chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Alexander Alekhine vs Fred Dewhirst Yates
Hastings (1922), Hastings ENG, rd 4, Sep-13
Queen's Gambit Declined: Traditional Variation (D30)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 15 more Alekhine/Yates games
sac: 38...R8c3+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can get computer analysis by clicking the "ENGINE" button below the game.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-04-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: Attack was good but counter-attack was even better.:-)

Of course, Alekhine had the victory in his hands. 33.Rxd5 was not necessary as white has no reason to be afraid of Qe3+. After 33.Bg6 Qe3+ 34.Rf2 black has no satisfactory continuation. A decisive mistake was 35.Rxf7. After 35.Qg8+ Kd7 36.Qxf7+ Kc6 37.Qe6+ Kb7 38.Qxd5+ Kb8 39.Be4 Rc6 40.b4 a6 41.a4 white would have been still up.

May-06-04  ruylopez900: Beautiful play by Yates to secure his win against Alekhine. Stories say that from then on Alekhine would make a point of crushing Yates as painfully as he could when ever they played in revenge. Yates, however, knew his combination would be remembered far longer then some of his pitiful losses and didn't care. =D

Second of all I'm not sure if it was th game but it probably is. After the game Alekhine went back to his hotel room and completely destroyed every piece of furniture he could get his hands on in rage.

Sep-14-04  IT4LICO: "Second of all I'm not sure if it was th game but it probably is. After the game Alekhine went back to his hotel room and completely destroyed every piece of furniture he could get his hands on in rage." The game you are talking about is Alekhine vs Yates, 1923 i think...
Sep-14-04  RisingChamp: Yates was not a great player but he sure timed his brilliant victories well.There is a well known story of how he was invited to a prestigious tournament(I forgit where) and he won only one game-But it was against Dr Tarrasch the man who protested against Yates entry on the grounds he wasnt strong enough.
Sep-14-04  WMD: <Second of all I'm not sure if it was th game but it probably is. After the game Alekhine went back to his hotel room and completely destroyed every piece of furniture he could get his hands on in rage.> And your source would be?
Sep-15-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: <RisingChamp> It might have been at the Hamburg Tournament 1910. See Tarrasch vs Yates, 1910
Dec-03-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  sfm: Aljechine never gave up too early. A modern GM would have resigned after 41.-,Rxd3. Playing on after 49.-,Kxe5 is not even seen in average club pay. At the same time: I always admired those who could muster the energy to play one. Every now and then it pays!
May-14-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <After the game Alekhine went back to his hotel room and completely destroyed every piece of furniture he could get his hands on in rage. > Even if he didn't, it's a good story.

Ah, such a proto-rockstar tantrum.
"How does it feel/ to be on your own?/ Like a complete unknown/ Just like a Rolling Stone?"

Or, to adapt another Golden Age anecdote: "Why must I lose to this ... Yorkshireman?"

Marvelous game, though. There are tactical complexities here that push against the limit of the humanly possible, and still give silicon a brisk workout. Znosko-Borovsky was being a tad cruel when he used this as an example in his book "How Not to Play Chess".

'Do not relax in the hour of victory' was his heading -- but Yates emerged comfortably from the opening, and had the better game for several moves after White's dubious 17.Qe4?! Black had to make two or three mistakes to get into a position where White had a winning shot. First, 24...Ng4?! - weakening the b1/h7 diagonal in hope of a kingside attack - something like 24...Bd5 would keep Black's advantage. Even then, Yates could have drawn: 26...Rc5 holds the balance, but the move played 26...g5, is a 2nd error. Even then, the position is unclear until 31...Bd5? hands Alekhine a clear winning opportunity in 32.Qh7+ Kf8 33.Bg6! -- instead, 31...Qg7 holds it together, and even 31...Qxe5 probably leads to a draw.

Alekhine missed his chance, and soon blundered with 35.Rxf7? -- 35.Bxg7+ draws, while White still has winning chances after 35.Qg8+ (it's hard to see Black surviving in a line like 35.Qg8+ Kd7 36.Qxf7+ Kc6 37.Qe6+ Kb7 38.Qxd5+ Kb8 39.Be4 Rc6 40.b4 a6 41.a4 Ka7 42.b5 R6c7 43.a5! and White wins).

These days, that sort of play in supercharged tactical games leads to accusations of witchcraft, or something.

May-14-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: F.D. Yates was an accountant, who gave it up for life as a chess player and journalist. He died relatively young, poisoned by a leaky gas pipe.

A warning to all accountants.

May-14-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: Does anyone else think 52...Kd3 looks a bit cheeky? Or am I the only one who'd have played Kf2 immediately?
Sep-15-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  drleper: <OhioChessFan: Does anyone else think 52...Kd3 looks a bit cheeky? Or am I the only one who'd have played Kf2 immediately?>

Hmm, I think 52...Kd3 is just the most direct way. If the white king steps aside, the black king moves in (to c2 or e2) and escorts the pawn home (or black can delay it with g5). Not that it really matters since it's all lost anyway, but aiming to force the d-pawn through seems fastest. Surprising that Alekhine gave Yates the satisfaction of playing that much of the ending out though, as it was obviously hopeless.

Feb-11-18  Grandma Sturleigh: <Stories say that from then on Alekhine would make a point of crushing Yates as painfully as he could when ever they played in revenge.>

Whatever the stories may say, <Yates> crushed <Alekhine> in this one: Alekhine vs Yates, 1923

Jul-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fiercebadger: probably missed Rc3+
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any member Iincludinfgall Admin and Owners or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. If you think someone is an idiot, then provide evidence that their reasoning is invalid and/or idiotic, instead of just calling them an idiot. It's a subtle but important distinction, even in political discussions.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
One-Hundred-and-One of my Best Games of Chess
by Resignation Trap
Round Four
from Hastings 1922 by suenteus po 147
interesting games
by Jaredfchess
Diagram 14
from How Not To Play Chess - The Book by Veloiac
interesting games
by obrit
Alekhine's painful loss Nr.1
from Frederick Dewhurst Yates - Remarkable games by Karpova
4p vs 4p
from Endgames Kibitzed by FENfiend
ahmed883's favorite games
by ahmed883
Alekhine's painful loss Nr.1
from Frederick Dewhurst Yates - Remarkable games by Nimzophile


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us


Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC