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Anton Korobov vs Vladimir Kramnik
World Cup (2013), Tromso NOR, rd 5, Aug-24
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Leningrad Variation (E30)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 7 OF 7 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-24-13  DcGentle: Korobov missed some move as well. <49. Bb4!> was due.
Aug-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  e4ia: Koro is letting Vlady off the hook with inferior time trbl. moves + the enormous pressure to have to win!
Too bad if Koro goes out today;
He played well enough to win!
Aug-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: sheesh. forget it.. way past it now. they are blitzing this out with low time it seems
Aug-24-13  MrSpock: Now it look like a draw.
Aug-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  e4ia: A Houdini draw! Dam!
Post game interview should be rich!
Aug-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Draw agreed! Congrat to Kramnik reaching the semi-final
Aug-24-13  DcGentle: Kramnik must have seen ghosts when moving the d-pawn. Was this a fortress or not? I am quite sure it was.
Aug-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: 41. Rd7 or 42. Rd7 seem so painfully obvious now. Maybe the engines or a good player see something I'm missing.
Aug-24-13  DcGentle: Anyways, Kramnik was lucky. ;-)
Aug-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessgames.com: Thanks to everybody for stopping by today. The next live game will be Monday morning at 9am USA/Eastern--hope to see you then!
Aug-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: Fabulous feature of Chessgames.com. We need more paying members to faciliate more live games.
Aug-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: 45...d4 is still a mystery to me.
Aug-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  e4ia: If 45...d4?? 46.exd4, and your blk plan is what? esp at ...46 Now you have to defend another dark sq passer at d8... The white B is a monster; active rook on the 7th etc
Basically d4 is resignable at the +2600 level or less

(and the W K comes up)

Aug-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  e4ia: Vlady interview now on that chessworld cup site
Aug-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  e4ia: Sorry d4 was actually played!
Vlady was very " lucky" that Koro was in time pressure!

But we'll see Korobov again!
Quite a talent who had left chess for + four years, and is a bit rusty perhaps!

Aug-24-13  Hesam7: Poor play from Kramnik, maybe after two weeks he is getting really tired? Anyway he got a big advantage out of the opening and had he played <18...Bd3!> he might have won the game before the first time control. <19 Nc1 c4 20 Nd3 cd3>


click for larger view

White's problem is that he can't really defend against ...Ne4 without losing material. My engine came up with <21 c4 Qc4 22 Rc1 Qd5 23 Rc3 d2 24 Re2 Ne4 25 Rc2 Qb5 26 h3 Rc8 27 Rc8 Rc8 28 Rd2 Nd2 29 Qd2 Rd8>


click for larger view

I think Black has a substantial, almost winning, advantage here.

Aug-24-13  csmath: I noted that before - had Kramnik lost this game he would have been the first big name to lose as black in this "Benoni" line (4.... c5, 5.d5 e6) of Leningrad. To be more precise, since Tony Miles in 1982. There is a bite to it but not enough to surprise solid NID black players.

By the way, Kramnik's opening is immaculate model play in this line. This is clearly the best play for black in the first 13 moves.

Aug-24-13  csmath: Korobov's missed win:

35. f4?

This is missed:

35. Rab1 c3
36. Rb8 Bf3+
37. Kg3 Kf8
38. e4

and now black has two losing options:

(A)
38. ...c2
39. exf5 cxb1Q
40. Rxb1 Bd5
41. f3 with Rh1 etc

or

(B)
38. ... Rxf6
39. Rxe8! Kxe8
40. gxf6 c2
41. Rc1 Bxe4
42. Kf4 Bh7 [Bg6 is the same]
43. Ke5

here the plan is either to block bishop with f4 and f5 or to pick up black pawns on the queenside depending what the next move of black would be.

Here is the best defence for black:

43. ...Kd7
44. f4 Bd3
45. Kd4 Bg6
46. Re1 Kd6
47. Be4 Kd2
48. Bd5 a3

and black position is hopeless.

Aug-24-13  Hesam7: <csmath: I noted that before - had Kramnik lost this game he would have been the first big name to lose as black in this "Benoni" line (4.... c5, 5.d5 e6) of Leningrad. To be more precise, since Tony Miles in 1982. There is a bite to it but not enough to surprise solid NID black players.

By the way, Kramnik's opening is immaculate model play in this line. This is clearly the best play for black in the first 13 moves.>

I was not aware about playing this setup (Benoni with the Bishop on b4) against Leningrad, I thought as Black you had two choices (and both of them are more than fine for Black):

1. the Karpov approach where Black closes off the center with ...Bc3, ...d6 and ...e5, and plays like the Huebner Wall variation of 4 e3 line of Nimzo,

2. the Averbakh gambit, here is the main line 5...h6 6 Bh4 b5!? 7 de6 fe6 8 cb5 d5 9 e3 O-O


click for larger view

here is a classic from 40 years ago: Spassky vs Tal, 1973.

Aug-24-13  csmath: The second possible (a lot more difficult so I am not sure here) win Korobov missed:

49. Bb4 Rxd5

50. Kc3 Rf5 [50....Bf1, 51.Re7 Kd8, 52.Rxf7 Rd3+, 53.Kc2 Rg3, 54. Rf6 is completely hopeless]

51. Rxa6 Rxf4 ["inhuman" 51. ...Bf1 is a possible alternative, everythig else loses. 51. ... Bf1 is inconclusive, there is a likelyhood of a draw in this continuation.]

52. Ra8+ Kd7
53. a6 Be4
54. Rg8 Rf2
55. a7 Ra2
56. Rf8 Bd5
57. Kd4 Ke6
58. Re8+ Kd7
59. Re5 Bb7
60. Bc5 Rg2
61. Kxc4 Bc6
62. Rf5 Rg4+
63. Bd4 Ke7
64. Kc5 Ba8
65. Bf6

and rook manouvres to the last rank with king supporting the passer.

This is so technical that I doubt it is possible to see over the board but it was there and it was missed.

Aug-24-13  csmath: <@Hesam7>

I am very much aware of Spassky-Tal game as I am somewhat of an afficionado of Boris "Carlsen" Spassky even in the games he lost.

===

<@Korobov-Kramnik>

This is extremely difficult and complex ending to play OTB. I am not surprised by the errors. I am somewhat surprised by less than optimal (to be honest - *lousy* is the right word) play by Kramnik in the middlegame even to the point of gifting pawns for no apparent reason.

Aug-25-13  Hesam7: <csmath: By the way, Kramnik's opening is immaculate model play in this line. This is clearly the best play for black in the first 13 moves.>

Why the first 13? 13...Re8 seems forced and the next 5 moves actually get Black to a nearly winning position.

<csmath: I am very much aware of Spassky-Tal game as I am somewhat of an afficionado of Boris "Carlsen" Spassky even in the games he lost.>

I did not mean that you were unaware, but generally the Averbakh gambit is quite unknown because Leningrad is so rare these days.

<csmath: I am somewhat surprised by less than optimal (to be honest - *lousy* is the right word) play by Kramnik in the middlegame even to the point of gifting pawns for no apparent reason.>

I agree, going from a nearly won position (after 18 d6) to a lost one (after 34...Rf5, based on your analysis) is quite incredible for someone of Kramnik's caliber.

Aug-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: <csmath: Korobov's missed win: 35.Rab1>


click for larger view

Here "35.Rab1 was probably the best chance for Korobov to equalize the match.

Kramnik moved on with a draw despite his best efforts to lose. He was better out of the opening but then made several small mistakes. Every time he reached equality he would give Korobov another opportunity to play for a win." (Garry Kasparov)

Oct-31-13  qqdos: <csmath> in the 35.Rab1! line, ...c3 may not be the best answer - because of 38.Bxc3 in your analysis. Kramnik might have been better off sac-ing the exchange with 35...Rxf6 36.gxf6 Re6 37.Rb8+ Kh7 38.Rh1+ Kg6 39.f3 and now ...c3 40.Kf2.Any thoughts?
May-04-14  1d410: Kramnik doesn't want perfect play. He wants to screw up human players that can't understand his wild positions.
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