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Alexey Suetin vs Eduard Gufeld
Goglidze Memorial (1969), Tbilisi URS
Modern Defense: Pseudo-Austrian Attack (B06)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-07-05  Hesam7: Incredible game by GM Suetin. Pure fighting spirit. One can hardly imagine that the queen ending arises from a closed position like that you see after Black's 33rd move. White's play is really energetic, 34.c4 is just an example.
Jun-10-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: Suetin was awarded a special for the best endgame in the tournament for this game and rightly so.

This game deserves a place in a multiple queens collection. Has anyone made one?

Jun-10-06  hitman84: Brilliant Game!
Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 35.cxb5!?


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Shereshevsky says Original and bold. White risks his advantage to set difficult problems for Black. He could have just played 35.b3 and prepared g3-g4 but it is hard to judge his chances. 35.cxb5!? cxb5 now loses to 36.Bxb5 axb5 37.c6+

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 41.Rxf7


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the game was adjourned here and Black sealed what Shereshevsky thinks is the best move 41...Bxb4. He viewed 41...Ra8 as inferior due to 42.Rf6 Kd7 43.Bc5 "with an obvious advantage". But can Black not use 2 connected passed pawns better than this?

Stockfish 10 thinks differently. 43...Bxc5+ 44.bxc5 Ra2 45.c6+ Kc7 46.Rxe6 Rxb2 47.Rd6 Rb3+


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Now if a) 48.Kd2? Rd3+ and the b-pawn advances. Black is winning! or b) 48.Ke2 Rb2+ with a perpetual check or c) 48.Kd4 e3 49.Rd7+ Kxc6 50.Rd6+ Kc7 51.Rxd5 e2 52.Rc5+ Kd7 53.Rc1 Rxg3 = Surely Black must draw this.


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Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 43...Rc8! practically forcing the exchange of Rooks as White dare not allow ...Rc2.


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With the better Bishop and 2 connected passed pawns how would you consider your position if you exchange off your opponent's best piece, his Rook? You do have to mind the flying winger on the h-file but surely you can catch that!

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: 47...Bf8 to block the check really should not enter consideration here. Black wants the Rooks off.
Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 48....Kxc8


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But White has not given up trying to win. After 49.g4! hxg4 50.h5 Bf8 the game is very equal so White tempts the Black Bishop away instead.

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 51...e3?! a tempting but possibly losing move.


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Safer for Black would have been to get his King inside the square of queening for the h-pawn with 51...Kd7 or 51...Kd8. After 51...e3 play is forced for some way and Suetin must have seen deeply into this. After all hs is saccing the Bishop to go all out for the win.

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: 62.e6-e7


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White had to see this position when he played 49.g3-g4 and judge it winnable.

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: 63...Qd8


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...Kc7 instead is bad. 64.Qxh8 Qg4+ 65.Kf6! Qh4+ 66.Kf7 Qh5+ 67.Kf8 and White escapes the perpetual. Suetin.

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: At move 64 Shereshevsky gives an invaluable insight, "It is well known that the value of pawns increases in the ending. White has two pawns for a Bishop and can win a third with check. (Yet this is anti-positional!) The essence of the position is that, with the disappearence of the b5 pawn the scope of Black's Queen broadens, increasing his chances of perpetual check. Therefore White should play the game as if it were a pure Queen ending where the outcome is decided by King manoeuvres, and enemy pawns are used to screen off checks."

In other words, the pawn on b5 prevents Black's Queen from checking the White King on the a4-e8 and a5-d8 diagonals. This means there is shelter for the White King. And the Black Bishop is almost a bystander to the White e-pawn, playing little part in the game. The value of the e-pawn, increasing as it advances far outweighs the extra piece.

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: I'm amazed all 16 pawns live up to move 34.
Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: If 67.Qxb5+ Ka8 68.b4 Qd2! Black's Queen breaks out into the open and this gives him a draw. Suetin.


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Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: Position after 66.Qd6!


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Again the only way. If 6.Qc5+ Kb7! 67.Qxb5+ Ka7 68.Qc5+ Kb7 69.Qd6 Qg5 The Black Queen will find a perpetual. Suetin.


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Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: 67...Qc2!


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But not 67... 68.b3! Shereshevsky.

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: 69....Bxb2


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Black has eliminated 2 pawns but cannot cope with the last. Shershevsky.

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: 71...Qe4! Gufeld is resourceful in the defence.


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Suetin played 72.Qc5+! but not 72.Qd7+ Ka6 73.e8=Q Qa8+ 74.Kc7 Qa7+ 75.Kd6 Qd4+ And Black has his perpetual check.

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: 74...Qh4 is a repetition of position from move 70.


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So Suetin changes tack and tries to improve the position of his Queen, especially to take control of e4 as it is the pivot to a8, h4 and h7.

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: 79...Ka7?? Surely the losing move! Black gives c8 to the White King.


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Shereshevsky gives 80.Kc8 a '!' 79...Kb7 would have prevented that and White cannot free himself from the defensive pins.

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: 81...Kb7


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White now just has to avoid a couple of mating traps. 82.e8=Q?? Qc7#

Feb-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  manselton: 84...Bf6+ the last trap. There is still a mate on c7.


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If 85.Qxf6 Qc7#

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