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Peter Svidler vs Alexander Morozevich
Russian Championship Superfinal (2007), Moscow RUS, rd 8, Dec-27
Sicilian Defense: Najdorf Variation. English Attack (B90)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

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Given 16 times; par: 47 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-27-07  tal lover: Moro strikes again
Dec-27-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: Position after 30.Kc2:


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<30...Qa4+>, <Bxe3> and <Nd4+> should all lead to a draw by repetition with accurate play by both sides (e.g. 30...Bxe3 31.Rxg6+ Kf8 32.Qxe6 hxg6 33.Qxd6+ Kg7 34.Qd8 Rf8 35.Qe7+ Rf7 36.Qd8 etc.); but Nd4+, which was played by Moro, gave Svidler the most chances to go wrong.

<32.c4??> loses, whereas <32.Rg2!> with threats of Qc8+, c4 and f4 leaves Black with nothing better than forcing a draw by 32...Qa4+ 33.Kb1 Qb5+ 34.Kc2 (or 34.Ka1 Qxd3 35.Qc8+ Rf8 36.Qe6+ Rf7 37.Rxg5 Qxc3+ 38.Kb1 Qd3+ 39.Ka1 Qc3+) etc. However, it's not so easy to spot, especially in time trouble.

<38...Bf6!> is both a decisive attacking move and a saving defensive move (protecting from mate on h8 after Rxg6+).

Dec-27-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: What's wrong with <25.Rxg5>? After <25...Nh3 26.Rxg6+ hxg6 27.Qg3 Nf4 28.Be3>


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the position seems balanced to me.

Dec-27-07  Riverbeast: Morozevich is tearing through these guys like a knife through butter...I'm loving it!
Dec-27-07  TheBB: <whiteshark> Nothing, I believe. Rxg5 is all right.
Dec-27-07  Jim Bartle: Though he only blew the draw at the very end, I think Svidler erred earlier in sticking his bishop on b6, or at least by leaving it there. The queen was in effect immobilized, having to defend the bishop, which permited Bxg5.
Dec-27-07  controlaltdelete: in the final position...cant white defend with Rf4? (im thinking of variations that include Qc8, for example: Be5 Qc8+ Kg7 Rxf7+ Kxf7 Rxh7+...?)
Dec-27-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <controlaltdelete> 39.Rf4 loses to d3+ 40.Rxf6 Qc3+! 41.Kb1 Qxf6; White can keep playing on for a while, but his position is hopeless. Same goes for 39.e5 dxe5 (stronger than 39...Bxe5 40.f4 Bf6 41.Qb3/d3).
Dec-28-07  ahmadov: Wow, Moro wins this one as well!!! Bravo!
Dec-28-07  armtwister: 16.Rg2 was a bad novelty i think! And in these type of positions with black knight on h5,i think the best idea is to play f4,as shown by Karjakin vs E Alekseev 1-0 27 2007 World Chess Cup or play positionaly like Anand did against Moro himself in WCC Anand vs Morozevich 1-0 56 2007 FIDE World Championship Tournament .Svidler just mixed it all up and in a drawish position,blunderd and lost!
Dec-28-07  Shams: <armtwister> you really think these ...Nh5 sicilians are drawish? interesting. certainly the f3-f4 plan is direct and effective and worked great in the Karjakin game you mentioned: Karjakin vs E Alekseev, 2007

Morozevich's 15...Qc7 threatens ...d5!, so there is at least a point to 16.Rg2, overprotecting c2. I wonder what crafty thinks of the immediate 16.f4. Taking twice on f4 looks a little more comfortable for white; can black go ahead with 16...d5 anyway<?>


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17.fxe5 dxe4 looks safe for black to me. full disclosure, I routinely lose on both sides of this variation...

Dec-28-07  Atkins: <armtwister: 16.Rg2 was a bad novelty> How you can say that? 16.Rg2 is very subtle. The main point of that move is to cover c2 but also to double the rooks on d or g files. It hides a potential Bh3 too. As I said yesterday I'm not convinced by Svidler's plan after Morozevich's 16...f6!? (f5) Why not then gxf? This morning I put it on a board and found nothing wrong on White side. 17...Rxf6 (Of course not 17...Bxf6? (xd6) but lets try 17...Nxf6?! 18.f4! and 18...Kh8 looks dynamicaly balanced but in fact 19.f5! gxf 20.exf5 Bxf5 21.BxNb6! (always this square d5) 21...QxB 22.Qg5 Bg4 23.RxBg4 Rg8 24.Qf5 NxRg4 25.Bd3 Nf6 26.Nd5 (How much crucial is this square...) White wins) 18.Qf2 (Eyal's suggestion in live. Yesterday I was intrigued by 18.Bg5 Rxf3 19.Be2 I failed to see the consequences of RxNc3!) 18...Nc4 19.BxNc4 BxBc4 (Now 19...QxBc4 20.Bg5 Rf7 21.BxB RxB 22.Rxd6 Nf4 23.Rh2 there is not enought compensation for the pawn) 20.Nd5 BxNd5 21.RxB Rcf8 22.Nd2 White is a bit better because his Nd2>Be7 and Be3>=Nh5. To be frank, instead of Moro's 16...f6!? yesterday I suggested a lemon 16...Rfd8?! (16...d5!? was my idea but 17.BxNb6 QxB 18.exd Rfd8 19.Qe1! as 19...Bh3 20.Re2 BxB 21.QxB Ng3 there is 22.Qf2) 17.Qf2 Na8 but this morning I saw 18.Rh2 with Bh3-Bg4 and h5. <Just to say how much 16.Rg2 was interesting.>
Dec-28-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Atkins: Of course not [17.gxf6] 17...Bxf6? (xd6) but lets try 17...Nxf6?! 18.f4! and 18...Kh8 looks dynamicaly balanced but in fact 19.f5! gxf 20.exf5 Bxf5 21.BxNb6! (always this square d5) 21...QxB 22.Qg5 Bg4 23.RxBg4 Rg8 24.Qf5 NxRg4 25.Bd3 Nf6 26.Nd5 (How much crucial is this square...) White wins >

Nice line - though Black seems to hold after 20...Bf7 instead of Bxf5. So 19.h5! first might be better, and if Black captures on h5 then f5 becomes even stronger. E.g. 19...Nxh5 (19...gxh5 seems relatively best) 20.f5 gxf5 21.Bxb6 Qxb6 22.Qh6 Bf7 23.Nd5! (again...) Qd8 24.Be2 and White wins; but not 23.Be2 immediately, because then Black has 23...Rg8! 24.Rxg8+ Rxg8 25.Bxh5 Bg5 - whereas after 23.Nd5 Qd8 Black can't recapture on g8 with the rook, since the queen gets in the way.

Dec-30-07  Ulhumbrus: 14...g7-g6 disturbs the King side pawns, but Black's N on h5 prevents White's h pawn from advancing to h5. 15 f4 prepares to remove this N. After 15 f4 ef 16 Bxf4 the capture ...Nxf4 remoces the obstacle to the pawn advance h4-h5.
Jan-01-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  minasina: http://chesspro.ru/chessonline/onli... (Translated: http://www.google.com/translate?u=h... The board is not functioning at the translated page.)
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