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  1. 4-Ruy Lopez
    101 games, 1881-2005

  2. 98_C80-C83_Ruy Lopez, Open
    <1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4 Nf6 5 O-O Nxe4> Ruy Lopez, Open (C80)

    <1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4 Nf6 5 O-O Nxe4 6 d4 b5 7 Bb3 d5 8 dxe5 Be6 9 Qe2>
    Ruy Lopez, Open, Howell Attack (C81)

    <1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4 Nf6 5 O-O Nxe4 6 d4 b5 7 Bb3 d5 8 dxe5 Be6 9 c3>
    Ruy Lopez, Open (C82)

    <1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4 Nf6 5 O-O Nxe4 6 d4 b5 7 Bb3 d5 8 dxe5 Be6>
    Ruy Lopez, Open (C83)

    In the Open Defence, <3...a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Nxe4>, Black tries to make use of the time White will take to regain the pawn to gain a foothold in the centre, with play usually continuing <6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6>. Here 8.Nxe5, once adopted by Fischer, is much less often seen, and Black should equalise after the accurate 8...Nxe5 9.dxe5 c6, which avoids prematurely committing the light-squared bishop and solidly defends d5, often a problem in the Open.

    The Riga Variation, <6...exd4>, is considered inferior; the main line runs <7.Re1 d5 8.Nxd4 Bd6! 9.Nxc6 Bxh2+! 10.Kh1!> (10.Kxh2 Qh4+ 11.Kg1 Qxf2+ draws by perpetual check.) <Qh4 11.Rxe4+! dxe4 12.Qd8+! Qxd8 13.Nxd8+ Kxd8 14.Kxh2 Be6> (14...f5?? 15.Bg5#!) and now the endgame is considered to favour White after 15.Be3 or Nd2 (but not 15.Nc3 c5!, playing to trap the bishop).

    White has a variety of options at move nine, including 9.c3, 9.Be3, 9.Qe2 and 9.Nbd2.

    The classical line starts with <9.c3> when Black may choose from 9...Na5, 9...Be7 (the main line), and the aggressive 9...Bc5.

    After <9.c3 Bc5 10.Nbd2 0-0 11.Bc2>, Black must meet the attack on e4, with the following possibilities from which to choose: 11...f5, 11...Bf5, both of which aim to maintain the strongpoint on e4, or the forcing line 11...Nxf2, introduced by the English amateur Vernon Dilworth.

    Today, 9.Be3 Be7 10.c3 is often used to transpose into the main line, 9.c3, while obviating the option of the Dilworth.

    An old continuation is <11...f5>, when after <12.Nb3 Ba7 13.Nfd4 Nxd4 14.Nxd4 Bxd4> White can gain some advantage with Bogoljubov's 15.Qxd4. Instead, the very sharp La Grande Variante continues <15.cxd4 f4 16.f3 Ng3 17.hxg3 fxg3 18.Qd3 Bf5 19.Qxf5 Rxf5 20.Bxf5 Qh4 21.Bh3 Qxd4+ 22.Kh1 Qxe5>, with unclear consequences. Perhaps the most famous game in this variation is Smyslov–Reshevsky, 1945 USSR–USA Radio Match. An analysis of the line had just been published in a Russian chess magazine, and Smyslov was able to follow it to quickly obtain a winning position. Reshevsky had not seen the analysis and he struggled in vain to solve the position over the board with his chess clock running.

    The Dilworth Variation (or Attack), <11...Nxf2 12.Rxf2 f6 13.exf6 Bxf2+ 14.Kxf2 Qxf6> has scored well for Black, with many traps for the ill-prepared White player. The main line leads to unbalanced endgames which are difficult to play for both sides, though with a strong drawing tendency. Yusupov is one of the few grandmasters to often adopt the Dilworth.

    In the Howell Attack (ECO C81), <9.Qe2>, White aims for play against d5 after Rd1. The game usually continues <9...Be7 10.Rd1> followed by 10...Nc5 or 10...0-0. Keres played this line several times in the late 1940s, and it is sometimes named after him.

    Karpov's move, <9.Nbd2>, limits Black's options. In the 1978 Karpov–Korchnoi World Chess Championship match, following <9.Nbd2 Nc5 10.c3 d4> (10...Be7 is an old move that remains popular) Karpov introduced the surprising <11.Ng5!?>, a move suggested by his trainer, Igor Zaitsev. If Black takes the knight with 11...Qxg5 White regains the material with 12.Qf3. This variation played a decisive role in a later World Championship match, Kasparov–Anand 1995, when Anand was unable to successfully defend as Black.

    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruy_Lo...

    = = ♘xe4 = = ♘xe4 = = ♘xe4 = = ♘xe4 = = ♘xe4 = = ♘xe4 = =

    Related theory book: <Grandmaster Repertoire 13 - <The Open Spanish>> by Victor Markovich Mikhalevski

    http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/produ...

    = = ♘xe4 = = ♘xe4 = = ♘xe4 = = ♘xe4 = = ♘xe4 = = ♘xe4 = =

    check also: Game Collection: The Open Defence

    Spassky vs Keres, 1965
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 41 moves, 1/2-1/2

    corr
    Keres vs E Dyckhoff, 1935
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 54 moves, 1/2-1/2

    corr
    Keres vs G Friedemann, 1935
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 36 moves, 1-0

    Keres vs L Wildegans, 1936
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 46 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Keres vs Euwe, 1937
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 41 moves, 0-1

    Keres vs Fine, 1938
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 19 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Keres vs Euwe, 1939
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 41 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Keres vs Bronstein, 1946
    (C81) Ruy Lopez, Open, Howell Attack, 37 moves, 0-1

    Keres vs Alatortsev, 1947
    (C81) Ruy Lopez, Open, Howell Attack, 62 moves, 1-0

    Keres vs Reshevsky, 1948
    (C81) Ruy Lopez, Open, Howell Attack, 41 moves, 0-1

    Keres vs Levenfish, 1949
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 35 moves, 1-0

    Keres vs Averbakh, 1951
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 37 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Keres vs Lilienthal, 1955
    (C82) Ruy Lopez, Open, 37 moves, 1-0

    Keres vs Unzicker, 1956
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 25 moves, 1/2-1/2

    J Borisek vs V Mikhalevski, 2015
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 42 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Svidler vs Mamedyarov, 2015
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 32 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Karpov Gambit
    Shirov vs Timman, 1996
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 49 moves, 1-0

    Karpov Gambit
    G Swathi vs L Robichaud, 2006
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 32 moves, 1-0

    Karpov Gambit
    Shirov vs Anand, 2004
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 42 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Karpov Gambit
    Karpov vs Korchnoi, 1978
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 44 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Karpov Gambit
    Kasparov vs Anand, 1995
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 38 moves, 1-0

    Karpov Gambit
    Kasparov vs Shirov, 2001
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 38 moves, 1-0

    Karpov Gambit
    Judit Polgar vs Mamedyarov, 2002
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 23 moves, 1-0

    Karpov Gambit
    Svidler vs Anand, 1999
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 69 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Karpov Gambit
    Timman vs Smyslov, 1979
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 55 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Karpov Gambit
    J Cervenka vs K Dudek, 1998
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 24 moves, 1-0

    Kasparov vs E Magerramov, 1976
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 35 moves, 0-1

    Kasparov vs Yusupov, 1979
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 41 moves, 1-0

    Kasparov vs Anand, 1995
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 28 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Kasparov vs G Botteley, 1997
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 28 moves, 1-0

    Kasparov vs Kramnik, 2001
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 19 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Kasparov vs M Krasenkow, 2002
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 24 moves, 1-0

    Kasparov vs Shirov, 2004
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 40 moves, 1-0

    A Sokolov vs Yusupov, 1985
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 85 moves, 0-1

    Short vs Yusupov, 1985
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 28 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Tal vs Yusupov, 1985
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 19 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Huebner vs Ljubojevic, 1985
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 42 moves, 1-0

    Stein vs Suetin, 1962
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 19 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Stein vs Savon, 1963
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 32 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Stein vs Keres, 1967
    (C82) Ruy Lopez, Open, 40 moves, 1-0

    Carlsen vs Ding Liren, 2016
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 99 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Adams vs W So, 2016
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 33 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Adams vs J Smeets, 2007
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 47 moves, 1-0

    Sutovsky vs I Sokolov, 2005
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 57 moves, 0-1

    R T Black vs J Bernstein, 1913
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 40 moves, 1-0

    Pilnik vs Unzicker, 1952
    (C81) Ruy Lopez, Open, Howell Attack, 94 moves, 1-0

    Keres vs Euwe, 1948
    (C81) Ruy Lopez, Open, Howell Attack, 34 moves, 1-0

    Smyslov vs Euwe, 1948
    (C81) Ruy Lopez, Open, Howell Attack, 26 moves, 1-0

    Smyslov vs Reshevsky, 1948
    (C81) Ruy Lopez, Open, Howell Attack, 73 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Bacrot vs S P Sethuraman, 2016
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 34 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Fischer vs Larsen, 1966
    (C82) Ruy Lopez, Open, 30 moves, 0-1

    Fischer vs Unzicker, 1966
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 63 moves, 1/2-1/2

    Fischer vs H Ree, 1968
    (C81) Ruy Lopez, Open, Howell Attack, 25 moves, 1-0

    Fischer vs F Olafsson, 1966
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 37 moves, 1-0

    Tarrasch vs Chigorin, 1893
    (C82) Ruy Lopez, Open, 63 moves, 1-0

    D Kokarev vs Short, 2015
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 47 moves, 0-1

    Kholmov vs Y Kots, 1981
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 48 moves, 1-0

    Yifan Hou vs M Muzychuk, 2016
    (C80) Ruy Lopez, Open, 32 moves, 1-0

    V Zagorovsky vs Estrin, 1968
    (C82) Ruy Lopez, Open, 28 moves, 1/2-1/2

    J Boey vs Estrin, 1972
    (C82) Ruy Lopez, Open, 41 moves, 0-1

    Boleslavsky vs Ragozin, 1942
    (C82) Ruy Lopez, Open, 37 moves, 1-0

    Boleslavsky vs Botvinnik, 1943
    (C82) Ruy Lopez, Open, 89 moves, 1/2-1/2

    K B Richardson vs Estrin, 1978
    (C82) Ruy Lopez, Open, 38 moves, 1-0

    Janowski vs Tarrasch, 1896
    (C82) Ruy Lopez, Open, 68 moves, 0-1

    Caruana vs Wei Yi, 2016
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 32 moves, 1-0

    Mecking vs Korchnoi, 1974
    (C83) Ruy Lopez, Open, 35 moves, 1/2-1/2

    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    <Open Ruy w/ Black>:

    Viktor Korchnoi : http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... (95 games)

    Max Euwe http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... (60 games)

    Artur Yusupov : http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... (57 games)

    Victor Markovich Mikhalevski : http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... (43 games)

    Jan Timman : http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... (34 games)

    Wolfgang Unzicker : http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... (30 games)

    Siegbert Tarrasch :http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... (30 games)

    Sipke Ernst : http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... (24 games)


    286 games, 1854-2018

  3. Amazing Games
    1 game, 1964

  4. Anatoly Karpov - My Best 300 Games
    Complete games from the book.
    361 games, 1966-1998

  5. Banja Luka 1979
    The Banja Luka Chess Tournament held in Yugoslavia in 1979 was a category IX event. Sixteen grandmasters competed in a round robin format, including (in order of ELO): Tigran Petrosian (2610), Ulf Andersson (2560), Jan Smejkal (2550), Walter Shawn Browne (2540), Andras Adorjan (2525), Bojan Kurajica (2515), Slavoljub Marjanovic (2505), Roman Hernandez (2500), Milorad Knezevic (2500), Enver Bukic (2495), Aleksandar Matanovic (2495), Milan Vukic (2485), Drazen Marovic (2470), Milenko Sibarevic (2355), and two unrated chess talents: Garry Kasparov and Guillermo Garcia Gonzales. 16 year old Garry Kasparov went undefeated to make this his first all-GM tournament victory with a final score of 11.5/15, a full two points over second place. The final standings and crosstable are as follows:

    01 Kasparov 11.5/15 * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1

    02 Smejkal 9.5/15 ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1

    03 Andersson 9/15 ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½

    04 Petrosian 9/15 ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½

    05 Adorjan 8.5/15 ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1

    06 Knezevic 8/15 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1

    07 Matanovic 7.5/15 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½

    08 Browne 7.5/15 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ ½

    09 Bukic 7/15 0 1 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ * 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½

    10 Marjanovic 7/15 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 * ½ 1 0 1 ½ 1

    11 Marovic 6.5/15 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½

    12 Garcia Gonzales 6.5/15 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ * 1 0 ½ 1

    13 Vukic 6.5/15 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 * ½ ½ 1

    14 Kurajica 6/15 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ * ½ ½

    15 Hernandez 6/15 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½

    16 Sibarevic 4/15 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ *

    *One game decided by forfeit (Andersson's win over Bukic in the thirteenth round) is omitted from this collection.

    119 games, 1979

  6. Bishops & Knights Endings
    8 games, 1888-2005

  7. Converting Advantage Endings
    1 game, 1948

  8. Diff Color Bishops Ending
    1 game, 2004

  9. Exploiting Back Pawns
    1 game, 2003

  10. fianchetto
    1 game, 1894

  11. Instructive
    24 games, 1892-2016

  12. JAENISCH GAMBIT (SCHLIEMANN DEFENSE)
    The Schliemann Defence (ECO C63), 3...f5!?, is a very sharp line in which Black attempts to open the f-file for the attack, frequently sacrificing a pawn or two. Considered by many to be somewhat dubious, it has not been refuted and it is occasionally used in top-level play as a surprise weapon.

    This variation was originated by Carl Jaenisch in 1847 and is sometimes named after him. Although later named for German lawyer Adolf Karl Wilhelm Schliemann (1817–1872), the line Schliemann actually played in the 1860s was a variation of the Cordel Defence (3...Bc5 4.c3 f5).

    34 games, 1873-2002

  13. lasker annotates games
    41 games, 1907-1925

  14. Lasker's Secret Weapon
    A collection of games where Lasker plays f4-f5, leaving a backward pawn on e4. Some annotators comment rather dramatically on Lasker-Capablanca 1914 when Lasker makes this move. In reality, the idea was part of his repertoire nearly from the beginning.
    17 games, 1858-1934

  15. Open Ruy Lopez
    4 games, 1972-2005

  16. Open Spanish
    The main line of the Open Ruy Lopez. Black winning or drawing.
    9 games, 1914-2009

  17. Petite Combinations
    12 games, 1885-2005

  18. Positional Chess Handbook I
    Games from "Positional Chess Handbook (Israel Gelfer)" This inexpensive book contains many more examples and is worth getting.
    141 games, 1896-1986

  19. Positional Chess Handbook II
    Continuation of Positional Chess Handbook I
    186 games, 1857-1986

  20. Positional Planning
    7 games, 1887-1965

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