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Ian Rogers vs Peter Acs
"Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood" (game of the day Apr-08-2009)
Corus (2003), Wijk aan Zee NED, rd 3, Jan-14
English Opening: King's English. Two Knights' Variation Smyslov System (A22)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-08-09  whatthefat: A very complex middlegame.
Apr-08-09  brucejavier: Another strong game by the GM Ian Rogers from Australia, he really had to think deep to come threw with the whole point. Unfortunately not active anymore due to health problems.
Apr-08-09  hzwk6j: Peter Acs has also kind of retired since. He won the junior world championship in 2001. In 2003 Jan he reached his maximum ELO (2623). Since then he plays only in the Hungarian team championship and already started a career away from the chessboards.
Apr-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: An unusual double rook sacrifice in order to open lines (especially diagonals) against the black king. Those two bishops did an incredible job.

Anyone decipher the pun?

Apr-08-09  Open Defence: hehehe Mr Roger....
Apr-08-09  WeakSquare: the pun??
Apr-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eisenheim: Mr. Roger's Neighborhood was a very popular children's show in the United States
Apr-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Travis Bickle: <WeakSquare: the pun??> Yo Obama maybe this clip of a popular children's show will enlighten you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1FC...

Apr-08-09  tivrfoa: white did an incredible job
Apr-08-09  kkshethin: Is there any good defence then following to conclude the game 32... Qc1+ 33.Ke2 Qc4+ 34.Kf2 Qxa2+ 35.Kf3 Qg8 36.Bd5 Rb8 37.Qc6 Rc8 38.Qxf6+ Qg7 39.Qxg7# 1-0
Apr-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I was amused how white's king gobbles up the knights on his first row-looked like "king pacman"-lol
Apr-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: What did you expect for a pun? Acs murderer?
Apr-08-09  Notagm: What if 14...exd3?
Apr-08-09  Notagm: Also, how about 18...Nxb2, followed by 19...Nxd3, or even 19...Bxd3?
Apr-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Ian stroke with an Acs.
Apr-08-09  WhiteRook48: what a lame pun!
"White Acsing Strange"
"Roger, stop doing that! Roger, don't Acs like that!"
Apr-08-09  TheChessGuy: It's pronounced "Ash," not "Axe." Cs is a digraph in Hungarian, and the surname Acs means "Carpenter." Of course, the proper name order is Acs Peter, but that's splitting hairs.
Apr-08-09  Agent Bouncy: I'm not sure if that's right, Chessguy. I think Hungarian "cs" is the equivalent of English "ch" not "sh".
Apr-08-09  mccarthpm: I played IAN ROGERS ina simultanous at the AMP centre in sydney when he was 15yrs old in 1976-he was tipped to be australia's first grandmaster and became so-his best games are agaist zhong zhang and his specialty was the scandinavian opening-he has played karpov/kasparov with no succes but was of their vintage
Apr-09-09  qwwqwwq: 14...exd3 also caught my attention Notagm,

I calculated 15. cxd5 Rxe2 16. Qf4 Ne7 17. Bxg7! Kxg7 18. d6 Be6 19. dxe7 Qxe7

Black has a passed pawn but suffers an exposed king, probably favoring white

Jan-14-10  elohah: I have put two stars to this interesting tactical game, and have annotated it rather extensively.

Notee to Rogers-Acs Wijk-2003

7 Wasn't White's formation here blown
out by the game Christiansen-Epishen?
As well as one of the games from the
Peters-Silman match. Let's see what
Maestro Rogers has to contribute.

13 Suspiciously putting the Q on an
unguarded square should put Black on
guard for some home cooking from
Rogers...

14! If 14...ed 15 cxd5 dxe2 16 Re1
Qd7! (16...Ne5? 17 Qf4! Nd3 18 Qxf5
Nxb2 19 Qc2 wins.) 17 Bc3 Ne5 18 Rxe2
f6 should be better for White with
the bishops and passed d-pawn, and
18...Nc4?? getting bonked by 19 Qd4!

As far as 15...Rxe2 (after 14...ed
15 cxd5), was it something like
16 Qf4! Now if 16...Bg6? 17 dxc6
Rxb2 18 cxb7 Rb8 19 Rac1, right off
hand, I think we can point to White's
passed pawn being the more dangerous,
e.g.: 19...d2? 20 Qxb8!, etc.
After 16...Rxb2 right away, 17 Qxf5
Nb4 18 a3 Nc2 19 Rad1 Nxa3 20 Qxd3
Nb5 21 d6! Rb8 (on 21...Qd7, 22 Rfe1
looks tough.) 22 d7, Black is
completely choked, and after 22...a6
23 Rfe1 Nc7 24 Qc3 Rb5 25 Qxc7! -
I can't tell; are we still in Roger's
home preparation?
So after 15...Rxe2, I think it was
16 Qf4!, rather than 16 Qc3? Ne5
17 f4? Rc8 18 Qd4 Rcc2!

Jan-14-10  elohah: How about 14...Ndb4---? Then 15 d4
Nd3 16 Bc3, mousing the knight, looks
good, until you see 16...Bg4.
After 17 d5? Nce5 18 Bxe4 Nf3+ 19 Bxf3
Bxf3 20 Nd4 Be4 (Xc4) leaves Black in
the game. 17 Bxe4 Rxe4 18 Qxd3 Rxe2
19 f3 Bxf3 20 Qxf3 Re7 is identical
to a continuation I give later, with
one difference: The Q's remain on, so
Black is OK here.
17 f3 is right. AFter 17...exf3,
White has two lines: 18 Bxf3 or
18 Rxf3!?
Looking at this second line first
will clarify matters: 18...Bxf3?
(right away) is out. After 19 Bxf3,
Black just dumps his knight (and the
position after 19...Nde5 20 dxe5
Qxd2 21 Bxd2 Rxe5 is better for
White). 18...Rxe2 isn't a tremendous
problem either. After 19 Qxd3 Bxf3
20 Bxf3 Re7 21 Bd5. The loss of the
exchange is negligible with bishops
like these.
The problem with 18 Rxf3!? is
18...Ndb4! With the knight out,
...Bxf3 is now on, and so White's
18 Rxf3!? is looking too committal.
He may have to lunge with 19 d5,
and the complications of this favor
Black:
A couple of sample lines:
19...Ne5 20 Re3 Nxc4! (Right, tho
seemingly losing to 21 Qd4, with
Rxe8+ and Qxg4) 21 Qd4 Qb6! with
Black better. Suprisingly, 20...Qb6?
right away is wrong. After 21 Bd4!
Nxc4 22 Rxe8+ Rxe8 23 Qc3 Qd6 (or
c7; or ...23...Qb5 24 a4 Qa6) 24 Nf4
with White better.
After 19...Ne5 20 Rf4 is an improve-
ment, yet Black can improve on
19...Ne5 with: 19...Qb6+! 20 Nd4
Bxf3, just winning an exchange, or
20 Kh1 Rxe2! 21 Qxe2 Nd4 22 Qe5 Nbc2
23 Rd1 f6, and ...Bxf3.
After 18 Rxf3!?, since Black also
has 18...Qe7!, when White has nothing
better than 19 Qxd3 Qxe2 20 Qxe2 Rxe2
21 Rf2, is finally points to the
correct line for White after 14...Ndb4
15 d4 Nd3 16 Bc3 Bg4 17 f3 exf3:

18 Bxf3! Bxf3 (forced; 18...Bf5?
19 Bxc6) 19 Rxf3 Qe7! (forced)
20 Qxd3! (Best. Not 20 Kf1? Ndb4
21 d5 Ne5 22 Rf4 Na6 23 Re4 Nf3!)
20...Qxe2 21 Qxe2 Rxe2 22 Rf2 Rae8
23 Raf1! f6 24 Rxe2 Rxe2 25 Rf2 Re8.
White is better in this ending.

Jan-15-10  elohah: 15...On 15...Ndb4 16 Qc3 Qf6 17 d4
Bd3 18 Rae1 Bxe2 19 Rxe2 Nxa2?
20 Qb3 Nab4 21 d5 wins. 16...f6 isn't
much better: 17 d4 Bd3 (17...Nd3
18 fe) 18 Rae1 Bxe2 19 Rxe2 ef+
20 Rexf2 etc. Black's move wishes to
stop this easy d4 move from White,and
this good plan could have led to an
advantage for Acs.
Jan-15-10  elohah: 16...!

19...I believe 19...Qd7! is better.
If then 20 Rfd1? Nf2, so maybe 20 Rfb1
b6 21 Rb5 Nac5, but Black is much
better.

27!! 27 Bxf1 is solid enough, but
Roger's continuation is much stronger.

34 An amazing game!

Jun-19-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  GrahamClayton: Bizarre position after 28...♘xe1, with both black knights side by side on the first rank:


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