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Robert James Fischer
Fischer 
The Championship Season: Bobby Fischer in 1972.  
Number of games in database: 1,101
Years covered: 1953 to 1992
Last FIDE rating: 2780
Highest rating achieved in database: 2785

Overall record: +434 -87 =248 (72.6%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games in the database. 332 exhibition games, blitz/rapid, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Sicilian (201) 
    B90 B32 B88 B44 B77
 Ruy Lopez (128) 
    C92 C69 C95 C97 C98
 French Defense (81) 
    C19 C18 C11 C16 C15
 Ruy Lopez, Closed (79) 
    C92 C95 C97 C98 C89
 Caro-Kann (52) 
    B11 B10 B18 B13 B14
 French Winawer (48) 
    C19 C18 C16 C15 C17
With the Black pieces:
 Sicilian (125) 
    B92 B99 B90 B97 B93
 King's Indian (117) 
    E80 E62 E97 E60 E67
 Sicilian Najdorf (83) 
    B92 B99 B90 B97 B93
 Nimzo Indian (23) 
    E45 E46 E40 E43 E34
 Grunfeld (20) 
    D79 D86 D98 D80 D83
 English (18) 
    A16 A15 A10 A19
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   D Byrne vs Fischer, 1956 0-1
   R Byrne vs Fischer, 1963 0-1
   Fischer vs Spassky, 1972 1-0
   Fischer vs Myagmarsuren, 1967 1-0
   Fischer vs Fine, 1963 1-0
   Fischer vs Benko, 1963 1-0
   Letelier vs Fischer, 1960 0-1
   Fischer vs Petrosian, 1971 1-0
   Fischer vs Tal, 1961 1-0
   Spassky vs Fischer, 1972 0-1

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: [what is this?]
   Spassky - Fischer World Championship Match (1972)

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   US Championship 1957/58 (1957)
   US Championship 1963/64 (1963)
   Stockholm Interzonal (1962)
   Netanya (1968)
   Buenos Aires (1970)
   Skopje (1967)
   US Championship (1966)
   Rovinj/Zagreb (1970)
   Palma de Mallorca Interzonal (1970)
   Havana Olympiad Final-A (1966)
   Vinkovci (1968)
   Fischer - Spassky (1992)
   Mar del Plata (1960)
   Zurich (1959)
   Havana (1965)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   -ER Fischer by fredthebear
   1964 Fischer simul exhibition tour by gauer
   Fischer vs The Russians by wanabe2000
   Match Fischer! by dwinco
   Match Fischer! by amadeus
   Bobby Fischer: Selected Games from 1955-1992 by fernando.laroca
   Bobby Fischer: Selected Games from 1955-1992 by wanabe2000
   Bobby Fischer: Selected Games from 1955-1992 by igiene
   book: Russians versus Fischer by Baby Hawk
   Russians versus Fischer by Anatoly21
   Bjelica_125 by Gottschalk
   Robert Fischer's Best Games by Patca63
   Robert Fischer's Best Games by dikaio
   Robert Fischer's Best Games by demirchess

GAMES ANNOTATED BY FISCHER: [what is this?]
   Petrosian vs Pachman, 1961
   Unzicker vs Fischer, 1962
   Korchnoi vs Fischer, 1970
   Fischer vs Julio Bolbochan, 1962
   Zukertort vs Steinitz, 1886
   >> 16 GAMES ANNOTATED BY FISCHER


Search Sacrifice Explorer for Robert James Fischer
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ROBERT JAMES FISCHER
(born Mar-09-1943, died Jan-17-2008, 64 years old) United States of America (federation/nationality Iceland)

[what is this?]

Robert James ("Bobby") Fischer was a chess prodigy born on March 9, 1943 in Chicago.

At 13, he won the stunning brilliancy D Byrne vs Fischer, 1956, which Hans Kmoch christened "The Game of the Century." At 14, he won the US Championship (1957/58), making him the youngest U.S. Champion ever.

Fischer's victory qualified him for the Portoroz Interzonal (1958). He tied for 5th-6th, which sufficed to advance him to the Candidates Tournament to decide the challenger to World Champion Mikhail Botvinnik. This made the 15-year-old Fischer the youngest candidate for the World Championship. It also made him the youngest grandmaster ever - a record that stood until Judit Polgar broke it in 1991. At the Bled-Zagreb-Belgrade Candidates (1959), Fischer finished fifth out of eight, the top non-Soviet player.

Fischer won the US Championship all eight times he played, in each case by at least a point. In the US Championship (1963/64) he achieved the only perfect score (11-0) in the history of the tournament.

He won the Stockholm Interzonal (1962) 2½ points ahead of Efim Geller and Tigran V Petrosian. This made him a favorite to win the Curacao Candidates (1962), but he only finished fourth, behind Petrosian, Geller, and Paul Keres.

In a famous article in Sports Illustrated magazine, The Russians Have Fixed World Chess, Fischer accused the Soviets of cheating: Petrosian, Geller, and Keres had drawn all 12 of the games among themselves at Curacao. Because of this, he refused to play in the next Candidates cycle. He did play in the Sousse Interzonal (1967), but left it while leading, because of a scheduling dispute occasioned by Fischer's refusal to play on Saturday, his Sabbath.

He won the Palma de Mallorca Interzonal (1970) by a record 3½ points. The following year, he shocked the chess world by sweeping the Fischer - Taimanov Candidates Quarterfinal (1971) and Fischer - Larsen Candidates Semifinal (1971) by identical 6-0 scores, the only perfect scores in the history of the Candidates Matches. He also won the first game of his Candidates final against former World Champion unknown player, giving him a modern record of 20 consecutive wins at the highest level of competition. He won the Fischer - Petrosian Candidates Final (1971) by 6½-2½ to advance to the World Championship match against reigning champion Boris Spassky. This also gave him a FIDE rating of 2785, making him at that time the highest-rated player in history.

In Reykjavik, he won the Spassky - Fischer World Championship Match (1972) by 12½-8½ to become the 11th World Chess Champion. In 1975, Fischer forfeited his title after FIDE refused to meet his conditions for a World Championship match with Anatoly Karpov. He then virtually disappeared from the public eye for nearly 20 years.

After ending his competitive career, he proposed a new variant of chess and a modified chess timing system. His idea of adding a time increment after each move is now standard, and his variant "Fischerandom" (or "Chess960") is gaining in popularity.(2)

Fischer resurfaced in 1992 to play a match against his old rival Spassky in Yugoslavia. Fischer won Fischer - Spassky (1992) 10-5 with 15 draws. The United States considered that Fischer, in playing this match in Yugoslavia, violated U.S. Treasury Department regulations that forbade transacting business with Yugoslavia. Fischer evaded authorities for twelve years until July 13, 2004, when he was arrested in Japan. On March 22, 2005, he was granted Icelandic citizenship and finally freed from Japan. He died of renal failure in Iceland on January 17, 2008 at the age of 64. Gravestone photo: http://www.sjakkfantomet.no/wp-cont....

Fischer's anthology, My 60 Memorable Games, was published in 1969. It has been described as a "classic of objective and painstaking analysis,"1 and is regarded as one of the greats of chess literature.

(1) Hooper & Whyld. The Oxford Companion to Chess. 1992

(2) Wikipedia article: Bobby Fischer

(3) User: jessicafischerqueen 's YouTube documentary of Fischer http://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...

Last updated: 2022-01-07 23:43:50

 page 1 of 45; games 1-25 of 1,101  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. D Mayers vs Fischer 1-0171953Blitz gameC33 King's Gambit Accepted
2. J Altusky vs Fischer 0-181954Offhand GameC71 Ruy Lopez
3. Fischer vs J Altusky 1-0121954Offhand GameE90 King's Indian
4. A W Conger vs Fischer 1-0121955corrE70 King's Indian
5. Fischer vs S Greene ½-½111955US Amateur ChB77 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack
6. A Humphrey vs Fischer ½-½331955US Amateur ChE61 King's Indian
7. Fischer vs K Warner 0-1281955Lincoln ch-US jrB58 Sicilian
8. W Whisler vs Fischer ½-½251955Lincoln ch-US jrE80 King's Indian, Samisch Variation
9. J Thomason vs Fischer 0-1231955Lincoln ch-US jrE90 King's Indian
10. Fischer vs D Ames ½-½281955Lincoln ch-US jrC47 Four Knights
11. Fischer vs V Pupols 0-1441955Lincoln ch-US jrC40 King's Knight Opening
12. Fischer vs F Saksena 1-0221955Lincoln ch-US jrC53 Giuoco Piano
13. Fischer vs M Pavey 0-1521956Manhattan CC chA07 King's Indian Attack
14. J Tamargo vs Fischer 0-1401956Manhattan CC chB22 Sicilian, Alapin
15. A Turner vs Fischer 1-0531956Manhattan Chess Club Semifinal BE68 King's Indian, Fianchetto, Classical Variation, 8.e4
16. Fischer vs Karl Vine ½-½361956Manhattan Chess Club Semifinal BB32 Sicilian
17. Fischer vs S Baron 1-0531956Manhattan Chess Club Semifinal BC98 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Chigorin
18. Pat Smith vs Fischer 0-1231956Casual gameC48 Four Knights
19. Fischer vs I Spector 1-0351956Casual gameB95 Sicilian, Najdorf, 6...e6
20. J R Florido vs Fischer 0-1261956Capablanca CC - Log Cabin mC50 Giuoco Piano
21. Fischer vs J A Casado ½-½481956Simul, 12bB32 Sicilian
22. A Jenkins vs Fischer 0-1181956North Carolina - Log Cabin CC mB20 Sicilian
23. Fischer vs J F Bacardi 1-0281956US Amateur chA04 Reti Opening
24. Fischer vs E Nash 0-1511956US Amateur chA05 Reti Opening
25. R Riegler vs Fischer 0-1341956US Amateur chB20 Sicilian
 page 1 of 45; games 1-25 of 1,101  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Fischer wins | Fischer loses  
 

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 143 OF 143 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-28-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  0ZeR0: My key reason for believing that mental health professionals would not have been successful with Fischer is that it seems pretty clear he did not want to help himself. He most likely did not even think there was a problem. My evidence for this is his generally hostile behavior to those who reacted negatively to his delusions, and the fact that he refused life saving treatment in the end.
Oct-28-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: BF might have turned out better with a stable home life from the get-go, two parents, normal school/social life, etc. Probably too late to change all of that as an adult.

No reason to think that would change his chess career. Kasparov and Karpov were both big ego guys, arrogant, but were still married with children. If anything BF might have been world champion longer AND still be alive today.

Oct-28-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <BF might have turned out better with a stable home life from the get-go, two parents, normal school/social life, etc.>

And you could have been a doctor....you could have been eminent....you could have had a string of abortion clinics....

Oct-28-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  Dionysius1: Separate the 2 Fischers? Why should we - they were the same man.

The same person who played the most wonderful lucid chess and had his opponents' respect across the chess board said dreadfully wicked things.

I think it's an example of how we probably shouldn't judge. Or should judge actions, not people.

Oct-29-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: If i had a string of abortion clinics we'd have one less Scarzzy...
Oct-29-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  igiene: What a legend
Nov-17-21  The Rocket: <Who is the best chess player of all time?>

Deep Blue

Nov-18-21  The Rocket: It's interesting glossing over Fischers candidate run in 71, how similar his style of play with the white pieces is at this point to a prime Capablanca. Fischer exhibits a clear preference towards simplifications into slight middle game advantages. He did this time and time again against Taimanov and Petrosian, and he always converted them, just like Capablanca did. This despite the fact that Fischer was tactically supreme, on par with Spassky (though Spassky was a superior attacker with the white pieces).

Fischer had superior positional understanding to Spassky, however, especially with the black pieces. Spassky had a tendency to overpush and underestimate positional finesses when playing with black.

Fischers penchant for simplification I believe it had more to do with his dislike for muddy waters, than tactics themselves. There's a difference of course between spotting tactics and playing the best moves in those very double edged positions.

Capablanca (who was both an e4 and d4 player in his prime) most likely had an influence on him with the white pieces.

As black, Fischer was more of a principled variation type of player, with fighting openings. He believed in his selected systems so much that he would play completely different to his white games, partly due to his dislike of draws. So if he really knew the systems, he was willing to enter the complications.

Jan-07-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: Bobby Fischer, chess engine before the chess engines: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4r...
Jan-08-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime: <<The Rocket: It's interesting glossing over Fischers candidate run in 71, how similar his style of play with the white pieces is at this point to a prime Capablanca. Fischer exhibits a clear preference towards simplifications into slight middle game advantages. He did this time and time again against Taimanov and Petrosian, and he always converted them, just like Capablanca did. This despite the fact that Fischer was tactically supreme, on par with Spassky (though Spassky was a superior attacker with the white pieces)>>

Nice post. And some interesting points you make.

We are deffo going thru a mega period of <recency Bias> at the mo ...

I think the advance in engine tech has something to do with this. Plus the explosion in India and China of chess talent.

Having played thru lots of the games of the recent Rapid and Blitz championships in Warsaw ,I can confidently say Bobby would be licking his Brooklyn lips at the oppostion on offer !

I dread to think what a Spassky or Tal would do to some of those "blitz" players ... and the mistakes they were making.

Jan-08-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime:

Nakamura is a modern day "Coffee House" player ... as indeed is Nepo...

They can swindle and squirm and bluff in blitz chess but would get torn apart in classical chess by a Smyslov or a Fischer...

Jan-08-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime: Oh and Bobby's Bio on here is still shocking in its ignorance and lack of understanding of the enormity of his chess career.
Jan-08-22  Lotus96: Harry, you seem to be stuck in a time warp with your tastes. Do you still use punch cards to give your computer instructions, or have you upgraded to Windows 3.1 by now? ☺

As for Fischer, yes of course he was a great player, and I guess we would all like to play like him. Facing him across the board must have been an intimidating experience, like someone going for a swim knowing a Great White was in the water and wondering when their legs were going to be bitten off.

However, I don't think he was the greatest ever. There are two reasons for that. The first reason is his lack of longevity as world number one. That's why Kasparov still gets my vote. Twenty years at the top, and when he retired in 2005 he was still world number one. An amazing record, especially in modern chess. Kasparov was truly "The Boss" of world chess for twenty years. Fischer never accomplished that.

My second reason is concerned with the psychological pressures on world champions. When a player becomes the world champion, he walks around with a target on his back. Everyone is gunning for him, everyone plays their best game for the chance of the glory that comes with beating him. Fischer ran away from all that and never played after winning his title. Psychologically, he couldn't handle the pressure, and that means he cannot be considered the greatest ever.

Another great player, Karpov, had this to say about those pressures:

"On my own experience, I already knew that from the Champion only top results and only first places were demanded and expected. I also knew that the Champion did not receive, together with his laurel wreath, an insurance policy against misfortune, or any sort of magic wand, which would enable him, in contrast to mere mortals, to always be in top form."

And again:

"Champions are normally criticized for the fact that they rarely play. But what are they to do? After all, in any tournament they are expected to take only first place ; second is already a failure, while third or fourth is virtually a fiasco. But this is just not possible, to win every tournament, one after another. This means that the only thing to do is not to play very often, and this is what my predecessors did. But I like playing, and I intend to play. " [Both quotes from Chess Is My Life.]

As champion, Karpov played magnificently for about ten years and didn't shirk tournament challenges. Like Kasparov, he showed he was a true champion who could bear the weight of the pressure and expectations loaded onto him. Fischer never even came close to doing that, so his position in the chess pantheon must be knocked down a place or two.

Jan-08-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime:

<<Lotus96: Harry, you seem to be stuck in a time warp with your tastes. Do you still use punch cards to give your computer instructions, or have you upgraded to Windows 3.1 by now? ☺ As for Fischer, yes of course he was a great player, and I guess we would all like to play like him. Facing him across the board must have been an intimidating experience, like someone going for a swim knowing a Great White was in the water and wondering when their legs were going to be bitten off.>>

Listen man I respect your opinions on chess and Bobby .... they are the same as most of the generation who grew up with the two K's ...

Fischer is something else ... something special. Something unique. Something great.

Let me put it this way .. Nobody I know has heard of Kasparov... even after 400 years as world champion ... Yet they have heard of Bobby Fischer.You dig ?

Jan-08-22  Lotus96: I think it's not correct to say that few people (those you know?) have heard of Kasparov. He had a very high profile for two decades. If nothing else, his matches against Deep Blue drew loads of mainstream media attention.

But hey, if you like Fischer above everyone else, you're entitled to your opinion.

By the way, are you a bona-fide original hippie, or are you giving me the run-around with all that "You dig?" stuff? Far out! Haha.

Jan-08-22  Lotus96: //The Rocket: It's interesting glossing over Fischers candidate run in 71, how similar his style of play with the white pieces is at this point to a prime Capablanca. Fischer exhibits a clear preference towards simplifications into slight middle game advantages.//

Yes, Fischer can be considered a kind of 'Capablanca on steriods', with a much greater work ethic (let's face it, Cabablanca was a bit of a lazy dog) and a style which I would characterise as aggressive lucidity.

Jan-08-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime:

<<Lotus96: I think it's not correct to say that few people (those you know?) have heard of Kasparov. He had a very high profile for two decades. If nothing else, his matches against Deep Blue drew loads of mainstream media attention. But hey, if you like Fischer above everyone else, you're entitled to your opinion.

By the way, are you a bona-fide original hippie, or are you giving me the run-around with all that "You dig?" stuff? Far out! Haha.>>

Far out man. You dig Bobby ? lol

San Francisco - Scott McKenzie
https://youtu.be/7I0vkKy504U

Jan-08-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime:

<<<<Lotus96>By the way, are you a bona-fide original hippie, or are you giving me the run-around with all that "You dig?" stuff? Far out! Haha.>>

Bobby is a Child of the Moon.

The Rolling Stones
Child Of The Moon
https://youtu.be/dlNyHtwOgsE

Jan-08-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: A good article in the latest CHESS (Jan 2022) on Bobby Fischer by James J Essinger

One point raised is that Fischer did it all on his own when he 'got good' in the mid 50's.

Compared with today there were very few good chess books about. No Computers.

No chess training schools with very strong instructors like they had in Russia where chess was financed by the state. In the West there was no chess infrastructure to support such a talent.

No rubbing shoulders with very strong team mates to bounce ideas off like they had in Russia who later on pooled their legends v him, Tal, Spassky, Geller, Petrosian...

The article finishes with a well noted up game; Fischer vs Benko, 1963

Jan-08-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime:

Hey I respect all opinions really ...

The Two K's

Capa

Morphy ( tho there was no net back then)

Saint Mag of the Fjords

I could go on .....zzzzzz lol

They are ALL great great chess players...

Fischer is my WOW factor tho ...

What he did .How he did it .. like a James Dean playin chess kinda thing ... whuppin the commies ... with games of such beauty....

Up against the world . The Chess world. And winnin ... Against ALL odds...

Bobby has the WOW factor ...

Kate Bush - Wow - ABBA in Switzerland
https://youtu.be/0PimWpl_4RY

Jan-08-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime:

Altered Images

I Could Be Happy
https://youtu.be/dfqPJp7Q7qE

Jan-17-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  technical draw: Today is the anniversary of Fischer's death in 2008. And the debate of Fischer's "greatness" continues.
Jan-17-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <td>, what are you on about? He was just another player. (rolls eyes)
Jan-17-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Dionysius1: Yep, Bobby Fischer is a great hero of mine. It's just fun to knock the publicity that surrounds him. Doesn't stop him being an all time great. The gift that keeps on giving :-)
Jan-17-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  technical draw: An interesting analysis of Bobby Fischer's personality:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zmk...

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