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Jeroen Piket vs Rudy C Douven
NED-ch (1988), Hilversum NED, rd 4, Jun-16
King's Indian Defense: Orthodox Variation. Classical System Neo-Classsical Line (E99)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Oct-21-15  Olsonist: I love Mondays.
Oct-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <41...Qg3+>
Oct-21-15  saturn2: After the first two obvious moves my choice was 43...Kf7 and the white king has no access to the 6th rank, so can get mated on the 4th and 5th rank by the rooks. And if white resacrifices the queen on g3 he is down a piece.
Oct-21-15  cocker: 43 ... Ne7 was the clever bit.
Oct-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: ♖♖♘ is all it takes to #
Oct-21-15  wooden nickel: Nice and slow: 41.Bxe2 Qg3+ 42.Bxg3 hxg3+ 43.Kg4,
then 43... Nh4 44.Kh3 Nf5+ 45.Kg4 Ne3+ 46.Kg5 Kg7 and mate in the move!


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Oct-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Bubo bubo: 41...Qg3+ opens the h-file and denies the king an escape via h2. After 42.Bxg3 hxg3+ 43.Kg4 Ne7!, White cannot prevent Rg6#.
Oct-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Picked the obvious <41...Qg3+!> for today's Wednesday puzzle solution.

After the forcing < 41.Bxe2 Qg3+ 42.Bxg3 hxg3+ 43.Kg4> I made the same follow-up move as <wooden nickel> with 43...Nh4 .

Running it through the computer with Deep Fritz 14, our try 43...Nh4 forces mate in four moves.

The game follow-up move <43...Ne7> is slightly more efficient, forcing mate-in-three after 43...Ne7 44.Rxf8+ Kxf8 45.Qxg3 Rg6#.

In looking for an improvement, I decided to look at the opening repertoire of Piket to see how he improved after losing this game.

Turns out this is the only game in which Piket played 13. Nb5 = Now 13. Nb5 = isn't a particularly bad move, but it gives Black too easy a path to equality.

Fritz prefers the improvements Piket later made in securing a draw with 13. Rc1 in Piket vs Kasparov, 1997 and in scoring a win with 13. b4 against this same opponent in Piket vs R Douven, 1989.

My own preference is Magnus Carlsen's current favorite 4. g3 as in Carlsen vs Gelfand, 2014.

Oct-21-15  Moszkowski012273: 43...Kf7 mates as well...
Oct-21-15  CHESSTTCAMPS: white has the bishop pair in a closed position where the bishops are behind the lines, with no offensive value. Black's majors are mobilized to break through against white's badly sheltered king. White owns a lot of worthless land on the queenside but has no real threats. The only opportunity to create an escape hatch for the white king is 42.g3 or g4, which loses to 42... hg+ 43.Kg2 gxf2+ 44.Kxf2 Rh2+ 45.Kf1 Qxg1+! 46.Kxg1 Rh1+ 47.Kg2/f2 R7h2#.

There is only one entry point available for black, and it works:

41... Qg3+! 42.Bxg3 hxg3+ 43.Kg4 Rh4+ 44.Kf5/g5 Kf7! 45.Rxf8+ Nxf8 46.any R7h5#

Oct-21-15  Monocle: The black side of the KID has to be the most telegraphed punch in the whole of chess. You can look at the position on move 40 and know exactly what the first 10 moves of the game were.
Oct-21-15  doubledrooks: 41...Qg3+ 42.Bxg3 hxg3+ 43.Kg4 Ne7 with the threat of Rg6# works for me.
Oct-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: 42....Qg3+ leaps off the page, so to speak, but it took me a while after that to see that White's defense consisted of running up the board on the light-squared diagonal (h3-f5). 43.Bxg3 hxg3+ 44.Kg4 and now 44....Ne7 cuts off the king's flight and clears the way for the rook.

This position reminded me of Averbakh vs Kotov, 1953. In both games a queen sacrifice brings the white king forward to contend with an array of attacking pieces, but the lack of a light-square bishop makes it challenging to finish His Majesty off.

Oct-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: The queen is sacrificed by black and the white king will be marched to the scaffold in quicktime.
Oct-21-15  Marmot PFL: Typical King's Indian combo. Seems that once black gets g3 in white usually loses.
Oct-21-15  Cheapo by the Dozen: It's obvious how this starts:

41 ... Qg3+
42 Bxg3 hxg3+
43 Kg4

At this point it's clear that Black will never get the checkmate without spending a tempo to involve some piece other than the rooks in hemming in White's king. To close off White's defenses, let's use the move order

43 ... Rh4+
44 Kg5 Kg7

The threat is now 45 ... R(7)h5#. And it turns out that none of White's tries, whether 46 Qxg3, 46 Rh1, or 46 Rf8 do anything to stop it.

Oct-21-15  Cheapo by the Dozen: Whoops. The game line IS better than my line, because if White slices his king toward the center, Black wants to play ... Kf7, at which point Rxf8+ is a check.
Oct-21-15  StevieB: Real nice combo there by black. Everything looked jammed up but he found a way to clear the decks for the final broadside. White's problem was he deployed his king in the front row of the defense, never a good idea.
Oct-21-15  Tiggler: This resembles a composed puzzle: black to mate in 5. That formulation would make it easier to find 45.. Ne7, which I did not see. Other moves force mate, but not so quickly.
Oct-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  gawain: Most stunning result from the queen moving into the heart of danger with ...Qg3 since Marshall's "gold coins" move in 1912?

S Levitsky vs Marshall, 1912

Oct-21-15  TimothyLucasJaeger: Well i didn't find the cleanest solution but it works...

41. ... Qg3+ 42. Bxg3 hxg3+ 43. Kg4 Rh4+ 44. Kf5

(44. Kg5 Kf7 is similar with fewer complications)

44. ... Kf7 45. Rxf8+

(45. Qxg3 Ne7+ 46. Kg5 Rh5#)

46. ... Nxf8 47. Qxg3 fxg3 and black is up a rook.

Oct-21-15  TimothyLucasJaeger: (After the final position white can stave off immediate mate with 48. f4)
Oct-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: The ending somehow resembles the variation Nakmura failed to find vs So at Singuefeld.
Oct-21-15  BOSTER: <Keypusher: leaps off the pages>. But White King was not invited to black party.
Maybe only time encouraged him to
come to 40. Kh3.
Other way the break is not very obvious.
Oct-21-15  The Kings Domain: Good, pretty complex game. It's nice how black piles up his forces to victory.
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