chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Ivan Bukavshin vs Ildar Khairullin
Russian Superfinals (2015), Chita RUS, rd 5, Aug-13
Queen's Indian Defense: Classical. Traditional Variation (E17)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 6 more I Bukavshin/I Khairullin games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can get computer analysis by clicking the "ENGINE" button below the game.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: The material is identical.

Black threatens 56... Qxf2+ 57.Kh1 Qg2# and Rxa5.

With such threat there are only three possible moves: 56.Ng5+, 56.Rxf7+ and 56.Nd2.

-----

White can clear the f-file with tempo and try to protect f2 with 56.Ng5+:

A) 56... hxg5 57.Rxf7+

A.1) 57... Kg8 58.Rxf6 Kg7 (due to Qxd5+ and Qb8+) 59.Rf3 with an extra pawn and a won position. For example, 58... Rxa5 59.Qb7+ Kh6 (59... Kg8 60.Qf7+ Kh8 61.Qf8+ Kh7 62.Rf7#; 59... Kh8 60.Rf8#) 60.Rf8 wins.

A.2) 57... Kh6 58.Rxf6 with an extra pawn (58... Rxa5 59.Qb1 and mate soon).

A.3) 57... Kh8 58.Qb8+ Ng8 59.Qe5+ and mate in two.

B) 56... Kg7 57.Rxf7+ Kh8 (57... Kg8 58.Qb8+ Ne8 59.Qxe8#) 58.Qb8+ (or 58.Rh7+ and mate in two) 58... Ng8 59.Rh7#.

C) 56... Kg8 57.Rb8+ Kg7 (57... Ne8 58.Rxe8+ Kg7 59.Qc3+ and mate in two) 58.Ne6+

C.1) 58... fxe6 59.Qb7+ Nd7 60.Qxd7+ Kf6 61.Rf8+ Ke5 (61... Kg5 62.Qe7#) 62.Qc7+ Ke4 63.Rf4+ Kd3 64.Rd4#.

C.2) 58... Kh7 59.Nf8+

C.2.a) 59... Kh8 60.Ne6+ Kh7 (60... Ng8 61.Qc3+ f6 62.Qxf6+ Kh7 63.Qg7#) 61.Nf8+ repeats moves.

C.2.b) 59... Kg8 60.Ne6+ Kh7 (60... Ne8 61.Rxe8+ doesn't improve Black's chances) 61.Nf8+ as above.

C.2.c) 59... Kg7 60.Ne6+ repeats moves.

D) 56... Kh8 57.Rb8+ Kg7 (57... Ng8 58.Qc3+ and mate in two) 58.Ne6+ transposes to C.

-----

The alternative 56.Rxf7+ Kg8 57.Qb8+ (57.Qxa2 Qxa2 58.Rxf6 Qxa5 59.Rxg6+ Kh7 and the a-pawn decides the game) 57... Kxf7 58.Qxa7+ Ke8 (58... Ke6 59.Nd4+ and 60.Nxe2 + -) 59.Qb8+ Ke8 doesn't seem to achieve more than a risky perpetual.

-----

The only remaining move is 56.Nd2 Q(R)xd2 (56... Kg7 57.Qxa2 wins) 57.Rxf7+ Kg8 (57... Kh8 58.Qb8+ Ng8 59.Qe5+ Nf6+ 60.Qxf6+ Kg8 61.Qg7#) 58.Rxf6 is similar to A above.

----

I'd play 56.Nd2.

Aug-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: I missed the obvious 57... Ne4, although the answer 58.Rxf7 was rather easy.

I wasted too much energy trying to make 56.Ng5+ work, the move which at first glance looked more promising to me.

If I remember correctly it was Timman who said that 50% of lines are unimportant but we don't know which half in advance...

<Patriot> Thank you! Perhaps you know whether Dan Heisman has some advice about detecting the right half.

Aug-06-16  mel gibson: The move I saw:
56. Rxf7+

also works but
not as fast as the text move above.

Aug-06-16  agent48: I realize that I'm chess blind but for the love of God and money......why cant the rook just take d2? I just cant find the win for white. ex..57. rxf7+ kg8 58..qb8+ kxf7. Wouldn't black at least draw by perpetual?
Aug-06-16  Patriot: <agb2002> I knew you would find the key move! Good job.

I wasted a lot of time on 56.Rxf7+ before realizing it doesn't work. Then I moved on to 56.Ng5+ only to find a draw with best play.

<Perhaps you know whether Dan Heisman has some advice about detecting the right half.> Kind of. He says to "look wide before you look deep". But sometimes I don't think it is unavoidable--it takes calculation to find the nuances and sometimes dismiss a candidate completely. Dan would identify the killer move, ...Qxf2+ and ask "What are all the candidates that immediately stop the threat?" Then he teaches to look at least 3-ply with each candidate and find out which candidates can be dismissed right away, if any. So in the case of 56.Nd2, at 4-ply ahead 56...Rxd2/Qxd2 57.Rxf7+ Kg8 58.Rxf6 leaves it at least a viable candidate at that point. It's not easy to dismiss any one of the candidates Rxf7+, Ng5+, or Nd2 in short order so you pretty much have to examine each. But I think you did the right thing by examining Ng5+ in detail. Dan may suggest "progressive deepening" where you look at each candidate progressively deeper, switching between them--at least that's my understanding. For me, that taxes my visualization skills too much--I'm better off continuing on the same candidate and then moving on to the next after I'm done!

Aug-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: <agent48> <I realize that I'm chess blind but for the love of God and money......why cant the rook just take d2? I just cant find the win for white. ex..57. rxf7+ kg8 58..qb8+ kxf7. Wouldn't black at least draw by perpetual?>

White has something better. After 56 Nd2 Rxd2 57 Rxf7+ Kg8 white wins with 58 Rxf6.


click for larger view

White now has a mate threat beginning with 59 Qb8+. If 58...Kg7 then 59 Rf3 (or Rf4).


click for larger view

Black now cannot prevent 60 Qb8 seeing 61 Qf8+ without giving up his queen. If he tries 59...Rb2 then 60 Qc3+ is a forced mate.


click for larger view

Aug-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: < al wazir: Why didn't white play 27. Ne5 ? I don't see how black can defend the c-♙. >

after 27. Ne5 Rce6 the E pawn comes under attack and the c pawn can be defended. For example.. 28.f4 (28.Nf3 Rxe2) f6 29.Nf3 Re4 30.Qd1 Qe6 31.Nd4 Qg4

Aug-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: < agent48: why cant the rook just take d2? >

After 56.Nd2 if ..Rxd2 57.Rxf7+ Kg8 58.Rxf6 and white picks up a pawn while defending f2.

Aug-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: < Jimfromprovidence: >

ah! I see you beat me to the punch. No wonder you have that big smile! lol

Aug-06-16  NBZ: Nd2! did not even occur to me. I went with Ng5 which only draws.
Aug-06-16  NBZ: Sadly Ivan Bukavshin, who played the White pieces with such skill in this game, died early this year at the age of 20. RIP.
Aug-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: < Jimfromprovidence: After 56 Nd2 Rxd2 57 Rxf7+ Kg8 white wins with 58 Rxf6. >

Stockfish 7 gives mate in 16

50/51 39:44 2,940,546k 1,233k -M16
Kg8-g7 Rf6-f4 Qe2-a6 Qb3-c3+ Kg7-g8 Qc3xd2 Qa6-c6 Qd2-d4 Qc6-b7 a5-a6 Qb7-c6 Qd4-e5 d5-d4+ Kg2-g3 Qc6-d7 Qe5-b8+ Kg8-h7 Qb8-b7 Qd7-g7 Rf4-f7 Qg7xf7 Qb7xf7+ Kh7-h8 Qf7xa7 h6-h5 Qa7-e7 d4-d3 a6-a7 h5-h4+ Kg3-g2 Kh8-g8 a7-a8Q+

Aug-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: My 7-year-old grandson and I play and analyze a lot of games. When we run across a strong surprise move in our games, or during analysis, we often exclaim "What! What's going on here!"

That was my reaction when I looked at the answer to today's Saturday puzzle and saw the strong clearance and obstruction move 56. Nd2!

My weaker attempt (computer's third choice) at getting out of trouble and avoiding a Black mate was 56. Qxa2 Qxa2 57. Rxf7+ Kh8 58. Rxf6 with a difficult and unclear position for both sides.

The game move and puzzle solution 56. Nd2! gets White out of trouble and as a bonus yields a strong winning position.

If Black captures the obstructing Knight with either the Queen or the Rook, White gets a winning attack with his heavy pieces against the more exposed Black King.

Following the Rook capture line with 57. Rxf7+ Kg8 58. Rxf6 (diagram below),


click for larger view

Deep Fritz 15 at 23 depth calculates a mate in 79 moves after 58...Kg7 59. Rf4 .

Following the Queen capture line with 56... Qxd2 57. Rxf7+ Kg8 58. Rxf6 (diagram below)


click for larger view

Deep Fritz 15 at 20 depth calculates a clear win for White after 58. Rb2 Qa3 (+4.99 @ 20 depth, Deep Fritz 15).

In the game Black saw the Knight was poison and opted instead for 56...Kg8 57. Qxa2 .

Black could have gone for a cheapo draw with 57...Nxg4!? when 58. hxg4? allows a draw by repetition after 58...Qxg4+ =.

However, after 57....Nxg4!? White preserves the win with 59. Kh1! (diagram below)


click for larger view

as the threat of 59...Kxf7 60. fxe3 (+2.34 @ 19 depth, Deep Fritz 15) proves decisive.

According to the computers, White had a much stronger continuation after 56...Kg8 with the in-between move sequence 57. Rb8+ Kg7 58. Qxa2 (+9.48 @ 18 depth, Deep Fritz 15).

Even stronger according the silicon monsters was 57. Rb8+ Kg7 58. Qb4 forcing mate-in-sixteen (Deep Fritz 15 @ 19 depth).

Aug-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: <PawnSac> <Stockfish 7 gives mate in 16>

Thanks for posting that line.

<plumbst> <Ah, nice move by White - interfering the 2nd rank and opening up the f-file. 57.Rb8+ would've been a quicker win though.>

Yes, in the text black could have played 57...Nxg4, threatening 58...Qxf2+. This forces 58 Rxf7 and black has 58...Nxe3+, below, (protecting the d5 pawn first) and black can take the rook next move. (giving up his knight with white's next move.)


click for larger view

But this scenario does not help after 57 Rb8+ as this forces 57...Kg7. Now after 58 Qxa2, below, black playing either 58...Nxg4 or 58...Ne4 loses to 59 Qb2+ and white keeps his rook advantage.


click for larger view

Aug-06-16  morfishine: Shrewd. Took me awhile to understand <56.Nd2> and why 56...Rxd2 fails ultimately.
Aug-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: <Patriot: <agb2002> I knew you would find the key move! Good job.>

Thank you!

<I wasted a lot of time on 56.Rxf7+ before realizing it doesn't work. Then I moved on to 56.Ng5+ only to find a draw with best play.>

When I started typing my post I thought 56.Ng5+ was the winning move with a won ending or a forced mate and the other two not so direct or even losing. However, I was unable to fix the C.2 lines.

<<Perhaps you know whether Dan Heisman has some advice about detecting the right half.> Kind of. He says to "look wide before you look deep". But sometimes I don't think it is unavoidable--it takes calculation to find the nuances and sometimes dismiss a candidate completely. Dan would identify the killer move, ...Qxf2+ and ask "What are all the candidates that immediately stop the threat?">

That's why I consider the opponent's threats immediately after counting the material and before elaborating a solution.

<Then he teaches to look at least 3-ply with each candidate and find out which candidates can be dismissed right away, if any. So in the case of 56.Nd2, at 4-ply ahead 56...Rxd2/Qxd2 57.Rxf7+ Kg8 58.Rxf6 leaves it at least a viable candidate at that point. It's not easy to dismiss any one of the candidates Rxf7+, Ng5+, or Nd2 in short order so you pretty much have to examine each. But I think you did the right thing by examining Ng5+ in detail. Dan may suggest "progressive deepening" where you look at each candidate progressively deeper, switching between them--at least that's my understanding.>

I think Kasparov used to follow a similar method. I remember he mentioned something about this in 'How Life Imitates Chess'.

<For me, that taxes my visualization skills too much--I'm better off continuing on the same candidate and then moving on to the next after I'm done!>

It obviously requires a lot of concentration, discipline and energy.

To complicate things one might be in a hurry to take children to school or prepare their breakfast or even stand the attack of one of them with his phaser aiming at you while the toy gun emits quite a few colored lights and shouts continuously "shields unavailable..shields unavailable.." (it actually happened to me while I was typing the C lines!).

Aug-06-16  Patriot: <agb2002> <To complicate things one might be in a hurry to take children to school or prepare their breakfast or even stand the attack of one of them with his phaser aiming at you while the toy gun emits quite a few colored lights and shouts continuously "shields unavailable..shields unavailable.." (it actually happened to me while I was typing the C lines!).> LOL--How did you even make it to the C lines?? :-)
Aug-06-16  drollere: interesting position: material and space are both about equal, and include mutual interpenetrating attacks. but black's next 56. ... Qxf2+ Kh1 Qg2# must determine white's plan.

white has no move to protect f2, and preparing flight with Kg3 seems grim. Ng5+ pxg5 or Nd2 Rxd2 seem pointless.

56. Rxf7+ Kh8 puts the K on the back rank but Qb8+ loses the R, and Qb7 to hold the R allows black's attack.

the escape appears to be an evaporation strategy:

56. Qxa2 Qxa2
57. Ne5 Qxa5
58. Rxf7+ Kg8
59. Rxf6

now white has R+N v black's Q+Rp, with hopes either of killing off the Rp or trading R for Q with a N v pawns ending.

Aug-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: Saturday 56.?


click for larger view

My (sub-perfect) thinking:

I saw the twin objectives of (1) attack black's king and (2) don't get mated by ..Qxf2+ etc. To do both, have to move the Nf3 with tempo so that I can follow with Rxf7+ and Rxf6 such that my rook guards Pf2.

So I opened with <56.Ng5+>, expecting <56...hxg5>


click for larger view

Now I have <57.Rxf7+ Kg8 58.Rxf6 Kg7 59.Rf3>


click for larger view

My rook is preventing ...Qxf2, and I threaten Qb7+ which carries a potent attack in store that black is ill-equipped to stop.

~~~~

Checking with the computer: The good news is that the final position in my line above is mate in 22! The bad news is that black had some better options.

First, instead of taking my N, black should play <56...Kg8!>, and with black threatening mate, all I can do is perpetual check: <57.Rb8+ Kg7 58.Ne6+>


click for larger view

And now <58...Kh7!>, since 58...fxe6? 59.Qb7+ with mate to follow.

Second, even if black takes N, <56...hxg5 57.Rxf7+> black is "less bad" with <57...Kh6>, and may even be able to salvage a draw after <58.Rxf6 Ra1 59.Qxd5 Qf1+ 60.Kg3 Qg1+ 61.Qg2 Qxg2 62.Kxg2 Rxa5>


click for larger view

~~~~

Thankfully, I never play people who would be good enough to decline the poisoned knight. :-)

Aug-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: <Patriot ... LOL--How did you even make it to the C lines?? :-) >

I suggested him to attack his mother. One must be deaf to be able to keep the concentration with a robotic voice repeating 'shields: unavailable'...

Aug-06-16  King.Arthur.Brazil: Sorry, but 56.Nd2 is not a winning move, it is a drunk's move. Black simply didn't take the N?And move teh K to lose the R??? 56... Rd2 and white resigns... It is a good joke! Good weekend for you... lgs
Aug-06-16  devere: 56.Nd2!! is a tactical theme I had never before seen in a chess game. It seems to be a weak obstruction of Black's mate threat, but at the same time it clears a line for the distant White rook to come to the defense. My admiration to the late Grandmaster Bukavshin for finding this brilliant move.
Aug-07-16  Virgil A: 56.Nd2 is the only good move. But hard to find. Maybe if one is in the flow of the game it would be less than hard to find Nd2.
Aug-07-16  steinitzfan: Superb play, and 56Nd2 will stay with me for a while.
Aug-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <PawnSac: after 27. Ne5 Rce6 the E pawn comes under attack and the c pawn can be defended. For example.. 28.f4 (28.Nf3 Rxe2) f6 29.Nf3 Re4 30.Qd1 Qe6 31.Nd4 Qg4.> You're right, the ♘ has to retreat from e5 and the ♙ on e2 is vulnerable.

Better is starting with 27. bxc4. If 27...Nxc4, then 28. Qxd5, and now black doesn't have time to take the e-♙. If instead 27...dxc4, then 28. Ne5 Rce6 29. Nxc4 Rxe2 30. Ne3.

search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any member Iincludinfgall Admin and Owners or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. If you think someone is an idiot, then provide evidence that their reasoning is invalid and/or idiotic, instead of just calling them an idiot. It's a subtle but important distinction, even in political discussions.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
QID.Classical. Traditional Var (E17) 1-0 56.?
from Qside Fianchettos; Zukertort, QID & Tartakower by fredthebear
56.? (August 6, 2016)
from Saturday Puzzles, 2011-2017 by Phony Benoni
Instructive
by akatombo
56.? (Saturday, August 6)
from Puzzle of the Day 2016 by Phony Benoni


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC