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David Janowski vs Steel
"Cold Steel" (game of the day Feb-28-2011)
Paris, (1893), ?
Queen's Gambit Declined: Three Knights Variation. General (D37)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 8 times; par: 38 [what's this?]

Annotations by David Janowski.

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-14-09  WhiteRook48: nice sacrificial attack
May-30-09  MorphysMojo: Simple, useful, un-arrogant and very clear annotations by Janowski, wish he had written more.
May-30-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Black's aim is to weaken and then attack his opponent's centre pawns.>

Steel appears to have been an early hypermodern.

May-30-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: Robert Steel ?
Feb-28-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: The usual image of Janowski is of a petulant, immature, exceedingly brilliant and forever young player, as opposed to the older, mature Emanuel Lasker. It's a bit of a shock to realize that Janowski was actually six months older than Lasker.

Qh6 seems to have been his move. This is from the beginning of his career; see Janowski vs Samisch, 1925, played near the end.

And I wonder if we have a descriptive notation typo here. After <24.d6>


click for larger view

<24...Bxc4> is laughingly bad. I think even Janowski would have played 25.dxe7, or even 25.Rxc4 in response.

So I wonder if the move was actually recorded as 24...BxP, and was interpreted as 24...Bxc4 instead of 24...Bxd6, which makes some sense. <25.Nxf6> would also be a natural response; in the score here, it's kind of iffy, isn't it?

Rather amusing that, if 26...gxh6, any move of White's knight is mate in three except for 27.Nxh7+.

Feb-28-11  selfmate: Nice game by Janowski.

I've never had much luck with hanging pawns. In my hands they become annoyingly hard to defend liabilities, and I seldom manage to make them show their dynamic potential.

Feb-28-11  sofouuk: 21 ... Rxc4! and white is busted: 22 Rxc4 Bxc4 23 Bxe6+ Qxe6 24 dxe6 Rxd4 25 Bxd4 Bxf1 26 Kxf1 Bxa3 (Rybka -1.97). Black was (unsurprisingly) also well ahead after 16 Nb1, but Janowski was right about the need for Rfd8, at least
Feb-28-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <selfmate: I've never had much luck with hanging pawns>

I know what you mean. Part of the problem, I think, is that we all want to use hanging pawns safely - ie by slowly and securely pushing them up the board like the English scrum pushing the French back.

But that rarely works. The other bloke digs his heels in and the hanging pawns get stuck, ganged up on and taken.

The real answer to hanging pawns seems to be to use them to grab space and then to find an opportunity to throw them forwards, even if it means sacrificing them for the greater good.

And that is what Janowski does here. He takes risks with his centre pawns and allows them to be liquidated. But in return his pieces flood into the black kingside for a lethal mating attack.

Feb-28-11  Draughtexcluder: Looks so simple up to move 18. Then the calculation comes into play and you see that they are not Patzers.
Feb-28-11  Gouvaneur: Very inspiring game by Janowski. His central pawns are defended well and once the pawns can go forward, it becomes very dangerous for black. Pretty Queen sac in the end.
Feb-28-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <phony benoni> I'm sure you're right about 24....Bxd6. Good eye!
Feb-28-11  KingV93: I like how White attacks the important parts of Blacks army with simple and direct moves. 18.Ne4, 20.Qd4, 21.Bg4..The postion looks somewhat even prior to Whites 18th move but from there on he conducts a thorough demolition of Blacks relatively sound looking position.

What if 24...Rxd6 giving the exchange for a pawn and to blunt the attack? after running through some continuations quickly I don't see a forced win for White.

<Once> "by slowly and securely pushing them up the board like the English scrum pushing the French back. " lol, that is certainly the case, made my morning.

Feb-28-11  abstract: stainless steel
Feb-28-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Mate either comes from the queen and knight or two bishops.
Feb-28-11  capanegra: Nice game, and typical Janowski style. This game is going into my "Janowski's Jans" collection!
Feb-28-11  kelu: @luzhin if 26 ... Bd3 27. Nxh7 then...Nd4! I don't see force mate (but interesting games to play !) 27 Ne8! is better i guess
Feb-28-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Ba6 fez in? Case cafes I r8ook makes a pipeline what it was too late. Picture thnis a lob law alloy fears be6 do neo classical forget qua4 rubles tiger enter field whicker f6 you.
Feb-28-11  benjaminpugh: Why not 25...Bxf6?
Feb-28-11  Grilo: I must agree with Phony Benoni here.

24...Bxc4?? Dear Lord this deserves a third and maybe a fourth question mark, which is clearly not matching Steel's calibre.

Clearly the game was registered as 24...BxP and misinterpreted, when the actual move has been 24...Bxd6, justifying Janowski notations "This merely plays into White's hands." An immediate, unthought response to 24.d6, probably because of time pressure.

But, hey, without the actual penwritten game, who knows?

Feb-28-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <benjaminpugh: Why not 25...Bxf6?>

Fritz finds this: 25... Bxf6 26. Bxf6 Bxe6 27. Bxg7+ Kxg7 28. Qg5+ Kf7 29.Qe7+ Kg6 30. Qxe6+ Kg7 31. Rxc8

Feb-28-11  WhiteRook48: 26 Qh6 is a nice shot
Feb-28-11  sevenseaman: A great game; a wonderful puzzle at 26. ? Not at all easy to guess.
Feb-28-11  selfmate: <Once: ... The real answer to hanging pawns seems to be to use them to grab space and then to find an opportunity to throw them forwards, even if it means sacrificing them for the greater good.

And that is what Janowski does here. He takes risks with his centre pawns and allows them to be liquidated. But in return his pieces flood into the black kingside for a lethal mating attack.>

I believe you're right.

The Oxford Companion to Chess (1st edition) gives these two games as examples of how the side with hanging pawns can parlay them, by a timely advance and liquidation, into a winning attack:

Seirawan vs Korchnoi, 1980
Stahlberg vs Szabo, 1952

Jun-26-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eisenheim: this can also be a nice puzzle, the complexity of which depends on how far you set it back.
Jun-07-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: < Phony Benoni: I wonder if we have a descriptive notation typo here. After <24.d6 , 24...Bxc4> is laughingly bad. So I wonder if the move was actually recorded as 24...BxP >

I think you are very correct Phony..
One of the advantages of algebraic notation is that it avoids any possible ambiguity like that, although later descriptive can be very specific (i.e., B/7xP or B/6xP) but whichever play recorded the game, he probably thought it was obvious which bishop was capturing, and simply jotted down BxP. Note that black played BxP on both moves 24 and 25, so it certainly appears the move order just got reversed...

I think the actual move order was 24. d6 Bxd6 25. Nxf6 Bxc4 26. Qh6 . The final position is the same after either move order, but it is just a lot more sensible following the order given.

after 24.d6


click for larger view

d6 was obviously played as a decoying move, to lure the bishop away from the guard of f6. After Bxd6 Nxf6 the knight is immune because of Bxf6 mate.


click for larger view

The mating net is closing, and black tried the desperanzo Bxc4 in an attempt to eliminate one of the attackers (Be6). But of course, Qh6 puts blacks lights out.

Exchanging pieces is a normal way for the defender to minimize or neutralize an attack, but the beauty of this game is that black is OUT OF TIME. He is several tempi behind and is left defenseless.

A very nice short game indeed, by Janowski.

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