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Sergey Karjakin vs Magnus Carlsen
Corus (2010), Wijk aan Zee NED, rd 10, Jan-27
French Defense: Steinitz. Boleslavsky Variation (C11)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-28-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  percyblakeney: <Wow, this really wasn't the best day of the official site - first it crashes, then they're posting in it such utter rubbish...>

Indeed, it's rather humorous that the official site calls Carlsen's win <lucky> and equals it with Anand's winning from a lost position in that respect... To me it was one of Carlsen' most brilliant wins in a while. It is strange that they can state with such certainty that Karjakin had the advantage until he sacrificed the exchange (in what in fact already was a lost position to most commentators and engines). Maybe they just have gotten so used to that Carlsen's wins so often are attributed to "luck" that they couldn't imagine that the result could be explained in some other way :-)

Jan-28-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Ezzy: <zarg: my Russian is a tad rusty, but isn't Carlsen written with a <K> in Moscow already?>

Ray Robson's dad should know, he's a professor in Applied Linguistics.

This Carlsen dude really does make chess look easy. He plays a new opening and simply takes last years Corus winner apart.

It's perfectly set up for an exciting Corus finish. Kramnik has never won Corus, and he is in prime position to do so. Expect all his energy to go into the last 3 games, because the win is in sight and also the 2800 target is within his grasp.

I can't stop thinking about a Kramnik v Carlsen World Championship match. They have played some amazing games and would possibly be an all time classic.

Talking about all time classics, I think the Anand v Topalov match will be one of the best ever matches. Added to this the candidates matches and we have an incredible chess year ahead.

Jan-28-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Ulhumbrus: <<On 19 bg4 fxe5 20 Bxe6+ Kh8 White does not retreat the Rook but counter-attacks the Black Queen by 21 Nxd5> This just loses to 21...Qc6, too many white pieces are under attack. The somewhat ingenious 22.Bxd7 Qxd7 23.Nf6 doesn't help because of 23...Qf5, defending h7. > No, after 22 Bxd7 Qxd7 White does not try 23 Nf6 but just defends the N by 23 Rfd1 and White has a pawn as well as the initiative
Jan-28-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: No, after 22 Bxd7 Qxd7 White does not try 23 Nf6 but just defends the N by 23 Rfd1 and White has a pawn as well as the initiative>


click for larger view

"A pawn as well as the initiative" - hmmm... don't you see a tiny problem for White here? (hint: there's a big white piece right at the middle of the board which is attacked by a black pawn)

Jan-28-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Ulhumbrus: <"A pawn as well as the initiative" - hmmm... don't you see a tiny problem for White here? (hint: there's a big white piece right at the middle of the board which is attacked by a black pawn)> Oh dear. Back to the drawing board. On 19 Bg4 fxe5 20 Bxe6+ Kh8 an alternative to either 21 Nxd5 or 21 Rd1 is 21 Rd3. On 21...d4 if White plays 22 Nd5, one thing which Black must not play is 22..Qd6 23 f5 Bxd5?? 24 Qxh7+! Kxh7 25 Rg3 mate.
Jan-28-10  zarg: <sapfy: According to the round report on the official site, this was just another 'lucky Carlsen'-game>

What?!

.. it will be odd, if each time Carlsen outplays his opponent, commentators call that being <lucky>. When Carlsen succeed in the opening, he can make more than one player look bad.

Jan-28-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  KingG: The report on the official site is garbage. This is what it says about the Kramnik-Ivanchuk game: <Kramnik surprised Vassili Ivanchuk in an unusual variation of the Queen’s Gambit>.
Jan-28-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Tabanus: After backsliding from move 21 till 18...f6, Rybka 2.3.2a 19-ply

1. (-0.32): 19.exf6 Rxf6 20.Qe1 Rcf8 21.Bf3 Nb6
2. (-0.32): 19.Bd3 h6 20.Qg4 Qb6 21.exf6 Nxf6

I think already here Black's position is better than it should be.

Jan-28-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Hesam7: As a long time player of the French defense I am glad that world's #1 played it in a crucial game and won. I am just wondering what the he prepared for 3. Nd2 and 3. e5 ... I hope Carlsen keeps playing the French.
Jan-28-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  KingG: <I am just wondering what the he prepared for 3. Nd2 and 3. e5> I doubt he had prepared much in these lines. Karjakin is very principled in the opening, and almost always plays the same systems. This can be a strength, but can also be a weakness as Carlsen showed in this game. I think it's fine to always play a certain way if you know in advance that your opponent plays the french for example. But it's probably best to have a back-up in case you get surprised. It should also be said that Karjakin's results in the Steinitz French aren't exactly spectacular, which may have further incouraged Carlsen/Kasparov to prepare this line.
Jan-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Tabanus: 17.Qg3 Bxd4 18.Rxd4 f6 19.exf6 Rxf6 20.Qe3 Rcf8 and Black is very fine. After 16...Bc5 (backslided), 21-ply:

1. (-0.02): 17.Kg1 Bxd4+ 18.Rxd4 Nb6 19.Qf2 Rb8
2. (-0.04): 17.Qd2 Rfd8 18.Kg1 g6 19.Qe3 Bxd4

Trying out line 1, 18...f6 19.exf6 Rxf6 20.Bg4 Qb6 21.Qe3 g5 22.fxg5 Rxf1+ 23.Kxf1 e5 24.Bxd7 Rf8+ wins the exchange.

Apparently White gets nothing out of 11.Kh1. After 8.Be2 0-0 9.0-0 f6 10.exf6 Nxf6 Black is fine also.

Jan-29-10  The Rocket: horrible play by karjakin starting with qh5? instead of the natural qf2. and this was already at move 17... quite poor given its a super gm.

white has lost all of his theoretical advantage after qh5.

Jan-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Tabanus: A) 17.Qf2 Bxd4

18.Rxd4 f6 19.exf6 Rxf6 20.Qe3 Rcf8 Black is fine
18.Qxd4 probably best ...

B) 17.Qf2 <f6> probably best, 18.exf6 Rxf6 (18.Bg4 f5)

19.Kg1 Rcf8
19.Qe3 Bxd4
19.Bxc5 Nxc5

What says Rybka 3 ?

Jan-31-10  Mostolesdude: I love how the black king became an aggressive fighting piece as soon as the queens came off the board.
Feb-05-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  ConLaMismaMano: I don't know why but this game reminds me of a chat Ivanchuk and Short had not long ago.

Ivanchuk, among other things, asked Short why did Kasparov quit and why didn't he pick up the french defense. Short was surprised to these questions as he didn't have a clue.

My crazy thought is that Kasparov got inspired by Ivanchuk and suggested Carlsen to study and play the French!!

Feb-05-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  ConLaMismaMano: This crazy thought came to mind when i remembered that Kasparov has always had high respect for Ivanchuk's analysis.

This was mentioned by Kramnik (just before the 2000 WCC) when he played some internet blitz against who he thought was Shirov and every time omitted to play the variation that he then put into practice in the WCC when he beat Kasparov's Gruenfeld.

If i remember correctly Kramnik didn't try this variation against "Shirov" thinking that Kasparov had evaluated it as plain bad because Ivanchuk had said so after a game of his own.

But as we can see Kramnik thought otherwise or just wanted to trick Kasparov believing he wouldn't pay enough attention to this variation.

Well, i don't know where i'm going with this hehe

Feb-07-10  Steve.Clark: I'm probably missing something stupid, but what's wrong with 24. Nd5 Bd5 25. Rd5. Black has 25 ... Nf4. Is that so strong?
Feb-07-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: <Steve.Clark: I'm probably missing something stupid, but what's wrong with 24. Nd5 Bd5 25. Rd5. Black has 25 ... Nf4. Is that so strong?>

Very strong. if 26 Rd4 Qc5 27 Rd7 Nxd3 28 Rxd3 Qxg1+! with mate to follow on the f file.


click for larger view

So White has to play 27 Rxf4 just losing the exchange.

Feb-07-10  Steve.Clark: <tamar: <Steve.Clark: I'm probably missing something stupid, but what's wrong with 24. Nd5 Bd5 25. Rd5. Black has 25 ... Nf4. Is that so strong?>

Very strong. if 26 Rd4 Qc5 27 Rd7 Nxd3 28 Rxd3 Qxg1+! with mate to follow on the f file. So White has to play 27 Rxf4 just losing the exchange.>

You're right. But he seems better off after 27 Rf4 Rf4 28 Qd1 than in the game. He might have a chance at a draw.

Feb-07-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: Well I guess it would be hard just to agree to toss an exchange to a player who has never seriously played the French.

Karjakin seemed to be in shock, and made one inaccuracy after another.

Feb-07-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <I guess it would be hard just to agree to toss an exchange to a player who has never seriously played the French.>

However, he did just that two moves later anyway...

Feb-07-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessmensch: This is the featured game in the NY Times chess column on Feb 7.
Feb-19-10  hstevens129: It's great how Carlsen uses his rook in the endgame, controlling the open files and restricting the movement of White's king, but otherwise barely moving it.
Feb-19-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  polarmis: Karjakin recently gave a Russian interview with a few comments that could relate to this game: http://others.sport-express.ru/revi...

On Corus:

"I should have beaten Smeets, I had a nice advantage against Caruana, and I was in no way obliged to lose to Carlsen. I mixed up everything conceivable in the opening, putting the pieces on the wrong squares, and then choosing the wrong moment to become active. Instead I could just have made a dull draw. A small excuse might be that I had a bad cold for the whole tournament".

On being one of Ponomariov's seconds against Ivanchuk:

"Ponomariov made me responsible for the French Defence. And it was in the French Defence that he won the first game in the match! Maybe a coincidence, and maybe not". (admittedly Ponomariov won with white!)

On whether Kasparov gives Carlsen a lot:

"I think so, yes. He shows him the correct approach, offers a lot of recommendations in the opening. But it's still possible and necessary to beat Magnus. For example, when we played in last year's Wijk the evaluation of my position varied from "better" to "lost", and it ended in a draw! So he still gives you chances, but you need to sense the moment to take advantage of them!"

Aug-14-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Ulhumbrus: An alternative to 8...0-0 is 8...a6 keeping the option of castling on the Queen's side
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