chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Enver Bukic vs Mikhail Tal
"Bukic in the Pants" (game of the day Jul-15-2008)
YUG-URS (1967), Budva MNE, rd 9, Jul-??
Benoni Defense: Classical Variation. Czerniak Defense (A79)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 5 times; par: 50 [what's this?]

explore this opening
find similar games 2 more Bukic/Tal games
sac: 31.Qxc8 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can get computer analysis by clicking the "ENGINE" button below the game.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-02-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  DarthStapler: If this becomes GOTD, the pun should be "Enver's Game"
Dec-02-07  fictionist: Bukic slayed the giant Tal with Tal's style!
Jul-15-08  DeltaHawk: This game is amazing. So much risk taking involved.
Jul-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: 21...Ne8 and 22...Qd4 look like mistakes. Maybe 21...Rf8 instead?
Jul-15-08  Vollmer: If Tal is involved its gonna be a fun game win or lose .
Jul-15-08  Vollmer: Wait ... what ? I think this game illustrates the fun of chess . This is why most of us play .
Jul-15-08  Suji: I completely agree with <Vollmer>. It's games like this that keep most of us playing the game. We just have glimpses of the beauty in our games, and once in a while we have a game like this.
Jul-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  brankat: Knowing M.Tal, he must have been very happy with this game, regardless of the loss.
Jul-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Wow! Tal really did get a tactical kick in the pants in this game. Bukic's surprise 31. Qxc8!! sets up a winning double attack after the practically forced sequence leading to 34. Be6!

Tal is then forced to play 34...Rxe6, which still leaves him with a clearly lost position after Bukic's precise follow-up.

Perhaps Tal could have avoided this mess by simplifying with 26...Bxc3 27. Qxc3+ Qd4 28. Qxd4 cxd4 =, but such a drawish looking middle game was apparently not to his taste.

Jul-15-08  dehanne: <Tal really did get a tactical kick in the pants in this game.> Luckily it wasn't a fork or a skewer! ;-)
Jul-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Tal probably saw the combination coming when he played 30...Rc8. The sad thing for him was that he really didn't have any good alternatives.

For example if 30... Bxf5??, then White wins easily after 31. Rxf5 Re1+ 32. Kf2 Qe7 33. Ng5 Nf6 (33...Re5?? 34. Nf7+ ) 34. Rxf6 Qxf6+ 35. Kxe1 Re8+ 36. Ne6 .

Jul-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: A lot of fireworks in this one.

What I particularly liked was the back-to-back move sequence beginning with 33…Qe7, which is forced on black, but ironically gives black a mate in one threat with Qe2#.


click for larger view

White’s response, 34 Be6, not only blocks black’s mate threat but produces his own mate-in-one threat, Rg8#.


click for larger view

That's pretty amazing stuff!

Jul-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Both sides indeed have their parry and thrust. In the end,however,the queen was unable to stop a lethal check and the pawn was just one square shy of where it needed to be.
Jul-15-08  euripides: White's Nc4-e3 and Black's loosening f5 remind me of

Nimzowitsch vs Marshall, 1927

<patzer>'s <26...Bxc3 27. Qxc3+ Qd4 28. Qxd4 cxd4 => looks better for White to me after 29.Nxf5, when White's pieces look more active - as a result of his steady positional play.

I don't know Bukic's games but this is a real gem, against one of the greatest masters of the Benoni.

Jul-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Euripides> <26...Bxc3 27. Qxc3+ Qd4 28. Qxd4 cxd4 = looks better for White to me after 29. Nxf5.> Actually, I like White's position here with 29. Nxf5 myself. However, after 29. Nxf5 Bxf5 30. Bxf5 Nc7 31. Ng5 Nxd5 32. Be6 Nc7 = I just don't see White having any real advantage. From here, for example, play could continue 33. Bb3 Rae8 34. Rh3 Kg7 35. Rg3 Kh8 36. Rf6 Re1+ 37. Kf2 R1e2+ 38. Kg1 Re1+ 39. Kf2 R1e2+ 40. Kg1 Re1+ =, when White has nothing better than a draw by perpetual check.
Jul-15-08  euripides: <patzer> after <26...Bxc3 27. Qxc3+ Qd4 28. Qxd4 cxd4 29. Nxf5 Bxf5 30. Bxf5 Nc7 31. Ng5 Nxd5> doesn't 32.Bxd7 Rxd7 33.Nf7+ win the exchange with good winning chances ? Unless Black has something fiendish with the d pawn. (A positional approach with 31.Bxd7 Rxd7 32.Nf4 also occurred to me).
Jul-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <euripides> Time for a position check. After <26...Bxc3 27. Qxc3+ Qd4 28. Qxd4 cxd4 29. Nxf5 Bxf5 30. Bxf5 Nc7 31. Ng5 Nxd5>, this is the position I see (diagram below)


click for larger view

(32. White to move, and nothing to capture on d7).

Jul-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  fm avari viraf: A brilliant & sensational display of pyrotechnics till the very end where the ailing Tal had to surrender! The pun should be "Bukic in the pants" & "Tal in the fry pan"
Jul-15-08  euripides: <patzer> yes sorry I was looking at 29...Nxf5, but it turns out that the h6 knight is more valuable than the d7 bishop.
Jul-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: Another real cool move was 37 Rf7.


click for larger view

Notice how black cannot play 37...Qxe6 because of 38 Rxh7+!, forcing 38 Kxh7 followed by the knight fork 39 Ng5+.


click for larger view

Jul-15-08  tacite: Just wondering... what would happen if instead of 23.Nf2 white would have played 23.Bc3
Jul-15-08  Longbrow: I don’t claim to know much about opening play, and I do see some justification (certainly do not want an enemy pawn posted on d6 by the 6th move) for the immediate 4…exd5, but is this a best- by- test forced opening response? It appeared to have significant ramifications to Black for the rest of the game. I would truly appreciate the education from anyone.
Jul-15-08  Longbrow: Benoni, Classical, 11.f3 (A79)
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 c5 3 d5 e6 4 Nc3 exd5 5 cxd5 d6 6 e4 g6 7 Nf3 Bg7 8 Be2 O-O 9 Sorry to waste your time. White wins 46.3%
Jul-16-08  euripides: <Longbrow> In playing the Benoni, Black is usually aiming either for the kind of set up he gets here or for a more closed set up with pawns on e5 and c5. The set-up here, known as the 'modern Benoni', is probably sharper and more risky; Black gets a queenside majority and play on the long black diagonal and the e file against the e4 pawn, but if White can consolidate his strong centre is a big asset. In this game Tal's f5 breaks the White centre but leaves him with some weaknesses. Tal used this opening a lot at the start of his career and probably did more than anyone to make it respectable.
Jul-16-08  Longbrow: <euripides> I appreciate your time. It appears that the majority of the games utilizing this opening (at least on this website) result with a strong White attack on the Black King’s side of the board. Black usually seems to be in a positional disadvantage (for some of the reasons you stated) on the King’s side. As previously noted, it is not surprising to me that, pressure was maintained on f5-pressure is maintained on the entire Black King’s side. I see what the goal is for Black; however, it seems to me that if White plays soundly, he can maintain the advantage in this opening. This opening certainly lends itself to spirited and uncommon play-perhaps explaining some wins for Black. Apparently this opening has lost some popularity.
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any member Iincludinfgall Admin and Owners or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. If you think someone is an idiot, then provide evidence that their reasoning is invalid and/or idiotic, instead of just calling them an idiot. It's a subtle but important distinction, even in political discussions.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
Budva 1967
from Favorite Games from (1960-1979) by wanabe2000
Random interesting games
by Lutwidge
Chess Informant Best Games 1
by koinonia
31. Qxc8!! sets up 34. Be6! +-
from Double Attack by patzer2
Game 35
from # Chess Informant Best Games 1-100 by Qindarka
Enver Bukic (1937-)
from Player of the day: notable game III by nikolaas
1. d4!
by Benjamin Lau
UNIVERTAL
by Gottschalk
1. d4! Compiled by Lau
by fredthebear
Volume 4 - 5th Place - 30 pts.
from Chess Informant: 640 Best Games - Part 1 by TheAlchemist
Interesting Games
by Easy Point
Chess Informant Best Games 1
by Nimzophile
Chess Informant Best Games 04
by morphynoman2
a good parry and thrust-back-to- back mate threats
from Gorney Park by kevin86
a79
from favorite games according to opening a00-a99 by mirage
110
from Yugoslav Chess Triumphs, Part 1 by Chessdreamer
Game collection: 101
by cgrob
Chess Informant Best Games 1
by Olanovich
Game of the day 2
by vikinx
July 15: Bukic in the Pants
from Game of the Day 2008 by Phony Benoni
plus 0 more collections (not shown)


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC