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Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin
Tata Steel (2012)  ·  Queen's Indian Defense: Kasparov-Petrosian Variation. Main Line (E12)  ·  0-1
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Given 4 times; par: 119 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 11 OF 11 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-24-12  dumbgai: Bravo Sergey.
Jan-24-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Серёжа молодец!
Jan-24-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <cro777> Catching you here for an off-topic:

Do you have more infos about Leonardo Ljubicic ?

He is #20 in the recent ICCF rating list with an ELO of <2639> and 378 rated corr games.

Thanks in advance! :D

Jan-24-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Karjakin analyses the game: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QoGl...
Jan-24-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  brankat: Great game by Karjakin.
Jan-24-12  Fanques Fair: After 19 - ... , d3 ! , it seems White is lost, because 20 - Bxa8 , Qd4 + , 21- Kh1 , d2 , and now if 22 - Bc6 , dxe1+ 23 - Qxe1, Rc8 , followed by Qxf4 , while 22-Rxc5 , dxe1+ , 23- Qxe1 , Qxc5 and the exchange decides in Black's favor...maybe White´s best chance was 20 - Rxc5,Qd4 + , 21- Kh1 , Qxc5 , 22- Bxa8, Rxa8 and the powerful d3 pawn is still alive ... or , in this last line, 22- Qxd3 , Qxd3 23- Bxd3, with a pawn for the exchange.
Jan-24-12  galdur: 17.f4 instead of the natural Nb5 in this position seemed to start white´s troubles, from which he couldn´t recover. Nice win by Karjakin.


click for larger view

Jan-24-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Karjakin knows how to use the king in the endgame. Carlsen's king is hiding.
Jan-24-12  tonsillolith: Wow, I didn't know Carlsen sucked so bad.
Jan-24-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: 37 Re4 was a better try. Karjakin said in the interview that he was going to play 37...Nf3+ 38 gxf3 Qd6+ 39 Kg2 Qxd3 but after 40 Qb4 the win is still hard to convert.
Jan-24-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <tamar: 37 Re4 was a better try. Karjakin said in the interview that he was going to play 37...Nf3+ 38 gxf3 Qd6+ 39 Kg2 Qxd3 but after 40 Qb4 the win is still hard to convert.>

Nice variation and interesting position, to boot. Suppose Black continues <40...Rf5>. White can (again) force a trade of Queens, probably with <41.Qd4+> (and not Qc3+), but the rook endgame looks hard to hold. Not only has White a pawn deficit, but his remaining pawns are weaker than those of Black.

Jan-25-12  rilkefan: <<Fanques Fair>: After 19 - ... , d3 ! , it seems White is lost, because 20 - Bxa8 , Qd4 + , 21- Kh1 , d2 , and now if 22 - Bc6 , dxe1+ 23 - Qxe1, Rc8 , followed by Qxf4>

After say 24.Bf3 in your line ...Qxf4 loses to 25.b4. Black can play ...Qxb2 instead, though after 25.e6 white has a bit of activity. Instead 23...Nd3 aiming at f2 and f4 looks strong.

Jan-25-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Wow, what a crush! Carlsen is the victim of a "karjakin."
Jan-25-12  HeMateMe: Nice squeeze. Even the MC can lose.

What happens if MC doesn't play 28. Bxd3? Black just swings the knight over to e4, forcing a trade for the Bishop, then maybe Q-e4-e2, swapping Queens and bringing the passed pawn to the 2nd rank?

Jan-25-12  solskytz: I'm sure Karjakin feels great right now - much like Reti in New York 1924
Jan-25-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  brankat: <solskytz> <I'm sure Karjakin feels great right now - much like Reti in New York 1924>

Carlsen did lose a few games in last ten years though :-)

Jan-25-12  SChesshevsky: <<galdur: 17.f4 instead of the natural Nb5 in this position seemed to start white´s troubles, from which he couldn´t recover. Nice win by Karjakin.>>

I agree. It looks like 17.f4 was a loose move. I wonder if he played it quickly?

I'm guessing White was expecting 19...Nxe4 as 19...d3 was a pretty brutal interpolation.

Jan-25-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Bobby Fiske:

GM PUZZLE
Black to play. Forced win in 43 moves:


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Jan-25-12  ikipemiko: <HeMateMe: ...What happens if MC doesn't play 28. Bxd3? > His bishop is hanging, also Ne4 is really powerful - attack to the king (via f2), attacking the queen, attacking the rook on c3... a lot of winning ways. B:d3 seems only move but Carlsen is maybe dead lost at that point.
Jan-25-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: "Gypsy: <tamar: 37 Re4 was a better try. Karjakin said in the interview that he was going to play 37...Nf3+ 38 gxf3 Qd6+ 39 Kg2 Qxd3 but after 40 Qb4 the win is still hard to convert.>

Nice variation and interesting position, to boot. Suppose Black continues <40...Rf5>. White can (again) force a trade of Queens, probably with <41.Qd4+> (and not Qc3+), but the rook endgame looks hard to hold. Not only has White a pawn deficit, but his remaining pawns are weaker than those of Black."

Hard to hold the rook ending, but at least there is hope. For example after 41 Qd4+ Qxd4 42 Rxd4 Rc5 45 b3 axb3 46 Kg3 Kf6 47 Rb4 Ke5 48 Rxb3 Kd4 49 Rb4+ Kc3 the following position arises where I would not know how to win as Black.


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May-05-12  Sigmapt: very good game GG!
Dec-17-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  iking: <tonsillolith: Wow, I didn't know Carlsen sucked so bad.>

he is not invincible .... but he is the reigning ELO topnotcher right now, above all the pampered goldfish in the aquarium.

Carlsen is the best!!!

Apr-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: Karjakin's only classical win against Carlsen, so it will get a lot of attention between now and November.

The opening is analyzed in Colin Crouch's <Magnus Force>.


click for larger view

Crouch queries 13.Ne5, writing:

<In a position such as this, White should be prepared to keep his center really solid, maneuvering his pieces, and waiting for the correct moment to open up the pawn center. The onus is on Black to decide what to do with his pawns. If he exchanges on d4, Black has an isolated pawn on d5 and a bad bishop on b7. If, however, he were to play an early ...c4 instead, White will find his time to break with e4, with more space in the center. Black has only a narrow flank of attack on the queenside, with ...Nc7, ...b5, ...a5 etc, whereas White can use both pawns and pieces to add pressure on the center and kingside.

It follows that both players would want to complete their developments before opening up the pawn center, it being too early to push the pawns. 13.Bb1 Re8 14.Qc2 g6 15.Rfd1 would, for example, keep on the pressure. White is now ready to exchange on c5, with Ba2 to follow. Black probably has not fully equalized.>

17.f4 is a mistake, as several kibitzers have pointed out. Crouch recommends 17.Nb5 Nxd3 18.Qxd3 Ba6 19.Qb3 Bxb5 20.Qxb5 a6 21.Qb3 Ra7=. Presumably Carlsen didn't realize that he should already be seeking to equalize. Karjakin suggested 17.Bf1, but Crouch thought White would still be worse after 17....a6. I would think that the pawn on d5 is worse than the pawn on e5, but apparently the reverse is true.

18.Ne4 is a (consistent) blunder. Crouch writes: <When a strong player gets on a wrong thread, he can go spectacularly wrong. The danger is he will continue to play the game logically, as he sees it, but if the logic is faulty, almost every move will make things worse. It is not just a case of making a few random errors, it is more that the move he is aiming for is just one big mistake. > Carlsen clearly overlooked the entire ...Bxe4, ...d3 idea. Crouch points out that Karjakin could have gone wrong in turn with 18....Qd5, after which 19.Qg4 completely turns the tables: 19....Bxe4 20.Bxe4, 19....Kh8 20.Bc4.

But after 18.....Bxe4! 19.Bxe4 d3, if 20.Bxa8 d2 21.Bc6 Crouch gives 21....Qd4+ 22.Kh1 dxe1/Q+ 23.Qxe1 Nd3 24.Qf1 Rd8 25.Rc1 Nxf4 and the pawn on e5 will fall.

Definitely not normal Magnus, since he was basically busted coming out of the opening, but still very powerfully played from beginning to end by Karjakin.

Apr-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  suenteus po 147: <keypusher> Thanks for highlighting this game and sharing the analysis summation. It's hard to believe Karjakin has only won one game against Carlsen in classical time controls! <Definitely not normal Magnus, since he was basically busted coming out of the opening> This makes me wonder if this is where Karjakin will devote his energies if he comes to the same conclusion here: try to bust Carlsen in the opening. It makes a kind of sense based on what I've seen and read about Carlsen's play. If you can create a decisive advantage in the opening, then that's the best chance to beat him. Of course that's extremely difficult to do....
Apr-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <suenteus po 147: <keypusher> Thanks for highlighting this game and sharing the analysis summation. It's hard to believe Karjakin has only won one game against Carlsen in classical time controls! <Definitely not normal Magnus, since he was basically busted coming out of the opening> This makes me wonder if this is where Karjakin will devote his energies if he comes to the same conclusion here: try to bust Carlsen in the opening. It makes a kind of sense based on what I've seen and read about Carlsen's play. If you can create a decisive advantage in the opening, then that's the best chance to beat him. Of course that's extremely difficult to do....>

It's fair to point out that Carlsen has only managed three wins against Karjakin. That's one reason I was rooting for Caruana in the Candidates' tournament.

As I'm sure you know, this win didn't owe anything to opening prep from Karjakin. He played one of his usual solid debuts. Presumably he was as surprised as anyone when Carlsen screwed up, but he was certainly ready to take advantage!

Carlsen doesn't screw up often, of course, but he's human. And it doesn't always happen in the opening. In this game

Carlsen vs Karjakin, 2012


click for larger view

After 46.Rd5? Karjakin had the opportunity to play 46....Rxb2+ 47.Nxb2 fxe4 and, believe it or not, White would have had to give the rook back, with a difficult ending.

So who knows? Maybe K will just play super-solid and hope Carlsen hands him a couple of opportunities. We could be in for a pretty dull match.

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