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Alexey Shirov vs Vladimir P Malaniuk
GMA World Cup Open (1989), Moscow URS, rd 9, May-??
Dutch Defense: General (A80)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Given 7 times; par: 74 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-23-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: 37.e4 is white's only try for an advantage. 37...dxe4 is a mistake. He should have played 37...fxe4, after which white does inded have a small advantage.

37...fxe4 38.♘xh5+ ♔g6 39.♘f4+ ♔h7 40.♕d1 ♗f7 41.♗xc6 (if 41.♕xg4 ♖g8 42.♕d1 ♕xh4 43.♘g2=)
41...bxc6 42.♖xc6 ♖xc6 43.♖xc6 ♕d7 44.♖a6 ♕b7 45.♖xd6±.

Is there anything better for white?

Sep-24-04  Knight13: <offramp: 37... fxe4> 37... fxe4? 38 Nxh5+ Bxh5 39. Wg5+ Kf7 40 Qxh5+ 1-0 Whites gets more advantage.
Sep-24-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: 37...fxe4 38.♘xh5+ ♔g6=. I won't repeat my previous post, but it looks level to me.
Sep-01-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: Played in the last round; both players needed a win. Shirov was critical of the weakening 14..h5? 15 Bh6 is an interesting pawn sacrifice to play on the weakened dark squares. After a lot of maneuvering influenced by time pressure Shirov went for the clever shot 37 e4!
Sep-01-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: There is a duplicate of this game in the database.
Feb-13-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexrawlings: Nice game. Would 39.. Nf3+ have been any better for Black?
Aug-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: Not. Even. Close. for the second straight day. If this is sound, it's a very impressive combination.
Aug-18-13  uniqueid: Beautiful play by Shirov. I saw that the pawn push is critical, but went for knight sacrifice 38.Nxe6, thinking Qxe6, 39. d5 Qe7 40. Qg5+ Kf7 41. dxc6, with the threat of Bc4+ looming , and then my brain reached the limits of its computing power. Shirov's knight is placed so beautifully, it doesnt have to move at all! So my planned sacrifice would have been disastrous.
Aug-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: Boy, did I ever go wrong on this one!

Or did I?

38. Nxh5+ Bxh5 39. Qg5+ Kf7 40. Qxh5+ Kf8 41. Bxc6 bxc6 42. Rxc6 Rd8 43. Rc7 Rd7 (43...Qf6 44. Rh7, followed by 45. Rcc7) 44. Rxd7+ Qxd7 45. Qh8+ Ke7 46. Qxb8, and I think black has had the proverbial weenie.

Only problem is, not all the moves are forced. But that's what I would have played.

Aug-18-13  watwinc: <Takya Kotov> After Ne6ch White seems to have enough
Aug-18-13  GrandMaesterPycelle: I went for Nxh5 too, thinking I could exchange everything but a pair of rooks and eat the pawns faster. Not even close.
Aug-18-13  morfishine: <38.d5> is the strongest move, but it hardly looks insane

38.d5 Na7 39.Nxh5+ Kf7 40.dxe6+ Qxe6 41.Qd4 Qg6 42.Rc7+ Rxc7 43.Rxc7+ Kg8 44.Bc4+ Kf8 45.Qh8+ Qg8 46.Qxg8#

*****
PM1: Typically, it took me exactly 1-move to not play the best defense

*****

Aug-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White is two pawns down.

White can recover the pawns with 38.Nxh5+ Bxh5 39.Qg5+ Kf7 40.Qxh5+ Kg7 (threatens Na7, trying to trade all rooks) 41.Bxc6 Rxc6 42.Rxc6 bxc6 43.Rxc6. However, after 43... e3 (43... Rxb3 44.Rc8 and the attack looks winning) 44.fxe3 Rxb3 (44... Qb7 45.d5 blocking the diagonal and if 45... Qxb3 then 46.Rc7+ Kf6 47.Qf7+ Ke5 48.Qxe6#) 45.Rc8 Rb1+ forces perpetual or the trade of rooks (if the white king captures the rook on b1, b2 or b3 then Qb7+ and Qxc8) after which the black queen can enter the white field.

A better option is 38.d5:

A) 38... Na7 39.Bxe8

A.1) 39... Rxc2 40.Nxh5+ Ke5 41.Rxc2 wins a bishop for a pawn (41... Q(R)xe8 42.Qc3+ Kxd5 43.Rd2# or 43.Nf4#).

A.2) 39... Qxe8 40.Qd4+ e5 (else drop the knight) 41.Nxh5+

A.2.a) 41... Qxh5 42.Qxa7 Rxc2 (42... Rd8 43.Rc7 looks very advantageous for White) 43.Rxc2 Qe8 44.Qxa5 with the better endgame. For example, 44... Rc8 45.Rc3 b6 46.Qb4 Ke7 47.Rc4 Rxc4 (else 48.Qc3) 48.Qxc4 followed by Qc6, b4, a5, h5, etc.

A.2.b) 41... Kg6 42.Qxa7 Kxh5 (42... b6 43.Qg7+ Kxh5 44.Qg5#) 43.Qxa5 looks similar to A.2.a.

A.3) 39... Rxe8 40.Rc7 followed by Nxh5 or Ne6 looks disastrous for Black.

B) 38... e5 39.Nxh5+

B.1) 39... Bxh5 40.Qg5+ Kf7 41.Qxh5+ and 42.dxc6 wins again a bishop for a pawn.

B.2) 39... Kg6 40.dxc6 bxc6 (40... Kxh5 41.cxb7 Rxc2 42.Bxe8+ Rxe8 (42... Qxe8 43.Qg5#) 43.Rc8 + -) 41.Bxc6 Bxc6 42.Rxc6 Rxc6 43.Rxc6

B.2.a) 43... Kxh5 44.Rc7 e3 (44... Qf6 45.Rh7+ and mate next) 45.Qxe3 f4 46.Rxe7 fxe3 47.Rxe5+ Kg6 48.Rxe3 with a won ending.

B.2.b) 43... Rxb3 44.Rxd6+ (44.Rc7 e3) 44... Qxd6 (44... Kxh5 45.Rh6#) 45.Qg5+ Kf7 46.Qg7+ Ke8 47.Qg8+ and 48.Qxb3 + -.

C) 38... exd5 39.Nxd5+ and 40.Nxe7, etc.

D) 38... e3 39.Qxe3 e5 40.Nxh5+ as in B.

E) 38... Ne5 39.Rxc8 Nf3+ 40.Kg2 Nxd2 (40... Rxc8 41.Qb2+ and 42.Rxc8) 41.Bxe8 Kg7 (41... Rxc8 42.Nxh5#) 42.Rxb8 with material advantage.

Aug-18-13  Chris1Clark: I was with al wazir but sadly simple things like 38...Kg3 somewhat make that a non plan. Otherwise I was at the same place.
Aug-18-13  DrAttitude: I vote for FischerRandom Chess. Genius's such as Grand Master Shirov will have unexplored positions in which to continue their creative genius. 38.d5 is awesome but the follow up is incredible. I was hurt to GM Shirov lose to 14 year old GM Wei Yi (Wei Yi vs Alexey Shirov World Cup 2013) Wei Yi vs Shirov, 2013 ; but what a game. Classical Chess still has life in GM chess.
Aug-18-13  DrAttitude: < agb2002: White is two pawns down.

White can recover the pawns with 38.Nxh5+ Bxh5 39.Qg5+ Kf7 40.Qxh5+ Kg7 (threatens Na7, trying to trade all rooks) 41.Bxc6 Rxc6 42.Rxc6 bxc6 43.Rxc6. However, after 43... e3 (43... Rxb3 44.Rc8 and the attack looks winning) 44.fxe3 Rxb3 (44... Qb7 45.d5 blocking the diagonal and if 45... Qxb3 then 46.Rc7+ Kf6 47.Qf7+ Ke5 48.Qxe6#) 45.Rc8 Rb1+ forces perpetual or the trade of rooks (if the white king captures the rook on b1, b2 or b3 then Qb7+ and Qxc8) after which the black queen can enter the white field.

A better option is 38.d5:

A) 38... Na7 39.Bxe8

A.1) 39... Rxc2 40.Nxh5+ Ke5 41.Rxc2 wins a bishop for a pawn (41... Q(R)xe8 42.Qc3+ Kxd5 43.Rd2# or 43.Nf4#).

A.2) 39... Qxe8 40.Qd4+ e5 (else drop the knight) 41.Nxh5+

A.2.a) 41... Qxh5 42.Qxa7 Rxc2 (42... Rd8 43.Rc7 looks very advantageous for White) 43.Rxc2 Qe8 44.Qxa5 with the better endgame. For example, 44... Rc8 45.Rc3 b6 46.Qb4 Ke7 47.Rc4 Rxc4 (else 48.Qc3) 48.Qxc4 followed by Qc6, b4, a5, h5, etc.

A.2.b) 41... Kg6 42.Qxa7 Kxh5 (42... b6 43.Qg7+ Kxh5 44.Qg5#) 43.Qxa5 looks similar to A.2.a.

A.3) 39... Rxe8 40.Rc7 followed by Nxh5 or Ne6 looks disastrous for Black.

B) 38... e5 39.Nxh5+

B.1) 39... Bxh5 40.Qg5+ Kf7 41.Qxh5+ and 42.dxc6 wins again a bishop for a pawn.

B.2) 39... Kg6 40.dxc6 bxc6 (40... Kxh5 41.cxb7 Rxc2 42.Bxe8+ Rxe8 (42... Qxe8 43.Qg5#) 43.Rc8 + -) 41.Bxc6 Bxc6 42.Rxc6 Rxc6 43.Rxc6

B.2.a) 43... Kxh5 44.Rc7 e3 (44... Qf6 45.Rh7+ and mate next) 45.Qxe3 f4 46.Rxe7 fxe3 47.Rxe5+ Kg6 48.Rxe3 with a won ending.

B.2.b) 43... Rxb3 44.Rxd6+ (44.Rc7 e3) 44... Qxd6 (44... Kxh5 45.Rh6#) 45.Qg5+ Kf7 46.Qg7+ Ke8 47.Qg8+ and 48.Qxb3 + -.

C) 38... exd5 39.Nxd5+ and 40.Nxe7, etc.

D) 38... e3 39.Qxe3 e5 40.Nxh5+ as in B.

E) 38... Ne5 39.Rxc8 Nf3+ 40.Kg2 Nxd2 (40... Rxc8 41.Qb2+ and 42.Rxc8) 41.Bxe8 Kg7 (41... Rxc8 42.Nxh5#) 42.Rxb8 with material advantage.> <agb2002> great post thanks!

Aug-18-13  patzer2: Well I got the first move 38. d5!! for today's Sunday puzzle, but only because I didn't anticipate the reply 38...Ne5 with the threat of a royal fork.

I'd like to think after 38. d5!! Ne5 I would have bravely played 39. Rxc8!, going in for the Queen sham sacrifice for a Rook, Bishop and passed pawn as in Shirov's brilliancy here. However, I might also have considered the simpler 39. Nxh5+, which wins with quite a bit more difficulty after 39...Kg6 40. Bxe8+ Rxe8 41. Nf4+ .

I calculated after 38. d5!! Black would reply 38...Na7 (not 38...exd5?? 39. Nd5 + dropping the Black Queen to a royal fork), when 39. Rxc8 Rxc8 40. Rxc8 Nxc8 (diagram below)


click for larger view

allows a winning double attack with 41. Qc3+, after which play might go 41...e5 42. Qxc8 exf4 43. Qxf8 .

However, a stronger winning move (than 41. Qc3+) here is the zwischenzug (i.e. in-between move) 41. dxe6! (diagram below)


click for larger view

threatening mate (e.g. 41...Na7?? 42. Qb2#) and leaving Black nothing better than 41...Qxe6 42. Nxe6 (giving up the Queen to delay mate) or 41...Kg7 42. Qc3+ (setting up the passed pawn to advance and win).

Aug-18-13  peterjam: I am not sure about Shirov's combination. After 39 Rc8, Nf3 immediately , how does white win? For example 40 Kg2,Nd2 41 R8c7,Qf8 42 Ne6, Qg8! 43 Nd8 Qd5 black is winning. If instead 42 de6, Qg8 43 Be8, Re8 44 Rd1 Nf3 45 Rf7 Qf7! black has a winning ending.
Aug-18-13  LIFE Master AJ: I went for 38.NxP/h5 ... not even close to Shirov's magnificent idea ..
Aug-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: This is the line I had major difficulty with.

38 d5 Ne5 39.Rxc8 Nf3+ 40.Kg2 Nxd2 41 Rxe8 Bxb5 42 axb5.


click for larger view

Black is up a queen and two pawns vs. two rooks, it's his move but he is absolutely losing.

White just has too many threats, such as dxe6 followed by Nd5+. If black plays 42...e5 to prevent that and the creation of a passed pawn for white, white simply plays 43 Ne6.


click for larger view

The threat is 44 Rc7, winning the queen and it does not look like black can stop it.

Aug-18-13  patzer2: <peterjam> After 39. Rc8 Nf3 (instead of 39...Rxc8 in the game), White looks to have enough for the win after 40. Kg2 Nxd2 41. Rxb8 Bxb5 42. axb5 (position below).


click for larger view

From here, Fritz 12 indicates play could go 42...e5 43. Ne6 Nxb3 44. Rc7 (diagram below).


click for larger view

Here, with the Black Queen trapped, White wins easy.

Aug-18-13  patzer2: <jimfromprovidence> Didn't mean to repeat so much of your analysis. I didn't see your post go up until after I responded to <peterjam>.

Anyway, it's clear the two Rooks, in this position (after 39...Nf3+), overwhelm the Black Queen.

Aug-18-13  James D Flynn: Black is 2pawns up but his K-side is seriously weakened by the pawn advqances. White can now immediately win a pawn by 38.Nxh5 + Bxh5 39.Qg5+ Kf7 40.Qxh5+( which also rmves a defender fron the N on c6 which is now thrice attacked and only twice defended.) Kf8 41.Bxc6 bxc6 41.Rxc6 Rxc6 42.Rxc6 Rxb3 43,Qh8+ Kf7 44.Rc7 Qxc7 45.Qh7+ Ke6 46.Qxc7 and White has Q and 5 against R and 5 pawns with an easily won endgame.
Aug-18-13  patzer2: <James D Flynn><...38.Nxh5 + Bxh5 39.Qg5+ Kf7 40.Qxh5+( which also rmves a defender fron the N on c6 which is now thrice attacked and only twice defended.) Kf8> Instead of 40...Kf8, it would seem 40...Kg7= holds. See <agb2002>'s post above.
Aug-18-13  waustad: I guess I went for the same red herring that so many others did by grabbing the rook pawn.
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