jewish people’s bank (folks bank) he was awarded the “order demeanor” (gedimin orden) for his social and charity work.
His wife, Fruma, maiden name: Girwitz (Gerwich) was a bookkeeper and an activist in various Zionist youth organizations.
She was in the Kovno ghetto and she was rescued by Lithuanians; she was an activist in the Union for Lithuanian Jews; she was known for helping others and her good heartiness.

Elie and Fruma had two sons: Harry (Aryeh Leib) born 1936 and Jakob (Yakov) born 1938.

The Jews of Kovno were forced into the Ghetto in 1941. Harry, and his brother and his parents went into the ghetto along with this Grandmother Perl – she had 5 children – Harry’s father and aunts and uncles Ben, Eli, Bertha, Lina, Leola. Ben went to Canada in 1938 and died in 1953, he was married to Zelda, and Eli and his family followed him there in 1948. Lina moved to Israel. All the others perished in the ghetto.
The Kovno ghetto held 40,000 Jews and only an estimated 500 survived.

Eli kept a copy of his invitation to play in the 1936 Munich Chess Olympics from Nazi Germany and played chess regularly with the head of the Kovno ghetto. The Head of the ghetto considered Eli to be a ‘cultured man’ and as a result he did not deport Eli or his family members to a death camp.

To be continued ...

Feb-12-20  hemy: Continuation:

The Soviet army occupied Lithuania in June 1940, The German army occupied in June 1941 – within 6 months the Germans and their Lithuanian collaborators had killed half the Jews in Kovno.

Between July and August 1941, the Jews were concentrated into the ghetto. The Germans destroyed the small ghetto on Harry’s 5th birthday – October 4th 1941.

By fall 1943, the Kovno ghetto was converted into a concentration camp with the Germans escalating the killings ahead of the Soviet advance.

The family escaped the ghetto 3 days after the Estonian Aktion (October 26, 1943) – . On October 26, 1943, the SS deported more than 2,700 people from the main camp. The SS sent those deemed fit to work to Vaivara concentration camp in Estonia, and deported children and elderly people to Auschwitz

So the immediate family escaped on October 29, 1943, and the ghetto was liquidated a few months later, with almost no survivors in the spring of 1944.

Perl was not strong enough to make the escape. Eli later told Jack that the hardest part of the war was saying goodbye to his mother Perl on the day they escaped.

Perl was killed during the Kinder Aktion. On March 27, 1944 was the Kinder Aktion when the Germans killed the remaining children in the camp. Only an estimated 150 children survived the Kovno ghetto.

Fruma met up with a lady in Kaunas she knew from Taurage – Barbora Banionie – the illiterate daughter and youngest of 9 children. Barbora had a baby daughter Irena- born Dec. 12 1941. Fruma asked her to help the children escape the ghetto. Eli cut a hole in the barbed wire and at a pre-determined time on October 29, 1943. Barbora came with a baby carriage to transport Jack and Harry back to her apartment in Kaunas. They all had to hide in her closet because a German officer lived on the first floor of her apartment block. After about a week in hiding they all escaped to the countryside and were hidden in separate locations. Barbora arranged to have them transported to the countryside around Taurage to have them hidden.

Bartuseviciene Genovaite from Klaipeda was the daughter of Stanislovas Vaisvilas and Juzefa who hid Fruma for 2 months and built a special hideout for her in Kasbarynai (next to Lomiai). Her uncle Leonas Vaisvilis also hid Fruma and Jack for 7 months.

After securing his family’s safety, Eli went into the woods to join the Partisans and fought for a division called the Avengers.

The Nazis destroyed the small ghetto on October 4, 1941, and killed almost all of its inhabitants at the Ninth Fort. Later that same month, on October 28, SS-Rottenführer Helmut Rauca of the Kaunas Gestapo (secret state police) conducted the selection in the Kaunas Ghetto. All ghetto inhabitants were forced to assemble in the central square of the ghetto. Rauca selected 9,200 Jewish men, women, and children, about one-third of the ghetto's population. The next day, October 29, all of these people were shot at the Ninth Fort in huge pits dug in advance.

On October 26, 1943, the SS deported more than 2,700 people from the main camp. The SS sent those deemed fit to work to Vaivara concentration camp in Estonia, and deported children and elderly people to Auschwitz”. - Wikipedia.

These hiding arrangements in Taurage were also arranged by Albinas Sabaliauskas and his wife Sofia who lived in Taurage – according to the census at the archives in Taurage they were both born in 1898. According to the Heritage Director at the Taurage museum – Albinas was probably a business associate of Eli.

After the Soviets occupied Kaunas, the surviving Jews were forbidden from leaving. Eli quickly realized that Stalin was just as dangerous as Hitler and managed to obtain fake Polish citizenship documents so they would be allowed to leave Lithuania by train and go to Poland. From there he connected with contacts who took them through the Polish forests on foot into Germany to the displaced persons camp – Feldafing near Munich.

To be continued ...

Feb-12-20  hemy: Continuation:

Elias, Fruma, Berl testimony:

“The Baikowitz family, while in Kaunas and later also in the Kovno ghetto, received news through a close acquaintance, the peasant Albinas Sabalauskas, about the annihilation of Taurage˙ Jews. The situation in the Kovno ghetto steadily worsened. At the time, the begining of the end was apparent for the last surviving Jews in the ghetto. Baikowitz however had enough personal acquaintances among Lithuanians. In Taurage˙, Baikowitz had been a member of the city council for 6 years. He had been president of the customs office for 6 years (setting tariffs). He had been a member of the county’s healthcare fund and had had a flour mill called “Progress”. These conditions gave Baikowitz the opportunity to make many acquaintances among the Lithuanian intelligentsia and also among the peasants. He decided then to send his wife and children out of the ghetto and to leave himself thereafter. At that time, the tactical situation on the battlefront was sufficiently clear. Fascist Germany was rapidly approaching its predictable destruction and downfall. Baikowitz contacted and readied his Lithuanian acquaintances and, three days after the Estonian Aktion, his wife Fruma and both their children left the ghetto for the house of an acquaintance, Captain More. The Lithuanian captain had been, at the beginning of the war, the assistant of the Kaunas county head. Fruma stayed at the captain’s house for one week. Staying longer was not possible. One child stayed in town with the captain. Fruma returned to ghetto with the second child. The captain sent the little boy Leyb’ele (Harry) to a village seventy kilometers away from Taurage˙, where he served as a shepherd for a peasant until the liberation. Fruma and her second child remained in the ghetto for only five days. She disguised herself as a Lithuanian peasant woman and, in a fortuitous SS truck, travelled to a town not far from Taurage˙. From there, she walked five kilometers and came to a village, to the home of a chance peasant. Here, she spent one night and then travelled away to a close acquaintance, the peasant Sabalauskas, in Taurage˙. On the way, she continually put her child to sleep with the help of barbitol, because he spoke only Yiddish. Sabalauskas owned a shop, to which Germans would come. The Taurage Lithuanian ˇSulcas, a veteran with a missing hand, found a place for Fruma and her child in the village Kazberinyai˙ at the house of the peasant Leonas Vaiˇsvilis. Here, Fruma passed herself off as a Russian woman. (At the time, the Germans brought women and children from deep into Russia and allowed them to work for peasants in Lithuania.) For seven months Fruma stayed here with her child without any documents. None of the neighbours knew, of course, that she was Jewish. Fruma succeded in entrusting her child to a policeman, who at the beginning of the war had been a notorious Jew-killer in the town of Batakiai. It was said of this murderer that, from Batakiai Jews shot to death, he cut off the fingers with goldenringsonthem. He greatly feared the oncoming retribution and, by saving the life of a Jewish child, wanted to wash away his sins and guarantee himself a spot in heaven after the return of the Red Army to Lithuania. The policeman was also originally from the village Kazberine˙. His family name was Jonikas. After the arrival of the Red Army in Lithuania, the murderer fled to the forest to hide out. He did however rescue Fruma’s child, and hid him until the liberation. With the nearing of the battlefront began raids on Red partisans in surrounding villages. Fruma again set off for Taurage, to the house of the peasant Sabalauskas. By then, the Red Army had already occupied Vilnius. As a result, Fruma found an opportunity to hide out in the village Kazberine˙ at the house of the peasant Stanislav, the brother of Leonas Vaiˇsvilis. The peasant built a hideout for Fruma, where she stayed for two months— until the arrival of the Red Army. After his wife and children had left the Kovno ghetto, Elijou Bajkowicz remained there for five weeks. After that, he escaped to the Red partisans operating in the Taurage region.

To be continued ...

Feb-12-20  hemy: Continuation:

The Red partisans respected and appreciated Baikowitz, because he knew the whole surrounding region and had acquaintances with many peasants in the villages, from whom the partisans would more easily procure food and be informed of all that was necessary about the Germans. Their platoon was called Avenger. Baikowitz collaborated with the platoon for exactly one year—until the arrival of the Red Army in Taurage. During that year, Baikowitz would meet regularly with his wife and also his children, whom he provided with all their necessities. After the liberation, the Baikowitz parents and both rescued children reunited. Elias was informed in great detail, by the dozens of peasants he was with in the villages and by the partisans, about the annihilation of Jews in Taurage.

The personally handwritten signatures of the residents of the Feldafing camp, certified by the president of the camp committee: E. Reif. Feldafing 28.9.1947. The collective testimony was gathered by: The engineer L. Koniuchowsky Feldafing (Bavaria). 1947–IX–(18–27).

In the autumn of 1943, the SS assumed control of the ghetto and converted it into the Kovno concentration camp. Wilhelm Göcke served as the camp's commandant. The Jewish council's role was drastically curtailed. The Nazis dispersed more than 3,500 Jews to subcamps where strict discipline governed all aspects of daily life. On October 26, 1943, the SS deported more than 2,700 people from the main camp. The SS sent those deemed fit to work to Vaivara concentration camp in Estonia, and deported children and elderly people to Auschwitz.

On July 8, 1944, the Germans evacuated the camp, deporting most of the remaining Jews to the Dachau concentration camp in Germany or to the Stutthof camp, near Danzig, on the Baltic coast. Three weeks before the Soviet army arrived in Kovno, the Germans razed the ghetto to the ground with grenades and dynamite. As many as 2,000 people burned to death or were shot while trying to escape the burning ghetto. The Red Army occupied Kovno on August 1, 1944. Of Kovno's few Jewish survivors, 500 had survived in forests or in a single bunker which had escaped detection during the final liquidation; the Germans evacuated an additional 2,500 to concentration camps in Germany.

The Soviet army liberated the ghetto on August 1, 1944.

After the Soviets occupied Kaunas, the surviving Jews were forbidden from leaving. They Soviets used Eli to dismantle factories and sent the equipment to the Soviet Union and expropriated the mill in Taurage, just as the Germans had done.

Eli realized that Stalin was as dangerous as Hitler and managed to obtain fake Polish citizenship documents so they would be allowed to leave Lithuania and go to Poland. From there he connected with contacts who took them through the Polish forests on foot into Germany to the displaced persons camp – Feldafing near Munich. The family lived in Feldafing for 2 years before moving to Canada.

Eli and Fruma gave testimony about their wartime experience in the refugee camp in Feldafing (above).

Through Eli’s brother Ben, they were sponsored to go to Canada to work on a farm in Ontario.

Feb-14-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chesshistoryinterest: <hemy>

(from Biographer Bistro)
<Feb-12-20 hemy: Recently I contacted Deena and Jeff Baikowitz, grandchildren of Eli Baikovicius (Baikowitz), who was a member of Lithuania team on Olympiad Munich, 1936. Today I received from Jeff history about his family life in Lithuania. I will publish it on the profile page of Eli Baikovicius.>

This is really, really great to have. Much thanks to Jeff Baikowitz. And thank you, hemy, for going to the trouble of publishing it here. A very interesting and harrowing story, probably similar to what your own parents went through.

It clarifies some of the questions we had in the previous comments. In relation to these; and other points:

(1) So he was born in Kaunas!

(2) <From 1924 until 1940, he lived in Taurage.> So it looks like Klaipeda was indeed allowed to recruit players from nearby areas to represent them (1936 and 1937 matches vs Liepaja and Kaunas).

(3) <From 1924 until 1940, he lived in Taurage.> Yet Bertasius says that in the 1941 Lithuanian Championship, he was of Taurage...(perhaps they hadn't caught up with the change).

(4) <Elijah/Elias/Eli Baikowitz (Baikovicius), born on the third of May 1902> Yet on the gravestone (given by Tabanus above), it says he was born 5th May 1902. I cannot say whether the family history or the gravestone is incorrect. Perhaps for historical accuracy, Jeff could be contacted to clarify this. I have done family history myself in the past and know how easy it is for such errors to creep in.

(5) <Eli kept a copy of his invitation to play in the 1936 Munich Chess Olympics from Nazi Germany> It would be very interesting to see a copy of this if Jeff is happy for it to be published. Perhaps even Edward Winter would be interested.

(6) <Eli played chess regularly with the head of the Kovno ghetto. The Head of the ghetto considered Eli to be a ‘cultured man’ and as a result he did not deport Eli or his family members to a death camp.> Chess saved the life of Eli and his family.

(7) What should the name heading on this page be?

(a) He is given as "Baikovicius" or similar in the three 1933 sources I gave above; the Klaipeda events; and also by Bertasius and Olimpbase, etc. It would seem reasonable then to suppose that name, rather than "Baikowitz" is what is was known as in his Lithuanian period.

(b) I think he would only have used the first name "Eli" after going to Canada. I think "Eli", which is the abbreviation of several names, is too imprecise for his Lithuanian period. Therefore, "Eli" as a first name goes with surname "Baikowitz"; but I think to go with "Baikovicius", a first name "Elias" or "Elijah" should be used.

(c) Which one? In Jeff's history, where "Eli" is not used, we have: <In the 1930s Leib and his son Elias had houses in both Taurage and Kaunas.> <Elias, Fruma, Berl testimony:> <After his wife and children had left the Kovno ghetto, Elijou Bajkowicz remained there for five weeks.> On the whole then, it looks like "Elias" over "Elijah".

(d) In addition, in "Latvis", 14 January 1933, as I gave above, we have "Eliass Baikoviciusa". Using google translate from Latvian to Lithuanian, I get "Eliass" equals "Elias". Whereas "Elijah" in Lithuanian becomes "Elija" in Latvian and vice versa. (And "Eli" in Lithuanian becomes "Tatad" in Latvian.) In view of this, it seems "Eliass" in the Latvian indicates "Elias" in Lithuanian.

(e) In view of the above, it seems to me this page should probably be headed up "Elias Baikovicius". Does this make sense?

Feb-14-20  hemy: <chesshistoryinterest>

<Elijah/Elias/Eli Baikowitz (Baikovicius), born on the third of May 1902> <Yet on the gravestone (given by Tabanus above), it says he was born 5th May 1902.>

The "5th May" is a mistake. It happen because is not clear what written on gravestone. By enlarging gravestone image we can see the date properly - "May 3, 1902"

https://garyperlman.com/EG/SK/Image...

<this page should probably be headed up "Elias Baikovicius".>
I agree.

Feb-15-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chesshistoryinterest: <hemy>

<The "5th May" is a mistake. It happen because is not clear what written on gravestone. By enlarging gravestone image we can see the date properly - "May 3, 1902".> You're right! Amazing the difference when enlarged. The key part of the "3" is faded away.

<I agree> I move, then, that this page be headed up "Elias Baikovicius".

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 3)
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any gratuitous name-calling of any members—including Admin and Owners—or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific player and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.
Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us


Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC