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Thien Hai Dao vs Garry Kasparov
EUR-ASIA Rapid Match (2001) (rapid), Batumi GEO, rd 4, Sep-17
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Classical. Noa Variation (E34)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-13-11  cyclon: 23. -Rxe3+ 24.Qxe3 ( or 24.Kxe3 Re8+ 25.Kf4 g5+, over ) -Qxg4+ followed by 25. -Qxd7 winning couple of pawns plus taxes. Right?
Apr-13-11  beenthere240: The funny thing is that Kasparov oearlier gave away the whole tactical theme one move earlier with 22....Re5, which forces white to see the fork theme. ("Hmmm. What happens if I just take his rook? Oh, I see, he grabs my g pawn -- check -- and then my rook on d7.") With 23. Qf3, white simply climbs into the trap and this time can't decline the rook sac.
Apr-13-11  bachbeet: Figured the move out quickly because of all the dangers that result for white after black takes that e3 pawn. Great continuation by black with resulting further loss of material by white. Now all black has to do is check at g5 and then take the other rook. All over but the shouting after that.
Apr-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Willem Wallekers: Now that was easy for a wednesday.
Apr-13-11  BobCrisp: Straightforward themes but, for some reason, I had a hard time seeing that after 23...Rxe3 24.Kxe3 Re8+ 25.Kf4, the pawn push g5+ was there.
Apr-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: I would have never guessed that.
Apr-13-11  arnaud1959: <Marmot PFL: I knew kasparov would never miss such a sac as Rxe3+> He couldn't miss it because he prepared it. 21.-Qg2 not only protects the b7 pawn but also sets a trap. White shoud have avoided protecting the pawn with the queen. 22.Rc4 looks weird but protects the pawn without overloading the queen. White may even plan playing Qf5 and Rf4 later, putting some pressure on f7.
Apr-13-11  TheBish: Dao Thien Hai vs Kasparov, 2001

Black to play (23...?) "Medium/Easy", material is even.

Well, this was definitely easier than yesterday's! Enough said about that. I saw the winning move instantly (what else is there to look for?), but just under a minute to see the two main variations.

23...Rxe3+!

This very forcing move either wins quickly or slowly, depending on which of two main roads Black follows.

A) 24. Kxe3? Re8+ 25. Kf4 (otherwise the queen is lost) g5+ 26. Kf5 Qxf3#.

B) 24. Qxe3 Qxg4+ 25. Kf1 (but not 25. Qf3? Re8+, winning the queen) Qxd7 and Black has won two pawns. The game could continue 26. Qxa7 Qh3+ 27. Kg1 Qg4+ 28. Kf1 (but not 28. Kh2? Qh4+ 29. Kg2 Qg5+, winning the rook) Re8 and White's exposed king will soon be a problem for him. If nothing else, the passed h-pawn will soon be pushed!

Apr-13-11  TheBish: In my haste I missed the simple 26...Qb5+! which wins the rook, but I'm sure I would have look for (and found) the move in a game!
Apr-13-11  ZUGZWANG67: I missed 27...Qg5+. But generally when your Q has something like the whole world to travel and the ennemy K is naked, there must some tactical trick somewhere...
Apr-13-11  wals: At 17...Qf5 0.46.

18.Qd3 =0.02.

23.Qf3 -2.09. Best, Qf4, -=0.24.

26.Qxa7 -9.26.

Rybka 4x64.

Apr-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  eternaloptimist: I got it but I chose 26...♕d2 instead of 26...♕b5. I didn't c the potential 4 Hai to play the stupid blunder 27.♔g2?? which loses the ♖ after 27...♕g5+.
Apr-13-11  EXIDE: Got it right. Two pawns up in a rook exchange. Great ! End game win for black.
Apr-13-11  WhiteRook48: i chose 23...Rxe3+ 24 Qxe3 Qxg4+ (24 fxe3 is not legal, and 24 Kxe3 Re8+ wins the queen) 25 Kf1 Qxd7 but missed the next few moves.
Apr-13-11  sevenseaman: Quite a few solvers have mentioned 27. Kg2 as a blunder. So it is, and so what?

Our solution is over before this 'blunder'. In any case blunders from the opponent are not an option for the solver.

We tend to concentrate too much on the extraneous, if I may be forgiven the liberty of a pontification!

Here is a small puzzle; not to dare your solving expertise but just as an illustration of 'how to apply one's mind' to any puzzle. ( Not to try and teach, just revising the basics)


click for larger view

--w

White plays and mates in 2.

The Black K and e7 pawns have no move at all. The R has 3 but all lead to grief if three White attackers stay trained on three baseline squares the Black R can move to.

The c7 pawn can move. The idea for White now is to keep doing what he is already doing and yet make a move that will take advantage of the impending 'forced' Black move.

There you are. There is only one move that combines these essentials. And you may have already found it.

Apr-13-11  ChessNewbie55: Feels like a tuesday
Apr-14-11  ZUGZWANG67: <sevenseaman: Quite a few solvers have mentioned 27.Kg2(g1) as a blunder. So it is, and so what?>

And was it really a blunder? 27.Ke1 Re8+ and 28.Kd1 Qd3+ mate; or 28.Kd2 Re2+ 29.Kc3 Qxb2+ 30.Kd3 Qd2+. Naturally it takes more time for B to win the WR than it does after 27.Kg2. But as I wrote in my previous post once your Q reaches the opened field and your opponent's K is exposed, something must happen somehow...

Peace!

Apr-14-11  sevenseaman: < ZUGZWANG67: <sevenseaman: Quite a few solvers have mentioned 27.Kg2(g1) as a blunder. So it is, and so what?>

And was it really a blunder? 27.Ke1 Re8+ and 28.Kd1 Qd3+ mate; or 28.Kd2 Re2+ 29.Kc3 Qxb2+ 30.Kd3 Qd2+. Naturally it takes more time for B to win the WR than it does after 27.Kg2. But as I wrote in my previous post once your Q reaches the opened field and your opponent's K is exposed, something must happen somehow...

Peace!>

Agreed. I wrote in a general manner. But clearly you have a point. Something is bound to happen sooner or later.

Dec-27-11  notyetagm: Game Collection: FORCE YOUR OPPONENT TO HAVE LOOSE PIECES!
Dec-27-11  notyetagm: Game Collection: THE UNDERRATED REMOVAL OF THE GUARD -- Heisman

Dao Thien Hai vs Kasparov, 2001 22 ... Re8-e5! attacks f5-queen defender of d7-rook,g4-base

Dec-27-11  notyetagm: Game Collection: FORCE YOUR OPPONENT TO HAVE LOOSE PIECES!
Jan-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: <sevenseaman> Cute puzzle. =)

Kasparov did great against 4. Qc2 but less great against 4. e3 = Repertoire Explorer: Garry Kasparov (black)

Mar-04-21  Gaito: Some chess authors (like Fred Reinfeld and others) used to say that "tactics is 90% of chess". Some others said that it is only 70% or 80%, and other authors have put the figure as high as 95%. Whatever the percentage, it is an old truth that tactics is a very important ingredient of chess. Chess engines are so astoundingly strong precisely because of their fantastic strength in tactics, as compared with normal human beings. Take a look at the following position:


click for larger view

WHITE TO MOVE
The "correct" move seems to be 23.Qf4, with equality. A typical continuation would have be something like this: 23.Qf4 Re4 24.Qg3 Qxg3 25.fxg3 Rfe8 26.Rc3 Rxg4 27.Kf2 Re5 28.Rc8+ Kh7 29. Rxf7 Reg5 30.Rxb7 Rxg3 31.b4 a6 32.Rc5 with an equal ending. (Diagram)


click for larger view

Mar-04-21  Gaito:


click for larger view

But instead of playing the normal move 23.Qf4, White made a terrible tactical oversight and played 23.Qf3?? Kasparov quickly snatched his opportunity, and showing his superior tactical skill he won handsomely with 23...Rxe3+!!, a combination based on the fact that both of White's rooks are unprotected. Unprotected pieces are very often the theme of neat combinations.

Mar-05-21  Gaito: Back in 1975 during the U.S. Open in Lincoln, Nebraska I met the late GM William Lombardy, a very nice person and strong chess master. Five years later he visited Mexico and we had a very nice time discussing chess positions and talking anecdotes. In 1973 Lombardy wrote a very good chess book on tactics: "Snatched Opportunities on the Chessboard". I am sure that BIll would have liked to include this game in his book. Bill sadly passed away on October 13, 2017 and I miss him very much. Every time that I happen to see a snatched opportunity on the chessboard I remember Bill Lombardy and his book. https://www.amazon.com/Snatched-Opp...
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