chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Jackson Whipps Showalter vs Jean Taubenhaus
6th American Chess Congress (1889), New York, NY USA, rd 25, Apr-24
King's Gambit: Accepted. Double Muzio Gambit (C37)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Annotations by Wilhelm Steinitz.      [129 more games annotated by Steinitz]

explore this opening
find similar games 2 more Showalter/Taubenhaus games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can get computer analysis by clicking the "ENGINE" button below the game.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
Mar-08-03  Rookpawn: Instead of the Bishop sacrifice, White could have played the normal 8. d3. This would leave Black only one active piece: his Queen. Compare this to White's Rook, King's Bishop, and Queen (not to mention his c1 Bishop, which is ready to join the battle). This lively piece activity and the attack down the f-file costs White his King's Knight, of course.
Feb-16-05  cuendillar: Steinitz' comment about this being sounder if white gives knight odds seems a bit strange. If that indeed is correct, the double muzio really is a super-sharp opening. By the way, this is the best try to refute it, isn't it?
Jul-29-05  aw1988: Yes, apparently 9...Qf5 is the refutation to the double sacrifice in the Muzio.
Mar-01-06  DeepBlade: It is a part of the mainline

Qxd4 is considered a blunder, but Black can try to hold on till the endgame.

Fritz' book gives
1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Qf6 7. e5 Qxe5 Now White can choose to play 8.d3 or go into the deep dark sea of 8.Bxf7!

Fritz' Book says this is the mainline for the Accepted Double Muzio w/ Qf5

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Qf6 7. e5 Qxe5 8. Bxf7+ Kxf7 9. d4 Qf5 10. g4 Qg6 11. Bxf4 Nf6 12. Be5 Be7 13. Nc3 d6 14. Bxf6 Bxg4 15. Qd5+ Be6+ 16. Qg5 Bxf6 17. Rxf6+ Qxf6 18. Rf1 Nd7 Fritz evaluates the position as +3.oo for Black.

I consider this opening a rollercoaster, the main line keeps Black more than alive, but one little mistake and it is all over.

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Qf6 7. e5 Qxe5 8. Bxf7+ Kxf7 9. d4 Qxd4+ 10. Be3 Qf6 11. Bxf4 Bc5+ 12. Kh1 Bd4 13. c3 d6 14. cxd4 Ke8 15. Nc3 Kd7 16. Nd5 Qe6 17. Rae1 Qf5 18. Qe3 Qg6 19. Qh3+ Kd8 20. Bg5+ Nf6 21. Qe3 Qe8 22. Bxf6+ Kd7 23. Qh3+ Kc6 24. Rc1+ Kb5 25. Qb3+ Ka6 26. Qa3+ Kb5 27. Qb4+ Ka6 28. Nxc7#

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Qf6 7. e5 Qxe5 8. Bxf7+ Kxf7 9. d4 Qxd4+ 10. Be3 Qf6 11. Bxf4 Bc5+ 12. Kh1 Bd4 13. c3 d6 14. cxd4 Ke8 15. Qh5+ Kd7 16. Nc3 Qe6 17. Rae1 Qg6 18. Qh3+ Kd8 19. Bg5+ Nf6 20. Qh4 Rg8 21. Bxf6+ Kd7 22. Re7+ Kd8 23. Rg7+ Ke8 24. Qe1+ Qe4 25. Qxe4+ Be6 26. Rxg8+ Kd7 27. Rd8#

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Qf6 7. e5 Qxe5 8. Bxf7+ Kxf7 9. d4 Qxd4+ 10. Be3 Qxb2 11. Qxf4+ Nf6 12. Bd4 Qxd4+ 13. Qxd4 Be7 14. Nc3 Kg7 15. Rae1 Bd8 16. Rxf6 Bxf6 17. Re7+ Kg6 18. Qg4+ Kh6 19. Rf7 Bxc3 20. Rf3 Bd4+ 21. Kh1 Nc6 22. Rh3#

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Qf6 7. e5 Qxe5 8. Bxf7+ Kxf7 9. d4 Qxd4+ 10. Be3 Qa4 11. Qh5+ Ke7 12. Qe5+ Kd8 13. Rxf4 Bd6 14. Qg7 Bxf4 15. Qf8#

Mar-01-06  DeepBlade: 1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Qf6 7. e5 Qxe5 8. Bxf7+ Kxf7 9. d4 Qxd4+ 10. Be3 Qf6 11. Bxf4 Bc5+ 12. Kh1 Ne7 13. Nc3 Na6 14. Ne4 Qf5 15. g4 Qg6 16. Bh6+ Nf5 17. Qxf5+ Qxf5 18. Rxf5+ Ke8 19. Re5+ Be7 20. Bg5 h6 21. Rxe7+ Kd8 22. Bh4 c6 23. Rh7+ Kc7 24. Rxh8 d6 25. Bd8+ Kb8 26. Nxd6 b6 27. Re1 Nc7 28. Re7 a5 29. Rxc7 Ba6 30. Rb7+ Bxb7 31. Bxb6+ Bc8 32. Rxc8#

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O Qe7 6. d4 gxf3 7. Qxf3 Bg7 8. e5 Qb4 9. Bxf7+ Kxf7 10. Qxf4+ Ke8 11. c3 Qf8 12. Qg4 Qe7 13. Qh5+ Kd8 14. Bg5 Nf6 15. Qh4 Bh6 16. Bxf6 Be3 17. Kh1 Nc6 18. Bxe7+ Nxe7 19. Qf6 Rg8 20. Qf8+ Rxf8 21. Rxf8#

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Qf6 7. e5 Qxe5 8. Bxf7+ Kxf7 9. d4 Qxd4+ 10. Be3 Qxb2 11. Qxf4+ Ke6 12. Qf7+ Ke5 13. Rf5+ Kd6 14. Qd5+ Ke7 15. Qe4+ Qe5 16. Qxe5+ Kd8 17. Rxf8#

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Qf6 7. e5 Qxe5 8. Bxf7+ Kxf7 9. d4 Qxd4+ 10. Be3 Qf6 11. Bxf4 Ke8 12. Nc3 Bc5+ 13. Kh1 Bd6 14. Nd5 Qg7 15. Bxd6 cxd6 16. Rae1+ Ne7 17. Rxe7+ Qxe7 18. Nxe7 Na6 19. Qf7+ Kd8 20. Nd5 Re8 21. Qf6+ Re7 22. Qxe7#

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Qf6 7. e5 Qxe5 8. Bxf7+ Kxf7 9. d4 Qxd4+ 10. Be3 Qf6 11. Bxf4 Bc5+ 12. Kh1 Bd4 13. c3 d6 14. cxd4 Ke8 15. Nc3 Ne7 16. Rae1 Kd8 17. Nd5 Nxd5 18. Qxd5 Bf5 19. Qxb7 Bd3 20. Be5 Qxf1+ 21. Rxf1 dxe5 22. Rf7 Ke8 23. Qxc7 exd4 24. Qe7#

Feb-19-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: <cuendillar's> comments might have a basis in truth. In many critical variations, White plays Nc3 for no other reason than to develop the QR. The Knight itself is usually superfluous. Therefore, without the Nb1 in an odds game, White saves a critical tempo by developing the Rook immediately.

Which leads to another probably apocryphal story involving Emmanuel Lasker. He and a friend stopped at a tavern for lunch and discovered a local champion who gave Knight odds to all comers for small stakes and won every game. No one in the tavern recognized the man who held the World Championship for almost 3 decades.

Lasker and his friend watched a few games. In every game, the local champ played a Muzio Gambit. Lasker whispered to his friend, "This local champion will buy us lunch."

Lasker challenged the champ for a small stake, took the Black pieces--and lost. He got crushed. The locals laughed at him. Then he challenged the champ again, for much higher stakes, but this time, Lasker would have the White pieces and give Knight odds!

The local champ agreed and everyone thought that Lasker would get crushed again--after all, he lost with an extra Knight, right? But Lasker blew the local champ off the board in less than 20 moves and pocketed a handsome cash prize. He then told the locals that giving Knight odds makes the Muzio Gambit a forced win for White.

As he and his friend sat down to their meal, his friend asked, "Was that true, what you said about the Muzio?" Lasker shrugged and replied, "Why do you care? We're eating for free!"

Another one of those stories you wish were true, but probably aren't.

Sep-11-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  louispaulsen88888888: Iím changing my middle name to Whipps!
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any member Iincludinfgall Admin and Owners or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. If you think someone is an idiot, then provide evidence that their reasoning is invalid and/or idiotic, instead of just calling them an idiot. It's a subtle but important distinction, even in political discussions.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
KGA Double Muzio Gambit
from Perfect King's Gambit games by Sebastian88
Super Muzio Games
by Calli
double-backed in the Double Muzio! annotations by Steinitz
from chess strategems v - under construction by gauer
venderbest's black
by venderbest
Notes by Steinitz
from Annotations e4 Various Authorities & Fredthebear by fredthebear
New York 1889
by suenteus po 147
x( C37 ) KGA Quade, Salvio, Muzio Gambit, etc.
by fredthebear


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC