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Viswanathan Anand vs Garry Kasparov
Kasparov - Anand PCA World Championship Match (1995), New York, NY USA, rd 3, Sep-14
Sicilian Defense: Scheveningen. Classical Variation (B84)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jan-09-03  Ashley: Many believe that Anand lost the match by repeating his game six opening in game ten and allowing the world champion to even the score by crushing him with home preparation. Others claim it was this earlier game. After the excellent 19. e5 Anand missed the winning 20. exf6 Bxf6 21. Bxh7+ forcing 21Kxh7 22. Ng5+ winning as in 22 Bxg5 23. fxg5 Kg6 24. Rf6+ gxf6 25. gxf6+ Kh5 26. Qh3+ Kg5 27. Rf1 Qd7 28.Rf4. Anand would have had to find a lot of super moves over the board, not just 20 and 21, but 24 and 28.
Jan-09-03  Sabatini: What if 27e5 was played?
Jan-09-03  Ashley: If 27e5 28. Be3+ Kg6 29. Qh6+ Kf7 30. Qg7+ Ke6 31. Qe7#
Jan-09-03  Ashley: It is not exactly forced, however it has to be played to avoid g6+.
Jan-09-03  knight errant: Is 23Kg6 actually forced? Can 22...Kg6 be played instead of 22...Bxg5? Sorry for reposting, now half of your answer will be above my question.
Jan-10-03  PVS: This game reminds me of the famous Fischer vs Geller, 1967 game. In that game the key move missed by Fischer [20. Qf4] was analysed subsequently as a win against all possible defences, but the winning lines were considered possibly too difficult to have been found over the board. Has 22Kg8 been examined for instance? In reply to knight errant, I think 22Kg6 is demolished by 23. f5+ exf5 24. Nge4+ Kh7 25. Bxf6.
Jan-10-03  Samuel Maverick: chessgames.com--This game is from the 1995 world championship match in New York City.
Jan-15-03  Ashley: Chessgames.com. Mr. Maverick is correct, this game is from the 1995 world championship match. It is game three.
Sep-08-03  Omar1: A pretty boring game really.Just a mass of exchanges in the centre.Bishops of opposite color almost always equates to a draw!
Sep-09-03  seoulmama: Omar, purchase Muller and Lamprecht's FCE, and you will see that not all opposite colored bishop endings are drawn.
Sep-09-03  seoulmama: Hmm... call me crazy, but I really can't see a way for Black to claim 27... e5 legal...
Sep-09-03  seoulmama: Oh, sorry. I thought u were talkin' about this game.
Apr-11-05  dragon40: This was a very exciting game!
Anand's 19. e5! really had Kasparov reeling and he should have won, as demonstrated by <Ashley> and that excellent analysis he gave! After the game, Anand said he saw the Bishop sacrifice, but underestimated its strength. Also, Kasparov's reply <19...Rf8> came so fast that Anand may have believed Kasparov too had seen it, and it was not going to "work for him". (Anand spent 30 minutes on that 19th move, while Kasparov only took 2 minutes to play his reply)
Nov-29-05  morphyvsfischer: 15...Qd7 16 Nd4 seems to favor White.

19...dxe5 20 Bxh7+ Kxh7 21 fxe5 f5 22 Bxc5 Bxc5 23 Ng5+ with a dangerous attack.

20 exf6 Bxf6 21 Bxh7+ Kxh7 22 Ng5+ and now:

22...Bxg5 fxg5 and:

23...Nxc2?? 24 g6+ Kg8 25 Qh3 mates.
23...Bxg2 24 Kxg2 Qc6+ 25 Kg1 Kg6 26 Rf6+! gxf6 27 gxf6+ Kh5 28 Qh3+ Kg5 29 Be3+ Kxf6 30 Rf1+ Kg7 31 Bh6+ Kg6 32 Bxf8 wins. 23...Rh8 24 g6+ Kg8 25 Rf7 e5 26 Bxc5 with a bind.
23...Rxf1+ 24 Rxf1 Kg6 25 Qxd6 Qd7 26 Qxc5 Nxc2 27 Ne2! Nxd4 28 Nxd4 Bd5 29 Qc2+ Kxg5 30 Qh7 wins.

Nov-29-05  morphyvsfischer: Instead of 22...Bxg5, 22...Kg8 23 Qh4 Bxg5 24 fxg5 Qe8 25 Rxf8+ Kxf8 26 Rf1+ Kg8 (...Ke7 27 g6+ Kd7 28 Rf7+ Kc8 29 Bxg7 threatens Qxb4 and Rf8) 27 Bxg7! Kxg7 28 Qh6+ Kg8 and now:

29 g6 Qd7 30 Rf7 Qxf7 31 gxf7+ Kxf7 32 Qh7+ Kf6 33 Qh4+ Kf7 34 Qxb4 Rg8 35 Kg1 Rxg2+ 36 Kf1 and White should win.

29 Rf6! Rc8 30 Rg6+ Qxg6 31 Qxg6+ Kf8 32 Qh7 wins.

17 ...Nc5? was the mistake.

Nov-29-05  morphyvsfischer: 20...Nxd3!? is more challenging: 21 Bxd6 Bxd6 22 exd6 Nxb2 and 21 exd6 Nxc5 22 dxe7 Rf7 are small advantages for White.

33 Qxf7+ Kxf7 34 Bg4 Bc5 35 Bc8 b6 36 axb6 Bxb6 37 Bxa6 Ke6 is a draw.

May-21-12  Hesam7: <Ashley: Anand would have had to find a lot of super moves over the board, not just 20 and 21, but 24 and 28.>

And he might not have been winning in the end. After 20. exf6 Bxf6 21. Bxh7+ Kxh7 22. Ng5+ Bxg5 23. fxg5 Rxf1+ 24. Rxf1 Kg6 25. Qxd6 Qd7 26. Qxc5, one can improve over <morphyvsfischer>'s 26. ... Nxc2? with 26. ... e5!


click for larger view

White is two pawns up, Black sacrifices another to attack the White King:

(A) 27. Bxe5 Qd2! 28. Qg1 (trading Queens does not help: 28. Qd6+ Qxd6 29. Bxd6 Nxc2 30. Kg1 Ne3! 31. Rf2 Rd8) 28. ... Re8 29. Rf2 Qxg5 30. Bd6 (30. Bc7 Kh7 and Black continues with Re5-Qg6-Rg5) 30. ... Qxa5 31. Qd1 Kh7

(B) 27. Qxe5 Re8! 28. Qf4 (only move; after 28. Qc5 Qg4 29. Rg1 Re1! 30. Qd6+ Re6 Black is winning!) 28. ... Nxc2


click for larger view

Black is threatening ... Ne1:

(B1) 29. Bf2!? Qf5 30. Qxf5+ Kxf5 31. h4 Kg4

(B2) 29. Bxg7!? Kxg7 30. Qf6+ Kg8 31. Qg6+ Qg7 32. Qxc2 Qxg5

(B3) 29. Ba7 Ne1 30. Rg1 Qd3 31. Qf2 Nxg2 32. Rxg2 Re5 33. Kg1 Bxg2 34. Kxg2 Rf5 35. Qe2 Rxg5+ 36. Kf2 Qxe2+ 37. Nxe2 Rxa5 =

(B4) 29. Bb6 Ne1 30. Rg1 Nxg2 31. Rxg2 Re1+ 32. Bg1 Qd3 33. Qf2 Re5 34. Qf4 Qh3 35. Qg3 Qxg2+ 36. Qxg2 Bxg2+ 37. Kxg2 Rxg5+ 38. Kf2 Rxa5 =

(B5) 29. Bc5?! Ne1 30. Kg1 Nxg2 31. Qg3 Qd2 32. Rd1 Qf4 =

Even with best play Black has a great deal of compensation for his material deficit.

Jul-14-13  BlackFront: Interesting to periodically review a game like this with fresh silicon.

<And he might not have been winning in the end. After 20. exf6 Bxf6 21. Bxh7+ Kxh7 22. Ng5+ Bxg5 23. fxg5 Rxf1+ 24. Rxf1 Kg6 25. Qxd6 Qd7 26. Qxc5, one can improve over <morphyvsfischer>'s 26. ... Nxc2? with 26. ... e5!>

Houdini 1.5's main line runs:

<20. exf6 Bxf6 21. Bxh7+ Kxh7 22. Ng5+ Bxg5 23. fxg5 Rxf1+ 24. Rxf1 Kg6 25. Bxc5 dxc5 26. Ne2 e5 27. Qxe5 Qg4 28. Nf4 Kh7 29. h3 Bxg2+ 30. Nxg2 Nc6 31. Qe3 Qc4 32. g6+ Kf8 33. Rf4 Qd5 34. Re4 Rf8 35. Re8 Qd1+ 36. Kh2 Qd6+ 37. Nf4 Nd4 38. c3 Nf5 39. Qe6+ Qxe6 40. Rxf8 Kxf8 41. Nxe6+ Ke7 42. Nxc5> and White must be winning the endgame.

In light of this, Black's best practical hope might be to give up the exchange with 20...Rxf6 when White has a persistent advantage but no forced win.

Nov-06-13  RookFile: A very interesting game of chess.
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