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Lawrence Day vs Jonathan Berry
"Blue Berry Waffles" (game of the day Jun-24-2006)
CAN-ch / Zonal (1975), Calgary CAN, rd 1, Aug-??
King's Gambit: Accepted. Fischer Defense (C34)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-11-04  samvega: Mr. Day:
Did you by any chance give an outdoor simul when you were in Calgary? I have a vague childhood memory of seeing simul on 8th avenue (a downtown pedestrian street) and asking my parents what was going on . . . The date is about right.
Oct-11-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  IMlday: <ray>thanks. It was fun. <samvega> It wasn't me gave the outdoor simul in 1975, maybe GM Shamkovich who had just won the Canadian Open. I did give a simul in Calgary at a bar circa the mid-90's.
Oct-11-04  uzeromay: Perhaps 9...f3. 9...Nc6 looks a bit passive. Or, in the game, 10...f3.
Oct-13-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  IMlday: <uzeromay> Black's 7..Ne7 is inaccurate because the B/h6 is undefended and 9.Qd2 pins the f-pawn. Better is 7..c6 so as to be sure to be able to meet g2-g3 with f4-f3 *keeping the f-file closed*~~the strategic key. There is a thread on this line in the King's Gambit Accepted file or maybe it was kibitzing on Day-Morozevich, 1978 where Black improved on this game.
Oct-13-04  who: In the "A Bust of the King's Gambit" Fischer suggests 6...Bh6 (though he doesn't explain further)
Oct-13-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: Our 6. Ng1 discussion = King's Gambit Accepted (C34)
Mar-15-06  DeepBlade: Great game!

White's setup is a bit uncommon to me, I must have 5.Bc4 in my KGA games.

Trouble begins with 17. ...Qxa1
This game is like The Immortal Game, but with a little less flashy finish.

The g3 gambit in the KGA really gives good results, see J D Schwartz vs R Birkett, 2005 (althou the theme of the game is different)

After 16.Rxg3, Black finds her lone Queen in White's fragile stronghold. Black is satisfied with the skewer, but White has 4 nicely placed pieces while Black tries to defend with 2 Knights.

Now 20.Qf6 threathens Qxe7#
Black Defends with 20. ...Re8
Now 21.Rg8 overloads the Rook

The KGA is a really nice opening, organize more thematic tournaments! I find KGA games ver usefull, because the player who capitalizes on weaknesses/blunders wins.

Mar-15-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  IMlday: The Vienna 1903 tournament was very entertaining. Otherwise we wouldn't know how solid players like Schlechter or Maroczy would play the White side. :-) For Chigorin, near the end of his career, it was one of his best results ever.
Jun-24-06  EmperorAtahualpa: A very interesting variation of the KGA!

I did a bit of research in my MCO-14 and here are the results:

First of all, 3...d6 is called the Becker defense in MCO-14, not the Fischer defense, but I guess it is known under both names.

At move 4, MCO-14 gives a side variation 4.Bc4 h6 5.d3 (h4 might be better) g5 6.g3 g4 7.Nd4 f3 8.c3 Nc6 as in J Gallagher vs A Kuzmin, 1995.

But the main line is 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 d6 4.d4 g5 5.h4 g4 6.Ng1.

After 6.Ng1, MCO-14 gives three suggestions:

<1> Main variation: 6...Bh6 7.Ne2 8.Nbc3 c6 9.g3 fxg3 10.Nxg3 Bxc1 11.Rxc1 Ne7 12.e5 dxe5 13.Nce4 Qh6 resulting in roughly even chances.

See this game:

[Site "Yugoslavia Tch"]
[Date "1995.??.??"]
[White "Petrovic,Vojislav"]
[Black "Vujosevic,Vladimir"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C34"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 d6 4. d4 g5 5. h4
g4 6. Ng1 Bh6 7. Ne2 Qf6 8. Nbc3 c6 9. g3
fxg3 10. Nxg3 Bxc1 11. Rxc1 Ne7 12. Bc4 Nd7 13. e5
dxe5 14. Nce4 Qh6 15. O-O f5 16. Rxf5 Nxf5 17. Nxf5
Qf4 18. dxe5 Kd8 19. Ned6 Rf8 20. e6 Rxf5 21. Nxf5
Qxf5 22. exd7 Bxd7 23. Qd4 Kc7 24. Rf1 Qa5 25. Qf4+
Kb6 26. c3 Qc5+ 27. Kh2 Re8 28. b4 Qe3 29. Qd6
Qh3+ 30. Kg1 Qe3+ 31. Kh2 Qh3+ 32. Kg1 Re3 33. Qd4+
Kc7 34. Qf4+ Kb6 35. Qd4+ Kc7 36. Qf4+ Kc8 37. Qf8+
Be8 38. Qf5+ Bd7 39. Qf8+ Re8 40. Qf4 Qxc3 0-1

<2> Side variation A: 6...Nf6 7.Bxf4 Nxe4 8.Bd3 f5 9.Ne2 as in Hebden vs Psakhis, 1986.

<3> Side variation B: 6...f3 7.Bg5 Be7 8.Qd2 h6 9.Bxe7 as in J Gallagher vs Ziatdinov, 1991.

Jun-24-06  EmperorAtahualpa: I forgot to give another variation mentioned in MCO-14:

1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 d5 4.d4 g5 5.h4 g4 6.Ng1 <f5 7.Nc3 Nf6 8.Bxf4 fxe4 9.Qd2 d5 10.Nb5 Na6>.

Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  IMlday: <EA> Instead of 9.Qd2 allowing ..d6-d5 White might consider playing 9.d4-d5 himself.
Jun-24-06  psmith: At first sight, one wonders whether there isn't a better defense than 18...Kd8, which abandons all hope of castling and walks into a nasty pin. However, it seems that other moves are equally disastrous. Here's some analysis with the help of (but not entirely by) Fritz 5.32 (or Old Fritz, as I like to call it).

18... Nxd5 19. exd5 Na5 20. b3! (prevents Nc4+) and Black has no defense against various threats of Qf6, Re3+ etc.

18...Be6 19. Nf6+ Kd8 20. Qg7 Ng6 21. h5 Nce7 22. hxg6 Nxg6 23. Nf4 winning (but not 18... Be6 19. Nxc7+ Kd7 20. Nxa8 Rxa8 21. d5 Nxd5 22. exd5 Bxd5

IMlday -- does this match anything like your analysis?

Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: CG I like the pun. My wife and I recently visited a farm in Florida and picked two gallons of Blue Berries. Last year I found some in the wild in a local forest. We enjoy them for both the good taste and our health. See http://www.blueberry.org/health.htm for some of the research on the benefits of this tasty treat.
Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Apparently IM Day has the original patent on 10. g3 in this tricky KGA line. With White seeminly getting the better of the tactics in the more aggressive 10...fxg3?! lines, perhaps Black would do better to go with development via 10...Bg7 = as in A Bangiev vs I Figler, 1986.
Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: "All in a Day's work". One of the pitfalls of playing the king's gambit is that often the king's castled position is not exactly safe. The bishop's pawn is gone and g3 is often open for attack. Or,in this case,the opportunity to castle is NOT there. Fancy footwork by the king is essential in these cases.
Jun-24-06  dakgootje: Didnt think at least at first that 10. g3 was any good, but it turned out pretty well.

and thanks psmith for that analysis as i indeed wondered if black didnt have a better defence

Jun-24-06  dakgootje: <kevin86>

E Jimenez Zerguera vs Keene, 1974

Jun-24-06  mack: I believe the correct pun today should have been 'Game of the Day' - poor form, <chessgames>.
Jun-24-06  dakgootje: carpe diem
Jun-24-06  blingice: Yeah, I agree. <CG.com>'s pun falls flat in comparison for the irony of <mack>'s.
Jun-24-06  apawnandafool: <mack> you might consider...

<IM Day's games for Game of the day.>

1)"It's a Beautiful Day"
P Murray vs L Day, 1975

2)"Hard Day's Knight"
L Day vs B Harper, 1975

3)"Christmas Day"
L Day vs Benko, 1980

also:

4)"What's the Yoos?"
L Day vs J Yoos, 1996

5)"Silence of the Lamb"
L Day vs B Lamb, 1990

6)"Rockin Gravel"
L Day vs S Gravel, 1996

and my personal favorite:

7)"Game of the Week"
Prins vs L Day, 1968

Jun-24-06  cyruslaihy: can't believe this kind of games still happens in the 19th century

the way the game end is really good though

Jun-25-06  psmith: <cyruslaihy> Not only that, these kinds of games still happened in the 20th century. I wonder about the 21st?
Jun-25-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  IMlday: <psm> I don't recall the exact analysis but my KGA was very well prepared in the mid-'70s and the conclusion, that Black was toast in this line (10..fxg3?), seems correct. <patzer2> Actually 10.g3's 'patent' goes to GM Albin Planinc from a game with Lajos Portisch. (Maybe Ljubljiana, maybe '73?) Somewhere I think I read Portisch's comments on this eventually drawn game which were very illuminating. He wanted the f-file closed with a White pawn at f4 after exchanging. blockading with ..f4-f3 is another method with a similar point. Allowing the open f-file is antipositional and risky imo; <daqootje> Indeed, Black missed 1..g6! :-)

Sep-13-08  Trigonometrist: 20... ♔d7
21.♕xe7+ ♔c6
22.♕xc7+ ♔b5
23.♘ec3+ ♔a6
24.♘b4#

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