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Vlastimil Hort vs Garry Kasparov
Cologne (1988), rd 1
Queen Pawn Game: Barry Attack. Gruenfeld Variation (D02)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-16-03  Dick Brain: the winning combination starting with 31...Rxe3+! is not that hard to see but what I really like is how Kasparov cleanly ends the game with 35...Qg2!. Some of us would be so happy to have got the winning position after the combination that we would relax a litte and possibly let our opponent get some counterplay.
Dec-16-03  OneBadDog: Isn't this a Grunfeld and not a KID?
Dec-16-03  nextgm: It is a King's Indian because Kasparov included 3. g6
Dec-16-03  Benjamin Lau: Did you mean 2...g6?
Dec-16-03  Dick Brain: I'd call it a Gruenfeld. It's not the move order but the final structure that is important.
Dec-16-03  karlo boytog: it is a kid yet it transposed to a grunfeld
Dec-16-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessgames.com: Doesn't White have to play c4 for it to be considered a Grunfeld?
Dec-16-03  Bears092: Although A48 is technically correct ECO, I think that D04 would work better.
Dec-16-03  refutor: d02 bears...d04 is e3 without playing the bishop out first, and yes it is *more* a grunfeld than a KID ;)
Dec-17-03  Spitecheck: It's not a KID or a neo-KID, d5 kills that idea, and as for a Grunfeld, the c4 move is missing and c3 is played later (Perhaps a NeoGrunfeld might apply :)). It's best described as an Uncommon Queen's Pawn in my eyes. Especially as white has not fianchettoed either of his bishops. Black's setup is typical of either the Grunfeld (or the Slav if your determined enough), and in 1988 Kasparov was still playing the Grunfeld like a conveyor belt...he may have been hoping for a position sim to one of them lines he and Karpov were keeping as pets in the mid 80's to early 90's.

Spitecheck

Dec-01-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: <From "Kasparov's Chess Openings" by Otto Borik (one of my favorite books!) some great comments on this game.>

How does White play against a system in which White advances his d-pawn but does not follow it up with c4? Club-players often ask me this question, especially those normally patient with their fellow man but in this case become annoyed when faced as Black with such a solid set-up.

At the end of 1988, in a match with the exiled Czech grandmaster Vlastimir Hort in Cologne, the World Champion provided an impressive example of an active strategy for Black in this line. The match formed part of a publicity week sponsored to the tune of 300,000 DM ... with the winner receiving a limousine. Kasparov duly won the match 2.5-1.5 points and gave us in the very first game a speldid solution to the problem: Black to play and win against the Queen's Pawn Opening.

. . .

6...♗g4

Once again, Kasparov begins the unlikely looking plan of taking over control of e5 ... We say 'unlikely' because at the moment this square is controlled three times by White and not once even by Black! The f3 knight will first be eliminated and White can hardly prevent this by 7.♘e5? ♗xe2 8.♕xe2 ♘h5! 9.♗g3 (9.♗g5?? f6) ♘xg3 10. hxg3 f6 11.♘f3 e5 when Black has a strong center plus the two bishops.

7.h3

Perhaps White should castle here, since he can always play h3 later.

7 ...♗xf3
8. ♗xf3 c6
9. O-O ♘bd7
10. ♕d2 ♖e8

We can now see the resemblance to Romanishin vs Kasparov, 1976 : the f3 knight has gone, the c6/d5 set-up restricts White's KB and Black is aiming for ...e5. This is another key position to remember!

Oct-18-07  KingG: <Sneaky> Thanks for the annotations. Very interesting.
Oct-31-12  pablo333: The Barry Attack is one of those lines of play that's not so easy to play against. I love the way that Kasparov is able to make the dismantling of white's position look deceptively simple.
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