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Max Euwe vs Alexander Alekhine
Euwe - Alekhine World Championship Rematch (1937), Amsterdam NED , rd 21, Nov-25
Queen's Indian Defense: Riumin Variation (E16)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-15-06  McCool: Notes about this game:

6. ..♗e7 <was considered a new move at the time.>

17.♖e4 <a bad plan, according to Alekhine; 17.♖f4 was safe.>

18.f4? <perhaps the losing move; White's pawn storm will stall and his ♖/e4 is without space.>

21.h4 <21.♖xe6? ♘e5! is an interference move winning the Exchange.>

21. ..♕f7 <Alekhine's gun! tripled major pieces on a file.>

22. ..♔h8! <a quiet move, improving position before undertaking action.>

The game finishies with 33.gxh ♕f5+ 34.♔e1 ♖g1+ wins the ♕ueen. The final match score: 10-4-11.

Sep-20-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Alekhine uses a heavy piece assault along the f-file. White's forces looked disjointed and confused,to say the least. White could have resigned after the rook fell,as the game was hopeless.
Oct-29-07  PinnedPiece: What could have been the point of White's 24th move Rxe6?
Oct-29-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: "the point of White's 24th move Rxe6?"

This game was part of Euwe's collapse in this match. Why do kibitzer's never write "Euwe was on drugs" or such explanation? Only Alekhine's losses must be explained by substance abuse.

Alekhine was not too sharp either, missing the simple 25...d4 winning immediately.

Oct-30-07  pacelli: <Calli> Because Euwe had no vices. Because he was mere mortal. Because he's no genius like Alekhine. And of course to be a genius in any field incl chess, one must demonstrate grave private weaknesses to support the idea that all geniuses are petty or faulty or far-from-perfect human beings.
Oct-30-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: <pacelli> Thank you for the thoughtful reply. Wish that I believed in it, but CG kibitzers mostly just want to make a smart remark. They don't analyze the game and present no evidence for their allegation , see Game Collection: Alekhine was drunk! . Its just a desire to make a joke.
Oct-30-07  RookFile: Calli: Fritz 10 does prefer your 25.... d4, rating it at -2.33, but Alekhine's 25....Nc2 isn't bad at -1.81. Apparently, both moves win.
Apr-08-08  Knight13: What happens if White takes the e6 pawn before move 24?
Jul-24-09  M.D. Wilson: 25. d4 is simpler.
Aug-22-11  Ulhumbrus: 17 Re4 obstructs White's e pawn. This suggests 17 Rd1 instead.
Jan-04-12  King.Arthur.Brazil: I suppose that Wh need to attack and win at any cost, but he couldn't combine a Bl king attack with a e6 P attack. At 15.Qe3 he chose an fault plan, and Te4...went worst. Black explore the R bad position and win "easily"... Genius makes things simpler.
Jan-07-16  DWINS: I enjoy revisiting games whenever new chess software comes out to see if what we thought was correct in the past is not now. It often shows how unbelievably strong the great players are.

The consensus of the kibbitzers on this game, circa 2007-2009, suggest that Alekhine missed 25...d4. However, Stockfish 7 disagrees. It shows that the move he played, 25...Nc2! is significantly stronger than 25...d4. We just had to wait 79 years for computers to catch up! Here's Stockfish's analysis:

Stockfish 7 64 POPCNT -3.08 (depth 28) 25...Nc2 26.Qd2 Qxe6 27.cxd5 Qd6 28.Qxc2 Rxf4 29.Qd3 Rg4+ 30.Kf1 Rxf3+ 31.exf3 Rxh4 32.Qe3 Rh1+ 33.Ke2 Qg6 34.Kd2 Rh5 35.f4 Rh2+ 36.Ne2 h5 37.a3 Qb1 38.Qe5 Rh3 39.Ng3 Kh7

-2.25 (depth 28) 25...d4 26.Qe4 dxc3 27.Re7 Qg8 28.bxc3 Na6 29.Qe6 Qxe6 30.Rxe6 Kg8 31.Kg3 Kf7 32.Rfe3 Nc5 33.Rc6 Kg8 34.Rxc7 Rxf4 35.Rxa7 Ne4+ 36.Kh3 Nd6 37.Rc7 Nf5 38.Rf3 Rxh4+ 39.Kg2 g6

Feb-23-16  not not: "The consensus of the kibbitzers"

you meant: patzers armed with Rybka or Fritz?

Alechin (commenting once on Botvinik game with few winning options):

"many roads lead to Rome"

Feb-23-16  luftforlife: Strictly speaking, 21. . . . Qf7 does not create the battery famously known as "Alekhine's gun." That contiguous, single-color, three-piece formation consists of a queen backing two rooks down a single file; other concatenations or spaced alignments of heavy pieces do not suffice. The classic examples of this arrangement are Alekhine vs Nimzowitsch, 1930 (26. Qc1) and W Winter vs Alekhine, 1936 (24. . . . Qe8). Best to all. ~ lufty
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