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Magnus Carlsen vs Arkadij Naiditsch
Dortmund Sparkassen (2009), Dortmund GER, rd 5, Jul-06
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense. l'Hermet Variation Berlin Wall Defense (C67)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 10 OF 10 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-06-09  chessic eric: Magnus is just clownin' now.
Jul-06-09  YouRang: This is not the first time Carlsen has won this way.

This is the sort of win that players earn by being tenacious and not settling for a draw just because it looks like the game is drawable. Good for Carlsen.

Jul-06-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessgames.com: Thanks to everybody for participating in our live chess broadcasts from Dortmund, Germany.

<PLEASE NOTE THAT TOMORROW IS A REST DAY!> The 2009 Sparkassen Chess-Meeting will continue at 9:00am (USA/Eastern) on Wednesday, July 8th. Hope to see you then!

Jul-06-09  chessic eric: with the prospect of <two> white queens coming, black resigns. 1-0, and Carlsen leads once again!
Jul-06-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: Will this game deter players from playing the Berlin against Magnus because of the result, or encourage them because of the clear draw Naiditsch missed?
Jul-06-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  eternaloptimist: <YouRang> I agree. Drawnik, for example, would have agreed to a draw a long time ago, but Carlsen HATES draws so he played on. Now he is reaping the benefits of that decision.
Jul-06-09  Ulhumbrus: <tamar: Will this game deter players from playing the Berlin against Magnus because of the result, or encourage them because of the clear draw Naiditsch missed?> Carlsen could have missed an earlier win following 20 e6! in which case it may deter them from playing the Berlin wall against Magnus.
Jul-06-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: <Ulhumbrus> Did Carlsen miss a win somewhere? I looked at 31 Rd5, but not closely.
Jul-06-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Good winning technique from Carlsen.
Jul-06-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <tamar: Will this game deter players from playing the Berlin against Magnus because of the result, or encourage them because of the <clear draw> Naiditsch missed?>

41. Kd6 certainly was a strange tactical oversight, but it was not that easy to see OTB that 41. Kd7 was a clear draw.

Naiditsch may have felt as a matter of positional judgment that White would have retained strong pressure in the position after 41. ... Kd7, or perhaps he believed he had to drop the g5-pawn any way in a line such as: 41...Kd7 42.Rd5+ Kc6 43.c4 Nd4 44.Rxe8 Rxe8 45.Rxg5, but this continuation actually would have been more than satisfactory for Black after 45. ... Re2, with the Black Rook ready to have a feast of pawns on the Q-side.

Jul-06-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: Nice. I glanced at this around move 29 and felt confident that Carlsen would win, not because of the position, but just because he is Carlsen.
Jul-06-09  Knight13: Pretty straightforward.
Jul-06-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: <Peligroso Patzer> As <Domdaniel> pointed out, right after the time control is a danger period for most players.

I suspect Naiditsch succumbed to what Krogius called the "retained image" On move 39 the King was on d6 and there was no danger.


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So Naiditsch may have felt he already had analysed the position, and so why waste time looking at it?

Jul-06-09  zanshin: <tamar: <Ulhumbrus> Did Carlsen miss a win somewhere? I looked at 31 Rd5, but not closely.>

Good instincts!


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[+0.75] d=20 31.Rd5 Rhe8 32.b3 Nf8 33.Nxc5 Kf6 34.Nce4 Bxe4 35.Nxe4 Kf7 36.Re5 Rad8 37.f5 g6 38.Ng5 Kf6 39.fxe6 Re7 40.Nf3 Rxe6 41.Rxe6 Nxe6 42.Nxh4 Nd4 43.Rf1 Kg5 44.Nf3 Nxf3 (0:08.36) 80818kN (Rybka 3)

Jul-06-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  kamalakanta: <chessgames.com: Thanks to everybody for participating in our live chess broadcasts from Dortmund, Germany.>

<PLEASE NOTE THAT TOMORROW IS A REST DAY!> <The 2009 Sparkassen Chess-Meeting will continue at 9:00am (USA/Eastern) on Wednesday, July 8th. Hope to see you then!>

Thanks for the great coverage!

Jul-06-09  Ulhumbrus: <tamar: <Ulhumbrus> Did Carlsen miss a win somewhere? I looked at 31 Rd5, but not closely.>

On 31 Rd5 one variation is 31...Rae8 32 Rxf5 Kxd7 33 Rf7+ Re7 34 Rxe7+ Nxe7 35 Ne6 Nf5. This is one variation after 31 Rd5 in which Black hangs on barely. In a number of others he loses.

I spoke in general terms. White's lead in development is considerable and if he opens lines , he may win. Carlsen did open lines, so he could have gained a won game at some point.

One alternative to 26 Rd5 is 26 Nxg6+ removing the bishop which defends the square e4, as I indicated in an earlier kibitz eg 26...Nxg6 27 Re4 Rad8 28 Rde1 Rd6 29 Rg4! Kf7 30 Re1-e4 and if 30..Rd1+ 31 Kh2 Rf1 32 Ng5+ and the e6 pawn falls.

Another alternative which I gave earlier, this time after 26 Rd5, is 28 Re1-d1 (instead of 28 Ng5) and then Nc6+.If the Black King goes to the King side, Rd8 begins a Queen side attack . However if the Black King goes to e8, Nf3-e5 threatens mate on d8 eg 28 Re1-d1 a5 29 Nc6+ Ke8 30 Nf3-e5 Rh6 31 Rd8+ Rxd8 32 Rxd8 mate

Jul-06-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: <Ulhumbrus> I'd be surprised if 26 Nxg6+ won. Black has so many defenses, surely one of them holds.

For example, 26...Rf8 using the square the knight just vacated has the advantage of protecting g6 and e6 when it comes to f6.

White can win back the pawn by piling on h4, but after ...Rd8 in a position like this,


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Even with the move, I don't think White can win against an active rook.

Jul-06-09  Ulhumbrus: <tamar> You could be right. It may be that after White piles on the h4 pawn, his main threat is, paradoxically, not to take the h pawn, but to play Ng5+
Jul-06-09  chessic eric: <tamar, Ulhumbrus: Did Carlsen miss a win somewhere?> 31.Rd5 looks to be better than the game continuation; earlier (p.2 i think) I thought 25.Rd5!?, intending Rg4, looked promising.
Jul-08-09  notyetagm: 51 ?


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51 ♘f5-e3


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Game Collection: First kill the counterplay, then the execution

51 ♘f5-e3 kills *all* of Black's <COUNTERPLAY> by defending the White c2-pawn chain base.

Now that Black has no <COUNTERPLAY> whatsoever against the White queenside pawns, Carlsen (White) just rolls his connected passers forward on the kingside, winning easily.

Very instructive play by Carlsen. Why have a race when you can play 51 ♘f5-e3 and leave your opponent without a shred of <COUNTERPLAY>?

Jul-08-09  notyetagm: 42 ?


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42 ♘f3xg5!


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Carlsen is the master of <PINS>.

Game Collection: PINS! PINS! PINS! PINS! PINS! PINS! PINS! PINS!

Jul-08-09  notyetagm: http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp...
Jul-08-09  levelzx: A question to all opening experts: does it make sense to play openings like Berlin Defense, when everything Black can hope for is hard fought, Rook-ending draw, because pawn structure ruins his chances in King and pawn endgames?
Jul-08-09  slomarko: It does make sense for example against players who aren't at their best in the endgames. However playing it against Carlsen, who seems to be love this kind of positions, doesn't seem to be a great idea. But even so Naiditsch was at least equal until he blundered heavily with 41...Kd6?
Aug-06-09  Ulhumbrus: <levelzx: A question to all opening experts: does it make sense to play openings like Berlin Defense, when everything Black can hope for is hard fought, Rook-ending draw, because pawn structure ruins his chances in King and pawn endgames?> The answer is yes, if Black risks losing otherwise. Kramnik gained the world title from Kasparov by employing this defence as Black. However White does enjoy a considerable lead in development and if he can make it count by opening lines, Black will have to try something else. According to Ivkov, Fischer has said that if the Marshall counter-gambit is sound, the Ruy Lopez has seen its days.
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