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Fischer vs FIDE, 1975
Fischer forfeits.

After defeating Spassky in 1972, Bobby Fischer stopped playing serious chess, turning down several lucrative offers to play in public.

Fischer, circa 1971 In 1974, Fischer's challenger was decided: he was an emerging Russian chess superstar, Anatoly Karpov, who had defeated Korchnoi in the candidate's final to earn him the right to challenge Fischer.

In September, 1973, Fred Cramer, Vice President (Zone 5) of FIDE, proposed that the world championship match be decided on 10 wins, draws not counting. He also proposed that the champion retains his title if it were a 9-9 tie. This became known as the Cramer proposal. Fischer telegrammed FIDE informing them that they should adopt the Cramer proposal.[1]

Opponents of the proposal argued that the unlimited format is impractical, and that the 9-9 rule affords the champion too great of an advantage. Proponents claimed that the proposal would encourage exciting chess (because draws do not count) and that it more accurately determined the better player. Fischer argued the merits of the proposal in a 1974 letter to FIDE:

The first player to win ten games, draws not counting, with unlimited number of games wins the match. If the score is nine wins to nine wins, draws not counting, the champion retains title and the match is declared drawn with the money split equally. Versus the old system of the best of 24 games wins the match (12.5 points) and if 12-12 the match is drawn with the champion retaining the title and prize fund is split equally. Draws do count in this system.

The unlimited match favors the better player. This is the most important point, because in the limited game system the match outcome can turn on a very low number of wins, giving the weaker player a chance to "luck out." Also, in the limited game system the player who takes a game or two lead has an advantage out of all proportion. This creates an added element of chance. The player who wins the match should be the player who plays best over the long run, not the player who jumps off to an early lead.[2]

In June, 1974, the FIDE Congress in Nice approved the 10-win regulation and the elimination of draws from the scoring, but imposed a 36-game limit and rejected the 9-9 proposal. On June 27, 1974, Fischer sent a telegram from Pasadena, California to the FIDE Congress:
As I made clear in my telegram to the FIDE delegates, the match conditions I proposed were non-negotiable ... FIDE has decided against my participation in the 1975 World Chess Championship. I therefore resign my FIDE World Championship title.

In March, 1975, an extraordinary FIDE Congress was held in Bergen, Netherlands, and it was agreed to have an unlimited number of world championship games, but still refused the 9-9 rule (32 votes for it, and 35 votes against it). [3] Fischer, unwilling to budge, refused to defend his title.

In Karpov's memoirs he recounts how he was disappointed to not have a chance to become champion in the traditional manner:

I don't know how Fischer feels about it, but I consider it a huge loss that he and I never played our match. I felt like the child who has been promised a wonderful toy and has it offered to him but then, at the last moment, it's taken away.[4]

On April 3rd, 1975, Karpov was declared the 12th World Champion.

FOOTNOTES

  1. Robert James Fischer, by Bill Wall
    2 Bobby Fischer letter to FIDE, 1974
    3 Robert James Fischer, by Bill Wall
    4 Karpov on Karpov: Memoirs of a Chess World Champion, by Anatoly Karpov, Athenuem Press, 1992.

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 135 OF 135 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-09-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: IM's are entitled to an opinion? I never knew that.
Nov-09-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <<<harrylime> <Keypusher> and <AylerKupp> are MEGA FISCHER HATERS> Not at all (at least in my case), it's just that you and other Fischer fanboys think that anyone that is not 110% in awe and love of Fischer is automatically a Fischer hater. And that is simply not the case.

I've said it before and I'll say it again:

(1) I have nothing but admiration for Fischer the chess player. His games were some of the finest examples of clarity that I have ever seen. And his results speak for themselves. My only regret is that we were not able to admire more of them due to his premature retirement from chess at the peak of his career.

(2) I have nothing but contempt for Fischer the person. The way he treated many of his friends and those he supported him was abominable, not to mention his opinions later in his life. That doesn't mean that he acted in an abominable fashion all the time, it's just that he did it far too often for my liking.

And, as I've also said before, I can differentiate between the two and keep them separate.>

I wouldn't cop to being a Fischer hater, but I think in the past I let how I felt about him as a person affect how I saw him as a chessplayer. Or, more accurately, I got into fights with people who I thought admired him to excess, and as a result I started edging towards denigrating his abilities, at least slightly. That's the problem with getting into sustained arguments, you wind up saying things you wish you hadn't said. At least that tends to happen to me.

The way you feel about Fischer, AK, is how I ought to feel, and hopefully now I do. I've even gotten where I feel a little more sympathy toward him as a person, since his circumstances were not good.

Nov-09-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Truth to tell, <AK> must clearly have the last word on every topic, all the time--the exchange with Fischer himself at Santa Monica 1966, as nothing else, demonstrates this compulsion beyond cavil.
Nov-09-19  Cibator: Neither of the articles cited by <Sally Simpson> and <AylerKupp> seem to take account of the players' physical conditions. And on that count I believe you would definitely have to declare: "advantage Fischer".

Karpov in 1975 was still small and very lightly built, with suspect stamina (against Korchnoi the previous year he faded pretty badly towards the end, for just that reason - and we all remember the epic match with Kasparov in 1984, don't we?).

Fischer on the other hand would surely have got himself back to the peak bodily fitness he displayed in the famous photos taken at the Grossingers resort in 1972. Another reason why the "ten wins" format would have favoured him.

Nov-09-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Fischer on the other hand would surely have got himself back to the peak bodily fitness he displayed in the famous photos taken at the Grossingers resort in 1972.>

Uhhh...

https://www.newspapers.com/clip/190...

Any statement involving Bobby Fischer in 1975 should not include the word "surely" unless followed immediately by "unpredictable."

Nov-09-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Karpov also did a disappearing act at the finish of the match in Baguio, up 5-2 after 27 games, only to drop three of the next four. For all his immense will power, Karpov's physical reserves could only last so long.
Nov-09-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

Hi AylerKupp,

I have seen before the March 2018 link you gave, I added the date to my link because it is the most recent article on this merry-go-round.

This is the first time I've seen the two different formats examined.

It has not shifted my opinion. I'm a Fischer in 1975 but Karpov in 1978 man.

That is me ignoring ratings and the supposed Fischer 'rustiness'. Fischer had lay off's in the past and he came back stronger, and we know he was looking at current games, even spotting missed wins v Karpov. Karpov vs C W Pritchett, 1974 (kibitz #6)

When I finally get around to writing 'The History of Chess for the Club Player.' I'll mention in 1993 there were three World Champions. Kasparov (PCA), Karpov (FIDE) and Bobby Fischer.

***

Nov-11-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <plang> The things you learn by visiting <chessgames.com>!
Nov-11-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime: Fischer would have ROASTED the SOVIET elite CHESSMACHINE in 1975 also .. like he did in 1972.

Just sayin loike. 😎

Nov-11-19  WorstPlayerEver: As it comes to chess, I'm a Karpov fan :)
Nov-11-19  nok: <Fischer would have ROASTED the SOVIET elite CHESSMACHINE in 1975 also .. like he did in 1972.>

Spassky was far from a machine. Good luck trying the same shenanigans with Karpov.

Nov-11-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime: <<nok: <Fischer would have ROASTED the SOVIET elite CHESSMACHINE in 1975 also .. like he did in 1972.> Spassky was far from a machine. Good luck trying the same shenanigans with Karpov.>>

Karpov was red carpeted thru to Bobby by the corrupt Soviet elite who ran chess back then .

Boris , a motivated Boris, would beat a primed Karpov.

Nov-11-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: <harrylime: Boris , a motivated Boris, would beat a primed Karpov.>

So why didn't he?
<Classical games: Anatoly Karpov beat Boris Spassky 14 to 1, with 23 draws.> https://www.chessgames.com/perl/che...

Nov-11-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime: <<Diademas: <harrylime: Boris , a motivated Boris, would beat a primed Karpov.> So why didn't he?
<Classical games: Anatoly Karpov beat Boris Spassky 14 to 1, with 23 draws.> https://www.chessgames.com/perl/che...
>

Generational gap between the two .. the 2nd world war making this gap much larger ...

Plus Karpov was a Soviet fave at the time ( ask Gary lol ), so he was fast tracked to play Bobby.

Boris was a chess natural genius who motivated with the right context would destroy Karpov.

Nov-11-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: Mrs. Karpov on post-war rations?
Nov-11-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Diademas> So why didn't he? <Classical games: Anatoly Karpov beat Boris Spassky 14 to 1, with 23 draws.>

By now you should know that mere facts do not influence <harrylime>'s opinion in the slightest. And I don't know what kind of "right context" would motivate Spassky's "natural genius" sufficiently to overcome the 14-year "generational gap" between him and Karpov.

Of course, if Fischer had played Karpov in their 1975 WCC match and lost, I'm sure that <harrylime> would have blamed that on their 4-year "generational gap".

Nov-11-19  WorstPlayerEver: Corr: 8 year
Nov-12-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: <AylerKupp: <<Diademas> So why didn't he? <Classical games: Anatoly Karpov beat Boris Spassky 14 to 1, with 23 draws.>
By now you should know that mere facts do not influence <harrylime>'s opinion in the slightest.>

There is always the slim possibility that I have been privy to that information for a long time, and only a perverted sense of humour drives me to pulling his leg from time to time.

Nov-12-19  WorstPlayerEver: Look at 1:12

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=LSWau...

Bobby's just all awkwardness. He's taken out of his comfort zone. Notice that Hope deliberately states - after seeing Bobby can't give himself any relief: "Ok,I'll give you a break!"

Bobby seems not to enjoy himself at all; he's just too awkard, answers like an automaton running through the scene much too fast.

It's not hard to fathom Bobby wanted to get out of there as quickly as possible.

Nov-12-19  WorstPlayerEver: PS notice when they take place behind the table. Hope just sits down reaching for his schnapps, but Bobby is shuffling with his chair before he manages to place his big butt on it.

It's as hilarious as it's awkward. The chair is way too low for Bobby.

Nov-12-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Diademas> There is always the slim possibility that I have been privy to that information for a long time, and only a perverted sense of humour drives me to pulling his leg from time to time.>

Shoot! When will I ever learn? And where did you acquire that perverted sense of humor? I WANT SOME !!!! Were you born with it or did you take classes? If the latter, where? I would like to (and need to!) take some.

Nov-12-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <WorstPlayerEver> It's as hilarious as it's awkward. The chair is way too low for Bobby.>

It could be that the floor is way too high.

<Diademas> How am I doing?

Nov-12-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: I thought Fischer was great in the skit with Bob Hope. He's not a show business performer, and it's not as easy as most actors make it seem.
Nov-12-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

Hi Saffuna,

I too thought Fischer was good and played his part well considering as you say he was not actor. He followed the script perfectly his timing was good, his delivery was bit static but that was to be expected and he did not mind at all a gag or two being aimed at himself. 'There are no cameras are they?'

It appears some do not seem to realise it was a put on, a piece of well scripted comedy.

***

Nov-12-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <saffuna> Yes, good actors are like top-level GMs, they both make it look easy when it's not.
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