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Paul Morphy vs Louis Paulsen
Double blindfold game (1857) (blindfold), New York, NY USA, Oct-20
Elephant Gambit: Paulsen Countergambit (C40)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-16-05  InspiredByMorphy: 9.Bb5+! is a great move. Usually offering two minor pieces for a rook and two pawns is not good but Morphy saw that he was already up two pawns. After 9.Bb5+ c6 10.dxc6 Nxe4 11.cxb7+ Bd7 12.bxa8=Q Bxb5 white is up 4 pawns!
Feb-27-05  Whitehat1963: Morphy's brilliant endgame technique pulls out the victory in a game that features the opening of the day.
Feb-27-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Afternoon: Great game. As I've written before, Morphy was the first chess player who played the entire game, saw the game as a whole, and developed his piece early with an eye toward what they could do late. And yes, this is superb endgame play.
Aug-11-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  BishopBerkeley: Interesting anecdote in the New York Times (1891) about Paul Morphy and Louis Paulsen :

http://sbchess.sinfree.net/Paulsen_...

"It is within memory of many New-Yorkers that at the time of the congress of 1857, but not as part of it, [Paulsen] and Morphy played together a blindfold game, sitting at opposite ends of the room, facing the wall, and calling out their moves, which were thereupon executed upon the chessboard by the auditors. At last Morphy announced a move and added 'mate in six' and after a very few seconds Paulsen declared 'I see it', while it took more minutes than Paulsen had taken seconds for the recorders at the table to work out upon the board how the checkmate was to be accomplished...."

(: ♗ Bishop Berkeley ♗ :)

Aug-25-05  THE pawn: Hahahaha, if the story's true, then I feel myself absolutely weak.
Apr-16-07  wolfmaster: Tuesday puzzle after 18...Qc7.
Apr-16-07  mrbiggs: Fritz says it's mate in 19, so I'm not sure what happened with that story.
Jan-05-08  JimmyVermeer: There is no mate in 6 at the end of this game. Morphy's final move is mate in 9. The game may continue: 54 f4 Rf2 55 Kg6 Ra5 56 bxa5 Rf1 57 f5+ Rxf5 58 Qxc6+ Ke7 59 Kxf5 Kf7 60 Qc7+ Ke8 61 Kf6 Kf8 62 Qd8#

As an aside, Philip Sergeant has an unfortunate habit of listing knight and rook moves using the side of the board the piece originated on at the beginning of the game, such as KRxKt on Black's 34th move, even though the "king's rook" is now on the queen's side of the board and the "queen's rook" is now on the king's side of the board, because of the way Black moved his rooks around earlier in the game. This is terribly confusing for people like me who have difficulty keeping track of which side of the board the rook started on after it's been moved around a bit. In my chess set, both rooks are identical. I think algebraic notation is the way to go until there is a universally accepted standard for descriptive notation.

Jan-05-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: To clear up the announced mate question
1) Morphy announced mate in 5. Not 6 or 9
2) It was not this game. Morphy's announcement was in this game: Paulsen vs Morphy, 1857

Apr-22-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  heuristic: <After 9.Bb5+ c6 10.dxc6 Nxe4 11.cxb7+ Bd7 12.bxa8=Q Bxb5 white is up 4 pawns!> which is why BLK would play 10...Nxc6 11.Qc4 Bd7 12.Ba4 Na5 instead.

<brilliant endgame technique> analysing endgames with an engine is frustrating but ... assuming that BLK is lost with 15...Bxf3, then the endgame has these issues :

19.Rxe7+ doesn't appear to be as forceful as 19.Rad1 b5 20.Rxe7+ Kxe7 21. Qc5+ Ke8 22.Ng5

ditto for 24.Qe6 versus 24.Qf5 Kc7 25.h4 Re7 26.Qc5

and 40.Qb7+ versus 40.c4 g4 41.Qb7+ Kd8 42.Qb8+ Kd7 43.a7

and 48.Qxg4 versus 48.Qc7+ Kf6 49.Qd6+ Kf5 50.Qxc6 Rg1+ 51.Rh2 Rgf1 52.Qg2

but the game is still a win for WHT and some of the above have decent rationalizations. (48.Qxg4 eliminates the mate threat, etc ...)

OTOH, 39.a6 and 44.Qb7 are sweet!

Jan-07-15  Ke2: There may be some confusion between this game and this one - Paulsen vs Morphy, 1857. That one was played as part of a blind simul, where both players sat on a stage, and Morphy announced a mate in 5. <BishopBerkley> This one may be a different story altogether, where they sat at opposite ends and Morphy announced a mate in 6.
Jan-23-16  joddon: Paul Morphy must have been a pure nutcase to play a blind game like that.....i mean he was so good he must have been crazy!!
Oct-02-16  talhal20: This game shows Morphy's competence at end game.

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