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Magnus Carlsen vs Fabiano Caruana
"Magnanimity" (game of the day Jan-26-2015)
Zurich Chess Challenge (2014), Zurich SUI, rd 4, Feb-02
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense (C65)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 12 OF 12 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-03-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: 31...Rd8 is no improvement over 31...Rc8, as <drleper> points out, because 32 Bg5 immediately would push it off that square, and the blockade with the Queen is hopeless.

31...Rd8 32 Bg5 Re8 33 Be7 b5 34 Qh4 Qf5 35 Qf6 Qd7 36 d5 Rb8 37 Qe6 Rb7


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2.90/24 White wins by walking to h7 and grabbing both pawns!

Feb-03-14  rahulthemoron: What is the problem with black going 36. Qxc4? Someone please explain to me.
Feb-03-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: 37 d7
Feb-03-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Hi rahulthemoron:

If 36...Qxc4


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You have a Rook defending the Black Queen.

Remember your basic Chess tactics.
Hit the defender.

Is there anyway we can annoy that c8 Rook?

Feb-03-14  SChesshevsky: <rahulthemoron: What is the problem with black going 36. Qxc4? Someone please explain to me.>

I think its 36. Qxc4 then ...d7 with double attack. If 37. Qxb3 then dxc8 with check and then axb3. If Rd8 or something White Qxc4.

That's why White went to b3. ...Qxc4 would be OK if they had a check on Whites King.

Feb-04-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Another instructive point using the c4 pawn as bait is here.


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Instead of 36.Qb3 the move 36.d5.


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If Black nicks the pawn 36...Qxc4? 37 Qxc4 Rxc4 38 d7.


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This time d7 promotes.

Always good fun spotting wee tricks in GM games.

Feb-04-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessguru1: Why 36.....Qxc4 will be a blunder for black.


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36.....Qxc4 37.d7 and the rook is lost. The rook is overloaded since it can not stop the promotion of the d pawn and support his queen at the same time.

Feb-04-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessguru1: <Sally Simpson: Another instructive point using the c4 pawn as bait is here.>

Tactically your variation is good but positionally, let's just say "it's limiting other white's options", since the option to move the pawn to c5 (as demonstrated in the game) to shatter black's king position will not be possible without the support of the other d pawn.

Feb-04-14  SChesshevsky: I was thinking 37...Qe4 might be a better defense. I don't believe White can allow the drop of the back pawn and let the Black queen behind on the file so maybe 38. d5 can be expected then ...Qe8 then ..Qd7 might be able to set up a blockade.

If 38.Be5 then maybe ...Qb7 holds.

Feb-04-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Hi Chessguru.

That fine. No problem.
I was just showing the other lad another wee trick based on the loose c4 pawn. Squeezing the position dry, wringing out the wee tricks that never get shown.

Feb-04-14  fgh: <another wee trick>

It's not a "trick", it's a tactical aspect of the position that is indispensable to winning.

Feb-04-14  Ulhumbrus: < jackpawn: Carlsen is beginning to remind me of Capa. Just as with Capa I will often see Carlsen's moves almost immediately, but then I reject them. It's almost annoying!> Capablanca said that Morphy's play was simple and straightforward. How about this. Morphy, Capablanca and Fischer did not just play simple and straightforward moves, they selected the right simple and straightforward move. Moreover they understood the reasons which made the right choice of simple and straightforward move right. Fischer has given an explanation when he says that in order to play pretty chess < You have to know a lot and be able to use it> So there you have it. He knows a lot and is able to use it and that is why he is able to make the right choice of simple and straightforward move.
Feb-04-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Hi FGH,

"It's not a "trick", it's a tactical aspect of the position that is indispensable to winning."

The lad asked for an explantion why Black could not take the c-pawn.

Someone clicked out 'd7' and nothing else which does not really explain anything does it.

After the answer to the orignal question was finally over-killed I gave my mate rahulthemoron another wee demo showing just how strong that d-pawn was. Hopefully he will have picked up something from this and his 'please explain' post can be turned into ideas for his future games.

So I fail to see how my 'wee trick' 36.d5 can be " a tactical aspect of the position that is indispensable to winning." because the move 36.d5 was not actually played in the game.

Jul-21-14  Chessman1504: This is a nice game. The way in which Carlsen wins seems far too easy, but that's the nature of his genius; he can make it look easy.
Jul-22-14  Chessman1504: It's also a nice game in that Caruana is a very strong calculator and a very concrete player. It marveled me how in a game against Morozevich in 2013 how he calculated a variation 14 moves deep with various sidelines and branches. I think they'll have interesting battles for the world championship in the future.
Jul-22-14  Chessman1504: I mean, all the top players are well-trained in the art of analysis and calculation, but I think Fabiano tends to be more concrete and rely on logic moreso than Carlsen with his more intuitive approach. I think Carlsen may be like Smyslov to Caruana's Botvinnik.
Jul-23-14  madlydeeply: Calsen prefers doubled pawns. he even undoubles his opponents (move 13). At move 41 Carlsen achieves his perfect beloved pawn structure.
Jul-23-14  madlydeeply: In fact, I daresay the purpose of his exchange sac is to achieve doubled center pawns.
Aug-05-14  Chessman1504: That is an interesting observation. I'm not sure he prefers doubled pawns, but it is true that he doesn't seem to mind doubled pawns. Already I can think of two games besides this one when he voluntarily allows the possibility for "ugly looking" doubled pawns.
Jan-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Two Car Collision!
Jan-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: Oh mate, it's been done and done better: Carlsen vs Caruana, 2014
Jan-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Okay then. How about "Magnanimity"?
Jan-26-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: Beautiful game. I recall this. Carlsen is able to play (like many of the great players) those "quiet" but beautiful so-called positional games a la say Karpov or Rubinstein (and Fischer also), but also in this manner when the attack is logical and beautiful. (Also Petrosian was a great "exchange sacrificer").

But more recently be lost a game where he either played more like a Tal (or he made an error it was hard to see), but it looked as though he had sacrificed for an attack or complications but his opponent defended well and won (I cant recall the players name).

So he seems to play comfortably, not only in his "Canal Attack" or "Maroczy Bind" style of games, but in a range of styles.

Occasionally a blunder as against Caruana in a game when he was playing the Berlin as black.

There may have been a defence here but if Caruana couldn't find it OTB Carlsen was on the right track for sure!

Jan-26-15  madlydeeply: Carlsen loves doubled pawns. Notice he allowed caruana to fix his pawn structure so only he could have the glory of the doublers
Jan-26-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: Point, <offramp>.
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