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  1. "The 100 Best Games," (of the 20th Century).
    Maybe one of my very favorite chess books would have to be:

    <"The 100 Best Chess Games, of the 20th Century." (ranked) Hardback - by MacFarland Books, Copyright (c) 2000. ISBN: 0-7864-0926-6;> Library binding, :50# alkaline paper.

    <Andy Soltis is a prolific author,> (http://www.worldchesshof.org/hall-o...) he has written many books that I like. But this book is probably my #1 favorite of the multitude of chess books that he has had published over the years. [NO - the games are not all perfect ... and YES - there are mistakes in his analysis, any good engine ... (currently Jan. 2012) ... will readily reveal this.]

    But it is just the quality of the games (that he has chosen). Nobody, anywhere, ever brought games of this importance and interest (to the master-level player) to the general, chess-playing public.

    <Half of the games in this book, I have deeply analyzed,> many of these games I have created web pages on. (Look through the kibitzes - IF you are interested. Or - see the page, http://www.ajschess.com/lifemastera... and look for my "Top Ten" list.)

    This Game Collection is NOT about me, but about Andy Soltis and the games. Some of these games are just as Soltis describes them ... quite simply 100 of perhaps the most beautiful, most artistic and simply wondrous chess games of the 20th Century.

    I am NOT asking you to agree with me or even agree with GM Andrew Soltis. All that I would like for you to do is to peruse these equisite chess pearls, and examine each one for yourself. If you do this - as I have done, many times - I have no doubt that you will be blown away by some of these historic, wonderful and exciting diamonds of the chess board. (Note: If you see asterisks next to the game, it means that - somewhere - I have a web page on that game and you could find it with any search engine. This is not a plug/ad for me, but just to let you know that I have deeply annotated many of the games on this list. <No other game collection - on this site - can make such a claim.>)

    <Enjoy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!>

    [Asterisks - I use three, when there is enough room - indicate that I have a web page on that particular game. There are at least 25 games here that have independent web pages on one of my chess sites! I usually give the URL - for my web page - in the comments/kibitzing section ... found under the game.]

    100 games, 1902-1999

  2. 100 Chess Masters Trade Secrets -Soltis
    Games from an instructive book I own. I think this is one of Soltis better books. It consists of 4 sections of priyomes-1) 25 Key Priyomes 2) 25 Must know endgame techniques 3) 25 crucial sacrifices 4) 25 exact endings.

    If you like this sort of thing, it is worth picking up or suggesting to your public library to add it to their collection. (Coach K started a collection on this which I am working to fill in some of the blanks; thanks Coach K).

    24 games, 1783-2007

  3. 1000 Best Short Games of Chess
    Compiled by Irving Chernev in 1954, and a favorite from my young days. Back in the 1960s, I checked it out of the public library and determined to play through all the games by hand during the three week loan period. I did so, but was fortunate that Carpal Tunnel Syndrome had not yet been invented.

    But the experience drilled basic mating and tactical patterns into my head, forming the basis of my later chess style. For better or for worse.

    The games are arranged by length (from 4 to 24 moves). Chernev does abbreviate a few favorites to squeeze them in within the limit, and there are all the usual apocryphal games. But don't worry about it. This is a collection for fun, and who knows? You might even learn something. I did. (Hold on--let me think of a better example.)

    187 games, 1560-1990

  4. 125 Greatest Chess Games
    according to The Mammoth Book of The World's Greatest Chess Games, New Expanded Edition, by Graham Burgess, John Nunn, and John Emms.

    # above the game represents how many votes it gets by these 3 authors.

    In several games here, some opening move orders are slightly different from the book.

    125 games, 1834-2010

  5. 50 games better than that other Tal game.
    51 games, 1953-1989

  6. 98_A07_King's Indian Attack
    The King's Indian Attack (or KIA), also known as the Barcza System (after Gedeon Barcza), is a chess opening system for White.

    The opening is not a series of specific moves, but rather a system that can be played from many different move orders. Though the KIA is often reached via 1.e4 followed by d3, Nd2, Ngf3, g3, Bg2, and 0-0, it can also arise from 1.g3, 1.Nf3, or even 1.d3

    The King's Indian Attack (or KIA), also known as the Barcza System (after Gedeon Barcza), is a chess opening system for White.

    The opening is not a series of specific moves, but rather a system that can be played from many different move orders. Though the KIA is often reached via 1.e4 followed by d3, Nd2, Ngf3, g3, Bg2, and 0-0, it can also arise from 1.g3, 1.Nf3, or even 1.d3

    Barcza System[edit]
    a b c d e f g h
    8 Chessboard480.svg a8 black rook b8 black knight c8 black bishop d8 black queen e8 black king f8 black bishop g8 black knight h8 black rook a7 black pawn b7 black pawn c7 black pawn e7 black pawn f7 black pawn g7 black pawn h7 black pawn d5 black pawn f3 white knight g3 white pawn a2 white pawn b2 white pawn c2 white pawn d2 white pawn e2 white pawn f2 white pawn h2 white pawn a1 white rook b1 white knight c1 white bishop d1 white queen e1 white king f1 white bishop h1 white rook 8 7 7
    6 6
    5 5
    4 4
    3 3
    2 2
    1 1
    a b c d e f g h
    1.Nf3 d5 2.g3
    King's Indian Attack (A07) is 1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 (see diagram). Common Black responses are 2...Nf6, 2...c6, 2...Bg4, 2...c5, and 2...g6. Then White can play 3.Bg2.

    King's Indian Attack (A08) is 1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 c5 3.Bg2.

    1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Bg4 3.Bg2 Nd7 is the Keres Variation.

    Transposition from other lines[edit]
    1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 d5
    1. Nf3 c5 2. g3 d5

    Transposition to other lines[edit]
    1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. d4 (D02)

    Famous games[edit]
    The following games are perhaps the most famous examples of the KIA.

    Fischer–Myagmarsüren, Sousse Interzonal 1967
    1.e4 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.g3 c5 5.Bg2 Nc6 6.Ngf3 Be7 7.0-0 0-0 8.e5 Nd7 9.Re1 b5 10.Nf1 b4 11.h4 a5 12.Bf4 a4 13.a3 bxa3 14.bxa3 Na5 15.Ne3 Ba6 16.Bh3 d4 17.Nf1 Nb6 18.Ng5 Nd5 19.Bd2 Bxg5 20.Bxg5 Qd7 21.Qh5 Rfc8 22.Nd2 Nc3 23.Bf6 Qe8 24.Ne4 g6 25.Qg5 Nxe4 26.Rxe4 c4 27.h5 cxd3 28.Rh4 Ra7 29.Bg2 dxc2 30.Qh6 Qf8 31.Qxh7+ 1–0[1] Réti–Rubinstein, Karlsbad 1923
    1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.c4 d4 5.d3 Bg7 6.b4 0-0 7.Nbd2 c5 8.Nb3 cxb4 9.Bb2 Nc6 10.Nbxd4 Nxd4 11.Bxd4 b6 12.a3 Bb7 13.Bb2 bxa3 14.Rxa3 Qc7 15.Qa1 Ne8 16.Bxg7 Nxg7 17.0-0 Ne6 18.Rb1 Bc6 19.d4 Be4 20.Rd1 a5 21.d5 Nc5 22.Nd4 Bxg2 23.Kxg2 Rfd8 24.Nc6 Rd6 25.Re3 Re8 26.Qe5 f6 27.Qb2 e5 28.Qb5 Kf7 29.Rb1 Nd7 30.f3 Rc8 31.Rd3 e4 32.fxe4 Ne5 33.Qxb6 Nxc6 34.c5 Rd7 35.dxc6 Rxd3 36.Qxc7+ Rxc7 37.exd3 Rxc6 38.Rb7+ Ke8 39.d4 Ra6 40.Rb6 Ra8 41.Rxf6 a4 42.Rf2 a3 43.Ra2 Kd7 44.d5 g5 45.Kf3 Ra4 46.Ke3 h5 47.h4 gxh4 48.gxh4 Ke7 49.Kf4 Kd7 50.Kf5 1–0[2] Another example is Deep Blue–Garry Kasparov, 1997 match, game 5. References[edit]
    Jump up ^ "Robert James Fischer vs Lhamsuren Myagmarsuren (1967) "A Night In Tunisia"". Chessgames.com. Retrieved 2007-04-19. Jump up ^ Richard Reti vs Akiba Rubinstein (1923) "Reti to Roll" Bibliography

    Smith, Ken and Hall, John (1988): King’s Indian Attack – A Complete Opening System also a Weapon to be used against …, Dallas Texas: Chess Digest, ISBN 0-87568-174-3 Dunnington, Angus (1998): The Ultimate King’s Indian Attack, London: B.T.Batsford Ltd, ISBN 0-7134-8222-2 Emms, John (2005): starting out: king’s Indian attack, London: Everyman Chess, ISBN 1-85744-394-2 Eggers, Heiko (2008): Theorie der Eröffnung - Königsindischer Angriff - Das Spielsystem mit dem Aufbau Sf3/g3/Lg2/0-0/d3/Sbd2/, Norderstedt: Books on Demand, ISBN 978-3-8334-3194-4 Further reading[edit]
    Hall, John (1972): A Complete Opening System for White: King’s Indian Attack, Dallas: Chess Digest Magazine, no ISBN Weinstein, Norman (1976): The King’s Indian Attack, Dallas: Chess Digest Magazine, no ISBN Schiller, Eric (1989): How To Play The Kings Indian Attack, Moon Township: Chess Enterprises, ISBN 0-931462-95-9 Norwood, David (1991): King’s Indian Attack, London: Trends Publications, without ISBN Tangborn, Eric (1992): A Fischer Favorite: The King’s Indian Attack – with 46 fully annotated Games, o.O.: International Chess Enterprises, ISBN 1-879479-07-9 Dunnington, Angus (1993): How to Play - The King’s Indian Attack - Openings, London: B.T. Batsford Ltd, ISBN 0-8050-2933-8 Henley, Ron and Hodges, Paul (1993): Power Play - The King’s Indian Attack, Hagerstown: R&D Publishing, ISBN 1-883358-02-7 Henley, Ron and Maddox, Don (1993): The ChessBase University BlueBook Guide To Winning With - The King’s Indian Attack, Hagerstown: R&D Publishing, ISBN 1-883358-00-0 Hall, John and Cartier, Jan R. (1996): Modern King’s Indian Attack – A Complete System for White, Dallas Texas: Hays Publishing, ISBN 1-880673-11-8 New In Chess Yearbook (1998): King's Indian Attack: Black castles kingside, Alkmaar: Interchess BV, Vol. 49, ISBN 90-5691-044-2, p. 186-190 New In Chess Yearbook (1999): King's Indian Attack, Alkmaar: Interchess BV, Vol. 50, ISBN 90-5691-047-7, p. 182-186 Maddox, Don (2002): Königsindischer Angriff - Schach Training, Hamburg: ChessBase GmbH, ISBN 3-935602-51-0 New In Chess Yearbook (2005): King's Indian Attack, Alkmaar: Interchess BV, Vol. 76, ISBN 90-5691-155-4, p. 228-232 Dzindzichashvili, Roman (2005): Easy Way to Learn The King’s Indian Attack, Internet: ChessDVDs.com, Roman’s Lab, Volume 28, Nr. 7-37885-35839-1 Davies, Nigel (2008): King’s Indian Attack, Hamburg: ChessBase GmbH, fritztrainer opening, ISBN 978-3-86681-071-6 External links[edit]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King's... http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C3%B... http://www.kenilworthchessclub.org/... http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/conte... King's Indian Attack (A07) King's Indian Attack (A08) Reti Opening (A06) http://www.ez-net.com/~mephisto/Und...

    check out: Game Collection: King's Indian ATTACK J. Emms ; Game Collection: King's Indian Attack ; Game Collection: Ataque Indio de Rey (KIA)

    208 games, 1899-2017

  7. 98_C40_Elephant Gambit
    <HIGHLY RECOMMENDED TO READ <!<!>!>!>

    http://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/2...

    (with a circular reference to this collection ;))

    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    <"Despite its name, the Elephant Gambit is a carnivore among chess openings!"> -- Tim Harding

    This is a fascinating opening that can yield great results against the unprepared. It makes for exciting Chess win or lose.

    The Elephant Gambit (also called the Queen's Pawn Counter Gambit or Englund Counterattack) is a rarely played chess opening beginning with the moves: <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d5!?>

    In this gambit, Black ignores the attack on his e-pawn and immediately tries to wrest the initiative from White. The main idea is that Black has sacrificed a pawn to gain a move and must obtain compensation for it. The resulting position can be sharp for White, and thus may be a good surprise opening for Black. It is generally considered unsound, because if White plays accurately Black does not get sufficient compensation for the sacrificed pawn. One of the Elephant Gambit's leading modern-day exponents is Philip Corbin.

    <Lines>

    Unfortunately, White is able to capture either of Black's center pawns with the advantage, either by 3. exd5 or 3. Nxe5. With a center pawn removed, Black is in a passive position with White clearly having the initiative as White controls more space. A typical line might continue

    a) <3.exd5 e4> (3...Qxd5 saves the pawn, but leaves White with a big lead in development after 4.Nc3) <4.Qe2 Nf6 5.d3 Qxd5 6.Nbd2 Be7 7.dxe4 Qe6> and White remains a pawn ahead, though Black's development is somewhat smoother.

    Alternatives are:

    b) <3...Bd6> (the Elephant Gambit proper) with <4. d4 e4 5. Ne5 Nf6 6. Nc3 0-0 7. Bc4> ..., but here White enjoys a distinct superiority, but no immediate attack, according to de Firmian.

    c) <3. Nxe5>, Black plays <3...Bd6 4. d4 dxe4 5. Bc4 Bxe5 6. Qh5 Qf6 7. dxe5>, which is thought to be slightly better for White.

    d) After <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d5 3. exd5 e4 4. Qe2>, Black plays <4...f5 5. d3 Nf6 6. dxe4 fxe4 7. Nc3 Bb4 8. Qb5+ c6 9. Qxb4 exf3> with 10. <Bg5 cxd5 11. 0-0-0 Nc6> as in Tal-Lutikov, Tallinn 1964 (see de Firmian) with advantage for White. The continuation of the game can be found here: [1].

    e) After <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d5 3. exd5 e4 4. Qe2 Nf6

    <e1) 5. d3 Be7 6. dxe4 0-0 7. Nc3 Re8 8. Bd2 Bb4 9. 0-0-0>, with advantage for White (de Firmian).

    <e2) 5. Nc3 Be7 6. Nxe4

    <e2a) 6...Nxd5 7. d3 0-0 8. Qd1 Bg4 9. Be2 f5 10. Ng3 Nc6 11. c3 with slight advantage for White, as in Salomonsson-H. Sorenson, Malmo 1982 (de Firmian).>

    <e2b) 6...0-0 7. Nxf6+ Bxf6 8. d4 Re8 9. Be3, with distinct superiority for White (de Firmian).>>

    f) <3. d4> can be used to enter some uncommon territory.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elepha...

    Countrin ze EG, by Eric Schiller: http://www.ericschiller.com/pdf/Ele...

    Elephant Miniatures, by H. Nakamura https://web.archive.org/web/2012051...

    35 games, 1792-2013

  8. 98_C40_Elephant Gambit
    <HIGHLY RECOMMENDED TO READ <!<!>!>!>

    http://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/2...

    (with a circular reference to this collection ;))

    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    <"Despite its name, the Elephant Gambit is a carnivore among chess openings!"> -- Tim Harding

    This is a fascinating opening that can yield great results against the unprepared. It makes for exciting Chess win or lose.

    The Elephant Gambit (also called the Queen's Pawn Counter Gambit or Englund Counterattack) is a rarely played chess opening beginning with the moves: <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d5!?>

    In this gambit, Black ignores the attack on his e-pawn and immediately tries to wrest the initiative from White. The main idea is that Black has sacrificed a pawn to gain a move and must obtain compensation for it. The resulting position can be sharp for White, and thus may be a good surprise opening for Black. It is generally considered unsound, because if White plays accurately Black does not get sufficient compensation for the sacrificed pawn. One of the Elephant Gambit's leading modern-day exponents is Philip Corbin.

    <Lines>

    Unfortunately, White is able to capture either of Black's center pawns with the advantage, either by 3. exd5 or 3. Nxe5. With a center pawn removed, Black is in a passive position with White clearly having the initiative as White controls more space. A typical line might continue

    a) <3.exd5 e4> (3...Qxd5 saves the pawn, but leaves White with a big lead in development after 4.Nc3) <4.Qe2 Nf6 5.d3 Qxd5 6.Nbd2 Be7 7.dxe4 Qe6> and White remains a pawn ahead, though Black's development is somewhat smoother.

    Alternatives are:

    b) <3...Bd6> (the Elephant Gambit proper) with <4. d4 e4 5. Ne5 Nf6 6. Nc3 0-0 7. Bc4> ..., but here White enjoys a distinct superiority, but no immediate attack, according to de Firmian.

    c) <3. Nxe5>, Black plays <3...Bd6 4. d4 dxe4 5. Bc4 Bxe5 6. Qh5 Qf6 7. dxe5>, which is thought to be slightly better for White.

    d) After <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d5 3. exd5 e4 4. Qe2>, Black plays <4...f5 5. d3 Nf6 6. dxe4 fxe4 7. Nc3 Bb4 8. Qb5+ c6 9. Qxb4 exf3> with 10. <Bg5 cxd5 11. 0-0-0 Nc6> as in Tal-Lutikov, Tallinn 1964 (see de Firmian) with advantage for White. The continuation of the game can be found here: [1].

    e) After <1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d5 3. exd5 e4 4. Qe2 Nf6

    <e1) 5. d3 Be7 6. dxe4 0-0 7. Nc3 Re8 8. Bd2 Bb4 9. 0-0-0>, with advantage for White (de Firmian).

    <e2) 5. Nc3 Be7 6. Nxe4

    <e2a) 6...Nxd5 7. d3 0-0 8. Qd1 Bg4 9. Be2 f5 10. Ng3 Nc6 11. c3 with slight advantage for White, as in Salomonsson-H. Sorenson, Malmo 1982 (de Firmian).>

    <e2b) 6...0-0 7. Nxf6+ Bxf6 8. d4 Re8 9. Be3, with distinct superiority for White (de Firmian).>>

    f) <3. d4> can be used to enter some uncommon territory.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elepha...

    Countrin ze EG, by Eric Schiller: http://www.ericschiller.com/pdf/Ele...

    Elephant Miniatures, by H. Nakamura https://web.archive.org/web/2012051...

    35 games, 1792-2013

  9. 98_C57_Fried Liver Attack
    just started this collection. It's pure fun to play over these games. ENJOY!!

    The <Fried Liver Attack>, also called the <Fegatello Attack> (named after an Italian idiom meaning "dead as a piece of liver"), is a chess opening. This colourfully named opening is a variation of the Two Knights Defense in which White sacrifices a knight for an attack on Black's king. The opening begins with the moves:

    < 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Nxd5 >

    This is the Two Knights Defense where White has chosen the offensive line 4.Ng5, but Black's last move is risky (other Black choices include 5...Na5, 5...b5, and 5...Nd4). White can now get an advantage with 6.d4 (the Lolli Attack). However, The Fried Liver Attack involves a far more spectacular knight sacrifice on f7, defined by the moves:

    <6. Nxf7 Kxf7>


    click for larger view

    Opening Explorer <74 games>

    The <Fried Liver> has been known for many centuries, the earliest known example being Polerio vs Domenico, 1610

    Play usually continues <7.Qf3+ Ke6> (not 7...Kg8?? 8.Bxd5+ with checkmate) <8.Nc3>.


    click for larger view

    Opening Explorer <48 games>

    Black will play <8...Nb4> or <8...Ne7> and follow up with ...c6, bolstering his pinned knight on d5. (If Black does play 8...Nb4, White can force the b4 knight to abandon protection of the d5 knight with the rather dubious 9.a3 Nc2+ 10.Kf1 Nxa1, although this involves giving up a further rook.) White has a strong attack, but it has not been proven yet to be decisive.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_Kn... Because defence is harder to play than attack in this variation when given short time limits, the Fried Liver is dangerous for Black in over-the-board play, if using a short time control. It is also especially effective against weaker players who may not be able to find the correct defences. Sometimes Black invites White to play the Fried Liver Attack in correspondence chess or in over-the-board games with longer time limits (or no time limit), as the relaxed pace affords Black a better opportunity to refute the White sacrifice.

    = = = =

    check Boris Alterman's blog on the FLA http://web.archive.org/web/20120224...

    check < 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Nxd5 <7.d4!!>>,


    click for larger view

    Opening Explorer as mentioned here: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fegat...

    12 games, 1610-2014

  10. Adam Hunt's ChessStrategy
    1 game, 1910

  11. Annotated games
    2 games, 1912-1995

  12. Attack and Defense by Hans Muller
    Here are some of the games includeded in the book attack and defense by Hans Muller.
    1 game, 1958

  13. Bobby Fischer Wins With The King's Indian Attack
    This collection contains some of Bobby Fischers wins playing the King's Indian Attack.
    15 games, 1956-1971

  14. Boris Spassky's 400 Selected Games
    Almost completed. 52?
    399 games, 1948-2002

  15. Botvinnik "100 Selected Games"
    Dover publisher
    87 games, 1926-1946

  16. C40 Latvian Gambit II
    Bilguer Variation 3.Ne5 Qf6 5.Nc4 5.Ng4
    48 games, 1837-2010

  17. C40 Latvian Gambit IV
    Mason Countergambit 3.d4

    Mlotkowski Variation 3.Nc3 fe4 4.Ne4

    Fraser Defense 3.Ne5 Nc6 4.Qh5 4.Nc6 4.d4

    44 games, 1872-2011

  18. Caro-Kann
    6 games, 1922-2014

  19. Chess training for post-beginners
    44 games, 1909-2005

  20. Curiosities
    1 game, 1954

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