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MATCH STANDINGS
Lichtenhein - Montgomery Match

Theodore Lichtenhein7.5/10(+7 -2 =1)[games]
Hardman Philips Montgomery2.5/10(+2 -7 =1)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Lichtenhein - Montgomery Match (1861)

8 January 186116 January 1861, Philadelphia Chess Club

<A Chess Match Between Philadelphia And New York.—A grand Chess match is now in progress between Mr. Montgomery, the champion of Philadelphia Chess players, and Mr. Lichtenhein, the champion of the New Yorkers. After many delays and postponements, the contest commenced on Tuesday evening, at the rooms of the Philadelphia Chess Club, in the presence of a large concourse of the princpal sic chess players of the city. The first winner of seven games to be the victor of the match. Mr. Lichtenhein drew the first move, and Mr. Montgomery played what is known as the "Petroff defence." The game lasted nearly three hours, and was won in good style by Mr. Lichtenhein. The second game, an "Evans Gambit," commenced yesterday morning. It was won by Mr. Montgomery in two hours. The match is to be continued daily from 11 A.M. to 2 P.M. and from 5 to 8 P.M.>
Source: Philadelphia Inquirer, 1861.01.10, p1

<The Great Chess Match.—The fourth game of the match between Messrs. Montgomery and Lichtenhein, commenced on Thursday morning. Mr. Lichtenhein adopted the cautious policy of a close game, playing what is known as the "French opening." The game was hotly contested for seven hours, and was the finest exhibition of play yet made in this match. Mr. Lichtenhein finally proved victorious, thus equalizing the score, which now stands Lichtenhein 2, Montgomery 2.>
Source: Philadelphia Press, 1861.01.12, p2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 Wins Lichtenhein 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 Montgomery 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Lichtenhein had White in the odd numbered games.

Format: First to seven wins, draws not counting, to be the victor.

<The Lichtenhein-Montgomery Match.—The account of this interesting match, which we copied from the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin, immediately after the conclusion of the match, and before the return of Mr. Lichtenhein to the city, although written in as friendly a spirit to the New York Champion, as humble pride and a not altogether last sense of justice would permit, requires to be corrected. Mr. Lichtenhein never informed any one "that his original intention was to play open games, but that he was convinced, after the third game, that if he wished to win the match, he must take Mr. M. off his strongest ground, and meet him in close games." The remark which Mr. Lichtenhein made was, that he had intended to play open games, and that if Mr. Montgomery had given him a chance to select his openings, he would have done the same. After Mr. M. had played the Petroff defence in the first game, Mr. L. gave him a chance to select his opening in the second, and when the Philadelphia Champion did not return the compliment in the third game, Mr. Lichtenhein very properly did not continue to let Mr. Montgomery select the openings for the attack as well as for the defence.

We would like to be informed where the "prevalent notion that Mr. Lichtenhein is an extremely slow player" exists. Certainly not in New York. This "notion" must have originated somewhere in the interior of Pennsylvania, or was it to serve as one of the necessary excuses for the defeat of the Philadelphia Champion? When, finally, the Bulletin "chooses to place upon record the indisputable fact that Mr. Montgomery was physically unfit to engage in this match at this time," we choose to place upon record the indisputable fact that Mr. Montgomery told one of his most intimate friends, a day before the commencement of the match, "that he never felt better in his life, and expected to play a pawn and move stronger than he had ever done before.">

Source: Hazeltine Scrapbook, v2, p115

 page 1 of 1; 10 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. T Lichtenhein vs H Montgomery 1-0441861Lichtenhein - Montgomery MatchC42 Petrov Defense
2. T Lichtenhein vs H Montgomery  0-1261861Lichtenhein - Montgomery MatchC27 Vienna Game
3. H Montgomery vs T Lichtenhein  1-0281861Lichtenhein - Montgomery MatchC52 Evans Gambit
4. H Montgomery vs T Lichtenhein  0-1601861Lichtenhein - Montgomery MatchC00 French Defense
5. T Lichtenhein vs H Montgomery  1-0371861Lichtenhein - Montgomery MatchC43 Petrov, Modern Attack
6. H Montgomery vs T Lichtenhein  0-1601861Lichtenhein - Montgomery MatchC00 French Defense
7. T Lichtenhein vs H Montgomery 1-0381861Lichtenhein - Montgomery MatchC42 Petrov Defense
8. H Montgomery vs T Lichtenhein  ½-½311861Lichtenhein - Montgomery MatchC01 French, Exchange
9. T Lichtenhein vs H Montgomery  1-0601861Lichtenhein - Montgomery MatchC77 Ruy Lopez
10. H Montgomery vs T Lichtenhein  0-1451861Lichtenhein - Montgomery MatchC01 French, Exchange
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

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