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Alonso Zapata vs Viswanathan Anand
Biel (1988)  ·  Russian Game: Nimzowitsch Attack (C42)  ·  1-0
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find similar games 3 more A Zapata/Anand games
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-10-10  rapidcitychess: Oops...
Jun-06-11  chesssantosh: <kevins55555>.ya i agree.Anand should have continued to play so that it would later become "lose minor piece" variation in petroff defence.i m sure kramnik will give a try on this variation !!!!
Jun-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: Can someone tell me what tournament this was? When I google chess biel 1988 I get this one:

http://www.365chess.com/tournaments...

No Zapata or Anand, so wrong tournament.

Jun-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sastre: It was the Biel-B 1988 tournament - http://www.365chess.com/tournaments....
Jun-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: <sastre> ha! it was right around the corner (from where I first looked). Thanks!
Jun-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Someone asked earlier about the shortest master game. The shortest decisive master game not lost because of a protest or forfeit is Z Djordjevic vs M Kovacevic, 1984 (3 moves).
Sep-02-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  scormus: Anand was always, IMO, a gentleman. A rogue would have tried 6 ... Qe7 and hoped for 7 Qb5+, attacking the Bf5.
Sep-02-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  scormus: And as a gentleman he would have taken his lumps, even when he lost because he made a "typo"
Sep-05-11  MaczynskiPratten: See Anand's amusing explanation of why he resigned, at the start of page 3 (as well as the background to the debacle as explained on page 1)
Sep-05-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <MaczynskiPratten> That's priceless.
Sep-08-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  scormus: <MaczynskiPratten: See Anand's amusing explanation of why he resigned>

Thanks! Ah yes, Oh dear,. A very understandable choice he made to resign and get out fast. I dont blame him at all, I would have done the same.

But the explanation? I would never have admitted I blindly followed Informator (OK I never saw Informator, more like an outdated MCO).

I would have cited what actually DID happen to me once .... as I made my 4th or 5th move my mind was wandering (as it does) to a different variation where some other move is played. Then I looked at the board in horror and saw I actually played that other move :O

In my game the unintended move wasnt immediately losing so I played on and tried to bluff it out, pretending it was a prepared new move. Got away with it too ;)

Nov-28-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Reisswolf: <hedgeh0g: Ah...<<the blunder variation of the Petrov>>.>

Maybe it's because I haven't had enough sleep in the last several days, but I can't stop laughing at that description.

May-08-12  solskytz: I can see Capablanca playing on for 46 moves, later getting a couple of pawns as some compensation for the piece, and then...

but of course, not a pleasant situation to find oneself in

Jun-20-12  KKsystem: The world chess champion is renowned for his lightning speed in chess not only in his wins but also in his losses it seems LOL!
Sep-02-12  Dionysius1: Could someone just clarify this game for me? I don't get how B has to lose a piece. If 6...Qe7 then 7 d3 Nc5 8 Qb5+ Bd7. Or 7 Nd5 Qe1 and there's only the Q attacking the N on e4 which is defended by the bishop.
Dec-11-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <Dionysius1>: If <6. ... Qe7>, White plays <7. Nd5> < >.

Anand supposedly went into the ultra-dubious (viz., totally losing) <5. ... Bf5> line based on having seen Miles vs Christiansen, 1987 in Informantor and (sans analysis) having concluded it was a good way to equalize. In doing so, there were two keys points the future World Champion failed to take into account: (1) never play a line without analyzing it (now possible even for someone as lazy as myself thanks to engines); and (2) the Miles-Christiansen game was a pre-arranged draw.

In the 1987 game, Miles saw the refutation with <6. Qe2> (and polished the e2 square with his finger for a length of time to make sure Christiansen would realize what he had walked into), but he ultimately honored the agreement to a GM draw by playing the innocuous <6. Nxe4>.

Sep-19-13  zavariz: Hard to believe.
Jun-01-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eduardo Bermudez: Believe or not !
Jul-17-14  GM Rounak Pathak: Irrational!
Jul-17-14  jhelix70: This game is a great example of the difference between "knowing theory" and "understanding an opening"
Sep-25-14  SpiritedReposte: Shortest loss of any world champion ever??? I know Karpov had a famous slip against Christianson but that was 11 moves or so.

This record may never be broken...hard to imagine a future/former world champ losing in 6 moves.

Sep-25-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: A quick scan through any reasonable database will reveal that this position


click for larger view

Has popped up 14 times in OTB play (possibly more if you have a more up to date DB than mine.).

The first pre-dated the Miles pre-arranged game by 6 years when it appeared in the 1982 Olmpiad.

In a 2005 game I found this.

http://chess-db.com/public/game.jsp...

White played one more move 6...Qe7 then resigned after 7.Nd5.

Sep-25-14  john barleycorn: <Sally Simpson: A quick scan through any reasonable database will reveal that this position

...

Has popped up 14 times in OTB play (possibly more if you have a more up to date DB than mine.).>

Then it is a strong competitor to this game:

Keres vs E Arlamowski, 1950


click for larger view

Oct-15-14  doctork: @aw1988 if you see "no real chances for heavy tactics" in the 5.Nc3 line then you need to look up Karjakin's crushing win over Kramnik.
Oct-16-14  Superjombonbo: Anand played 5...Bf5 because he had a game go 5. c4 Be7 6. Nc3 Bf5.
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