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Vladimir Kramnik vs Ding Liren
World Championship Candidates (2018), Berlin GER, rd 7, Mar-18
English Opening: King's English. Four Knights Variation Flexible Line (A28)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: 63...Qe8
Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: Hmmm, and don't ask me for tips on the basketball tournament either!
Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jack Kerouac: That rabbit running. As mentioned before..
Mar-18-18  Octavia: i didn't see the last moves. Why didn't the Q take the p when it was on h6?
Mar-18-18  7he5haman: <Octavia> if Qxh6 then Re7+!
Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jack Kerouac: Interesting how a K-B pawn never moves and is a crux to the whole game.
Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: <Octavia>There was a royal fork trick with Re7+
Mar-18-18  WorstPlayerEver: After 65. Ng4 Black has winning chances.
Mar-18-18  Octavia: thank yous!
Mar-18-18  WorstPlayerEver: Ding missed 65... Qh4
Mar-18-18  WorstPlayerEver: Kramnik missed 67. Nh6+
Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: < Kramnik missed 67. Nh6+ > He probably just decided against it: 67.Nh6 Kxg6 68.h8Q Qxh6 ... =
Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jack Kerouac: Even at top level chess, Fischer understood mistakes can be made. Kramnik knows as well. That's why they're both former World Champions.
Mar-18-18  WorstPlayerEver: <Gypsy>

Probably, but I guess both players know it's a draw anyway by now.

Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: There are still legal moves to continue the game. (Gustafsson)
Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: Finally drawn.
Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <WorstPlayerEver:... Probably, but I guess both players know it's a draw anyway by now. >

I am quite a sure of that. They were fishing in muddy waters, especially big Vlad. But the water got free of all silt.

Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: Vlad won the post-mortem again. In that regard, he combines the qualities of his great predecessors, the two Ks.

<<The main difference [with Kasparov] is that Karpov hardly ever tries to prove objective truths. Karpov's sole wish is to show his opponent that in any given position that might have occurred in the game he would have played better. I witnessed a fine example of this at this year's Las Palmas tournament. After a fairly regular draw with Ivan Morovic, Karpov, who had played the white pieces, sat down to show that he had missed some practical chances. Among the endless variations and regroupings there were certainly enough moments where Karpov could claim an edge, but the overall impression with the onlookers was that Morovic had never been in any real trouble. Having analyzed the more cautious approaches for more than an hour Karpov decided to have a go at some wilder attacking schemes. At first he was quite successful in tricking the unprepared Morovic,but gradually suitable defences for Black were found. At one point Morovic even defended so well that he got a raging counterattack. Quietly he evaluated, 'Now, I'm much better.' Karpov contemplated the position for a split second, moved a few pieces and challenged him saying, 'I'm not so sure. I play this and this and it's not easy for you.' With a resigned expression Morovic mumbled, 'Ah, I see. I'm never better.' He had finally understood.> -- Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam, Finding Bobby Fischer> Anatoly Karpov

Ding, too, was never berrer.

Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Afternoon: Ding Liren must feel rather frustrated right about now--no matter how hard he fights, he can't even lose, let alone win.

Kramnik set up a great fortress with 32.Rc4! He even tried to snatch a win with 56.g4!?, but that had no chance of fooling Black. The one move that puzzles me most consists of 8.b3. New theory, perhaps? In my time, would play 8.Rb1,a5; 9.a3,Nh5; 10.b4,axb4; 11.axb4,f5; 12.b5,Ne7 with bloodthirsty complications.

Mar-18-18  Mr. Bojangles: In the press conference, Kramnik was so optimistic about his position that it was embarrassing to watch. “In fact white is much better here”, “I am completely winning here” lol. Ding kept laughing and saying “no”.

The truth is there was never a moment when Kramnik was better, let alone winning. Ding was better for most of the game and never worse off. Carlsen had characterised Kramnik’s post game analysis as utter nonsense. I couldn’t agree more with him.

Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: < Kramnik was so optimistic about his position that it was embarrassing to watch.>

For embarrassing, read entertaining. Why would a clash of opinions between world class players be embarrassing?

<The truth is there was never a moment when Kramnik was better, let alone winning.>

Vlad's main point was that White is strategically winning after 32.Rc3, holding onto the extra pawn:


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No doubt, this assessment is correct unless Black succeeds in breaking up White's kingside carapace, starting with ...h5, as, I believe, Ding whispered. Kramnik will probably task Anish with demonstrating White's decisive advantage, thereby taking up several pages of the next <New In Chess>.

Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: (Fun) fact: Kramnik has never lost a single game in a post-mortem analysis during his career!!
Mar-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: For those that remember Kramnik's safety-first approach as world champion, the way he plays now is a real treat. One can only imagine that Giri must be tearing his hair out.
Mar-18-18  Kaspablanca: I see many Kramnik haters here:)
Mar-19-18  ex0duz: Lol I feel sorry for ding. His games are all wild and entertaining and yet if you just look at his score you'd think he's doing a giri/leko etc
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