chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
Jose Raul Capablanca vs Oscar Chajes
Rice Memorial (1916), New York, NY USA, rd 4, Jan-21
Spanish Game: Open Variations. Classical Defense (C83)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Get this game explained with Decode Chess
explore this opening
find similar games 11 more Capablanca/O Chajes games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: Some games have annotation. These are denoted in the game list with the icon.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
Aug-28-09  birthtimes: Instructive rook and pawns endgame as Chajes appears to not know how to make it difficult for Capa...
Apr-25-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jonathan Sarfati: This was a theoretical dispute. In the St Petersburg 1914 tourney, Tarrasch had been very successful with his .. d4 (beating Bernstein O Bernstein vs Tarrasch, 1914 and nearly beating Lasker Lasker vs Tarrasch, 1914). Capa published an article claiming a White advantage after Ne4. But both Chajes and Hodges disputed that claim, thinking that White's isolated Q-side Ps were not compensated by White's activity. Capa proved them both wrong (compare Capablanca vs O Chajes, 1915 which has his notes, while this game is a rematch with the same result, and Capablanca vs A Hodges, 1916).
Sep-19-20  RandomVisitor: Stockfish says...

Capa is right if black replies 12...dxc3, and Chajes/Hodges are right if black plays the better move, 12...d3.

Note that in Capa's 12...dxc3 line the machine prefers 15.Bg5 to Capa's 15.bxc3


click for larger view

Stockfish_20091507_x64_modern:

54/83 1:27:44 +0.10 12...d3 13.Nxc5 dxc2 14.Qxd8+ Rxd8 15.Nxe6 fxe6 16.Be3 Rd5 17.Rac1 Nxe5 18.Nxe5 Rxe5 19.Rxc2 Kf7 20.c4 b4 21.Rd1 Rd8

<54/87 1:27:44 +0.77 12...dxc3 13.Nxc5 Bxc5 14.Be4 Qd7 15.Bg5> h6 16.Qc2 hxg5 17.Rad1 Nb4 18.Qxc3 Bxf2+ 19.Kxf2 Nd5 20.Qc5 c6 21.Nxg5 Rh5

Sep-19-20  RandomVisitor: With regard to Capa's 15.bxc3 line, it was an interesting idea:


click for larger view

Stockfish_20091507_x64_modern:

50/71 54:57 +0.47 15.Bg5 h6 16.Qc2 hxg5 17.Rad1 Nb4 18.Qxc3 Bxf2+ 19.Kxf2 Nd5 20.Qc5 c6 21.Nxg5 Rh5 22.Nf3 Qa7 23.Rc1 Ne7 24.a3 Qxc5+

<49/64 54:57 +0.39 15.bxc3 Rd8 16.Qc2> Bd5 17.Bg5 Bxe4 18.Qxe4 Ne7 19.Bxe7 Bxe7 20.Qb7 0-0 21.Qxa6 Ra8 22.Qb7 Rfb8 23.Qe4 Ra4 24.Qe2 h6

Rather than 15.bxc3 Rd8 <16.Qc2> Capa preferred 16.Qxd7+ Bxd7 17.Rd1 and said "Black could not castle because of 18. Be3! Bxe3 19. Rxd7! Rxd7 20. Bxc6 and White will come out with two minor pieces for a Rook and two pawns." yet Stockfish claims 20...Rd3 21.fxe3 Rxc3 is more or less even.

In sum, both sides did not see the whole picture. I'm not sure I do either.

Sep-20-20  SChesshevsky: <Capa is right if black replies 12...dxc3, and Chajes/Hodges are right if black plays the better move 12...d3>

Appears restricting whites LSB is a key idea for black. Letting it out with ...dxc3, especially to the a8-h1 diagonal, looks to force black into awkward moves to try to equalize. Maybe made harder because pieces aren't placed that well and seems at least a tempo down.

With possible ...d3 line continuations, seems Black is willing to accept bad pawn formation for activity and taking off the LSB. Or a possibly weak advanced d pawn for the time it takes white to deal with it.

Not sure who or when came up with ...d3 as best after...d4 but looks pretty standard for awhile. Games by Koneru and Ding come to mind for...d3.

Sep-21-20  RandomVisitor: So, what is best play after 8...Be6?

Stockfish has an opinion:

Note that Capa started this mess by criticizing 11...d4, when in fact 100 years+ later it might even be best play.


click for larger view

Stockfish_20091507_x64_modern:
NNUE evaluation using nn-03744f8d56d8.nnue enabled

<62/77 22:42:37 +0.19 9.c3 Be7 10.Nbd2 Nc5 11.Bc2 d4 12.Nxd4> Nxd4 13.cxd4 Qxd4 14.Nf3 Qxd1 15.Rxd1 Rd8 16.Be3 Rxd1+ 17.Rxd1 Na4 18.Bxa4 bxa4

Sep-21-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<RandomVisitor> So, what is best play after 8...Be6?>

Well, that depends. If you are interested in statistics of game results I looked at the ChessTempo database which has a little bit under 1.9M games, of which 6,860 have the position after 8...Be6.


click for larger view

The top 4 moves when more than 150 games played in terms of White scoring percentage along with the number of games for each move were:

9.Be3 910 59.7%
9.Qe2 921 59.5%
9.Nbd2 2,332 59.2%
9.c3 2,560 54.5%

These represent 98.0% of the 6,860 games played from this position. There doesn't seem to be much to choose between the top 3 moves.

But a lot depends on how strong the players are. The ChessTempo database provides a convenient way to filter out games according to the players' ratings. There were 1,596 games when both players are rated 2200+ and the top 4 moves when more than 600 games were played and the number of games with each move were:

9.Qe2 620 59.8%
9.Be3 672 58.3%
9.Nbd2 1,657 57.5%
9.c3 1,511 54.9%

These also represent 98.0% of the 4,549 games played. Not too different from when all games were considered.

Finally, there were 105 games played when both players were rated 2700+, and the top 4 moves (only 4 different moves were played at the top level from this position), number of games for each, and White's scoring percentage were:

9.c3 19 65.8%
9.Nbd2 59 61.9%
9.Be3 16 59.4%
9.Qe2 11 59.1%

These represent 100% of the games played. What's interesting is how much greater White's scoring percentage is (perhaps indicating that White's position is inherently much better than Black's <if> you know how to exploit Black's weaknesses and that the two most popular moves are the two which were ranked #3 and #4 when the games involved weaker players.

So, pick your strength and your opponent's and statistically speaking you'll know what the best move to play is. But that's just statistically speaking, of course.

Sep-21-20  RandomVisitor: <AylerKupp>Good to see your insight. I always thought that an interesting metric might be the statistics of a position <in the last year or two>. Many of these lines were played years ago when analysis was not as thorough, and can likely be discarded.

Updating my earlier run. Note that the machine does not think that the latent potential of the position in the uncertain future is all that high, in other words, that white likely cannot force a positional advantage of sorts regardless of what black plays.


click for larger view

Stockfish_20091507_x64_modern:
NNUE evaluation using nn-03744f8d56d8.nnue enabled

<64/89 47:56:55 +0.12 9.Nbd2 Nc5 10.c3 Be7 11.Bc2 d4 12.Nb3 d3> 13.Nxc5 dxc2 14.Qxd8+ Rxd8 15.Nxe6 fxe6 16.Be3 Rd5 17.Rfc1 Nxe5 18.Nxe5 Rxe5 19.Rxc2 Kf7 20.c4 b4 21.Rd1 Rd8 22.Rxd8 Bxd8 23.Kf1

Sep-22-20  SChesshevsky: Maybe not best but seemingly most direct and quickly sharp is whites Qe2. A favorite of Keres and related to the Qe2 Worrall line in the RL Closed.

Probably more effective in the Open as swinging the rook to d1 and using the pin is tricky for black. Seen in a Fischer v. Ree crush.

Sep-22-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <SChesshevsky....Probably more effective in the Open as swinging the rook to d1 and using the pin is tricky for black. Seen in a Fischer v. Ree crush.>

Used to play the Open for Black and that line indeed has some dangerous features, but Ree fell for a sucker punch in the game cited above. His 12....Qd7 used to be the most common rejoinder, but 12....Bc5 13.Be3 Bxe3 14.Qxe3 Qb8 was later played more often--by even Karpov on one occasion.

Sep-22-20  RandomVisitor: I am looking at this position on another computer set up to tell me the top 4 moves:

9.c3 and 9.Nbd2 likely transpose to some degree and reach the theoretical position discussed by Capa with 11...d4 where 12.Nb3 and 12.Ne4 also transpose, 9.Be3 is strong, 9.Qe2 is next.


click for larger view

Stockfish_20092110_x64_modern:

57/75 12:42:03 +0.20 9.Be3 Be7 10.c3 Qd7 11.h3 Na5 12.Nbd2 Nxd2 13.Qxd2 c5 14.Bc2 Nc4 15.Qc1 Bf5 16.Bg5 Bxg5 17.Nxg5 h6 18.e6 Bxe6 1

57/77 12:42:03 +0.12 9.c3 Be7 10.Nbd2 Nc5 11.Bc2 d4 12.Nb3 d3 13.Nxc5 dxc2 14.Qxd8+ Rxd8 15.Nxe6 fxe6 16.Be3 Rd5 17.Rfc1 Nxe5 18.Nxe5 Rxe5

57/70 12:42:03 +0.12 9.Nbd2 Nc5 10.c3 Be7 11.Bc2 d4 12.Nb3 d3 13.Nxc5 dxc2 14.Qxd8+ Rxd8 15.Nxe6 fxe6 16.Be3 Rd5 17.Rfc1 Nxe5 18.Nxe5 Rxe5

57/79 12:42:03 -0.00 9.Qe2 Be7 10.c3 0-0 11.Be3 Qd7 12.Rd1 Nc5 13.Bc2 Bg4 14.h3 Bxf3 15.Qxf3 Rad8 16.Qe2 Qe6 17.f4 f6 18.Qh5 g6

Sep-22-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Stockfish>'s suggestion of 9.Be3 Be7 10.c3 is a wily bit of business and what Ljubojevic would have long called 'trickful', inasmuch as it avoids the Dilworth (after the main line 9.c3) ....Bc5.
Sep-22-20  SChesshevsky: < perfidious: ... but 12....Bc5 13.Be3 Bxe3 14.Qxe3 Qb8 was later played more often...>

Can see why. After 14...Qb8, it feels like the whole Qe2, Rd1 idea with tricks up the d-file is just bad. Maybe not terrible but certainly not good. Seems it's now white that's behind in time and initiative and with his pieces not that well placed. Compared to other ideas for white where black might likely have to face those issues.

Given 12...Bc5, I'd think unless there's other ideas besides c4 for white, might want to put Qe2 behind other considerations after 8...Be6.

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific game only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
05b_extra passed b-pawn in R+4:3||
by whiteshark
98_C80-C83_Ruy Lopez, Open
by whiteshark
nice endgame
from capa by obrit
February, p. 37 [Game 40 / 3119]
from American Chess Bulletin 1916 by Phony Benoni
Prelim, Round 4 (Friday, January 21)
from New York 1916 (Rice Memorial) by Phony Benoni
98_C80-C83_Ruy Lopez, Open
by webbing1947

Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2020, Chessgames Services LLC