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Robert Eugene Byrne vs Robert James Fischer
Sousse Interzonal (1967), Sousse TUN, rd 12, Oct-31
Sicilian Defense: Fischer-Sozin Attack. Flank Variation (B87)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-10-09  blacksburg: hehehe funny kibitzing
Sep-16-09  dTal: <chessblaster9: I have heard this game put this line out of business for white and it had much to do with 13...h5. Does anyone know what the point of 13...h5 is?>

you are right, 13.. h5 is the master stroke that won this game for Black. The point of White's strategy is to exchange both of Black's knights, one for his own on g3 with Nh5 at some point, and one for the black-squared B on g5. This leaves Black with a very bad black-squared B and not much counter-play. However with 13... h5!! the great Fischer forces 14. h4. How else can White save his e pawn? 14. Qd3 doesn't work; for example 14... b4. 15. Nd5 Nxd5 16. Bxd5 Bxd5 17. Bxe7 Qb6+ 18. Kh1 Bc4. After the forced 14. h4, white is strategically lost, as Fischer proves.

Sep-16-09  dTal: I dont know about putting the line out of business though, instead of 13. 0-0 White could play 13. Nh5 and his position would be OK I think. Fischer showcased his amazing positional insight backed up by razor sharp tactics, and knew the exact moment that his opponent made a mistake.
Nov-22-11  qqdos: <dTal> Daniel King's 1993 book Winning with the Najdorf analyses this game. His alternative to 13.0-0 is 13.Bxf6 Nxf6 14.Nh5 (but...Rxc3!). On 13...h5! he says: "A sensational move. Byrne must have been completely demoralised ... suddenly finding himself without a hope". In summarising: "I don't think it is an exaggeration to say that after 13...h5! Black has a winning position....As a consequence ... White players experimented with other attacking methods." What would Houdini say? - we need one of DrMal's exhaustive analyses!
Nov-22-11  Marmot PFL: <On 13...h5! he says: "A sensational move. Byrne must have been completely demoralised ... suddenly finding himself without a hope". >

Today that idea seems common enough, often used by Topalov and others, but well ahead of it's time when played.

Nov-22-11  King Death: Byrne came up with a nice try in a bad position in 23.Rh3 (23...Nd3 24.Rh8+ Kd7 25.Ba4+), but Fischer brushed him aside with ease.
Jul-22-12  Ghuzultyy: For some excellent annotations of this game take a look at Simple Chess by John Emms. It is the 3rd game in the book.
Jul-22-12  RookFile: Simple chess? 13.... h5!! might be a lot of things, but it's not that.
Jul-23-12  RookFile: <Hesam7: White is strategically lost.>

He might have been later, but you showed the wrong diagram. White has a plan to put the bishop on g5, knight on h5, and kill things that control d5. He got into trouble when he castled kingside later, 13.0-0 was an error.

Consider this game, for example:

R Cosulich vs Minic, 1970

Aug-23-12  Hesam7: <RookFile: He might have been later, but you showed the wrong diagram. White has a plan to put the bishop on g5, knight on h5, and kill things that control d5. He got into trouble when he castled kingside later, 13.0-0 was an error.

Consider this game, for example: R Cosulich vs Minic, 1970>

White's plan is just too slow. Also White is lost in the game you link, after: 15. ... Nxe4! 16. Nxg7+ Kf8


click for larger view

White does not have a proper defense. His best try ends up in a hopeless position: 17. f6 Bxf6 18. Nf5 (18. Nh5? Bh4+) 18. ... Rg8 19. Rf1 d5 20. Qh5 Rg6


click for larger view

Aug-23-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <AzaleaCastle: Hi all. What if 29 Qh8+ Kc7 ? I think there is still a game right?>

I am six years late, but no. After 29....Kc7 Black is threatening 30....Bg3+ 31.Ke2 Qf2+ 32.Kd3 (32.Kd1 Qe1#) e4+! 33.Kxe4 Qe2+ 34.Kd4 Be5#. White has no better answer than giving up his queen.

Feb-06-13  RookFile: Hesam, black threw an exchange out the window before. Who says white is obligated to take that pawn on g7?
Feb-06-13  LIFE Master AJ: Impressive game ...
Feb-08-13  Hesam7: <RookFile: Hesam, black threw an exchange out the window before. Who says white is obligated to take that pawn on g7?>

Here is the position after 15...Ne4! in R Cosulich vs Minic, 1970:


click for larger view

Beside 16 Ng7 what moves are left? 16 O-O? Qb6 and Black is winning; 16 Qg4? Bh4 is equally bad. The best seems to be 16 Qf3 Bg5 17 O-O O-O 18 Kh1 Qb6


click for larger view

Black' advantage is undisputable. Just in terms of material he already has a pawn for the exchange and sooner or later he will win the pawn on c3 as well ...

Feb-08-13  RookFile: What happens if he wins two pawns for the exchange - white resigns?
Feb-08-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime: I love this site!

There's a two year hiatus on this thread and then < AzaleaCastle > enters the fray ...

And is summarily ignored lol

Cool game.

Feb-09-13  Hesam7: <RookFile: What happens if he wins two pawns for the exchange - white resigns?>

Yes, unless you have some concrete analysis to keep him afloat ...

Feb-09-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: From <Hesam7>'s second diagram, not sure how much I like White's game after 19.Qg4 Bh6 (not, of course, 19....Nf2+ 20.Rxf2), or even 19....Kh8, avoiding some of White's little bag of tricks. The pawn at c3 is already consigned to perdition and the powerful dark-squared bishop makes progress difficult for the putative kingside attack.
May-11-14  sicilianhugefun: This is an epic struggle
May-11-14  Howard: Technically.......this great game never really took place.

Anyone care to guess why ?!

May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Don't have to guess: even 365chess lists Fischer's games from Sousse separately from those of the participants who played their full schedule.
Dec-15-14  RookFile: There is some interesting analysis here.

After 12. Ng3 Rc8 13. Bxf6 Nxf6 14. Nh5 Rxc3 15. bxc3 Nxe4, one line goes:

16. Nxg7+ Kf8 17. f6 Bxf6:


click for larger view

Now we read: 18. Nh5? Bh4+

Apparently, this check is supposed to end the discussion, but in reality, there is a lot of chess left to be played here. Also, I'm not sure that 18. Nh5 isn't white's best move!

18. Nh5 Bh4+ 19. g3


click for larger view

I freely confess that somewhere around here I get a headache and wonder why in the blazes anyone would play chess for a living.

Some possibilities:

19...... Nxg3 20. hxg3 Bxh1 21. Qe2!

White has a sneaky threat of Qf1 winning. It appears to me that black's king position is loose. Black is better, but the loose king means that white might be able to fight for a draw.

19..... Bg5 20. Rf1 I think white has some compensation because of black's loose king.

So, I grant you that black is better in these lines, but it is unclear if he's winning.

Jul-06-15  ToTheDeath: Classic Sicilian. ...h5! seems obvious nowadays but at the time it was a revelation. Another of Fischer's many contributions to the game.
Apr-24-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <RookFile....I freely confess that somewhere around here I get a headache and wonder why in the blazes anyone would play chess for a living....>

Never played this as White, but those who have seem to revel in these messy positions.

Oct-18-16  savagerules: "A mugging on the chessboard." That's what somebody, maybe Larry Evans, said about this game after ...h5. This is Fischer at his best and most inventive. Just steamrolling a strong GM like he's nothing.
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