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Alexander Huzman vs Alexey Dreev
URS-ch Young Masters (1987), Uzhgorod (Ukraine)
Queen's Gambit Declined: Barmen Variation (D37)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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sac: 26.Rxg6+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 5 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-27-08  zdigyigy: Not only blocking the sixth rank the bishop also covers f8, keeping the pin alive on the king. What a powerful analysis to make over the board, especially against Alexy Dreev.
Dec-27-08  MostlyAverageJoe: <MostlyAverageJoe:

1. (+0.64) 27. Rxf8 Kxf8 28. Rg3 Re6>

Update: 20 plies at the end of the above drops the eval to +0.54.

1A. (+0.54) 29. Rf3 Kg8 30. Qe4 Re8 31. Qf4 Qe7 ...

1B. (+0.53) 29. Qc1 Kg8 30. Rf3 Qe8 31. Qf1 Re7 ...

Dec-27-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: For today's Saturday puzzle solution, White's demolition combination with 26. Rxg6+!! initiates a decisive King side assault.
Dec-27-08  njchess: Like most, I got the first three moves for White. However, I then played Bd6 over Be5 because I wanted to follow up with Rg3 and I thought that Bd6 would prevent Black from playing Kf8 at some point (I was also worried that Qxe5 might secure a draw for Black). It wasn't until I played Bd6 that I realized my queen was protected from Rc6! Once Black seals off the f-file with Rf8, the rest is forced.
Dec-27-08  beginner64: Seems like a Thursday level to me. I got all the way till Bd6 (favoring it to Be5 to check flight square f8). Most of you have said somethings to this effect.
Jan-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  zenpharaohs: Stop me if I've told this one before...
Feb-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <Dec-27-08 Samagonka: It's not surprising how many got this right. It was a good Saturday puzzle. Not too difficult for the weekend.>

And so it is again!

Feb-03-18  Cheapo by the Dozen: I was also in the Be5 camp.
Feb-03-18  mel gibson: I didn't see the Monday puzzle yet
I saw this one straight away.
Feb-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: 37...Rf1+ 38. Kh2 R8f2! (not 38...R8f5 39. Qe8+ Kh7 40. Qh8+ Kg6 41. Qg7+ Kh5 42. g4+ Kh4 43. g3#).

Now what? If 39. Qe8+ (39. Qh8+ Kf7 40. Qg7+ Ke6) Kh7 40. Qh8+ Kg6 41. Qg7+ Kf5.

I don't see a mate coming any time soon.

Feb-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: Okay. The answer to my question is 37...Rf1+ 38. Kh2 R8f2 39. Qg6+ Kf8 40. Bd6#.
Feb-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has a bishop for a knight.

The white pieces aim at the black castle. This suggests 26.Rxg6+ hxg6 (26... Kh8 27.Be5+ and mate soon) 27.Qxg6+ Qg7 (27... Kh8 28.Be5+ and mate in two) 28.Qe6+:

A) 28... Rf7 29.Bd6 (29.Be5 Rc6 30.Bd6 Rxd6 31.Qxd6 Rxf3 - +) and the threat Rg3, winning the queen and two pawns for both rooks and keeping the attack, looks decisive. For example, 29... Rc6 30.Qe8+ Kh7 31.Rh3+ Kg6 32.Rg3+ Kh7 33.Rxg7+ Rxg7 34.Qh5+ Kg8 35.Be5.

B) 28... Kh8 29.Be5 wins decisive material.

C) 28... Kh7 29.Be5

C.1) 29... Rc6 30.Rh3+ Qh6 31.Rxh6#.

C.2) 29... Rxf3 30.Bxg7 Rxc3 31.Qh6+ Kg8 32.Qg6 looks winning. For example, 32... Rc1+ 33.Kf2 Rf8+ 34.Bf6#.

C.3) 29... Qg6 30.Rh3+ Qh6 31.Rxh6#.

D) 28... Qf7 29.Rxf7 Rxf7 30.Be5 + - [Q+B+2P vs 2r+n].

Feb-03-18  AlicesKnight: Saw the break-in but missed the effects arising from Bd6.....
Feb-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: Hmm. Interesting. 29. Bd6 is the key move, bringing us to here:


click for larger view

White threatens Rg3 pinning and winning the queen. That would give us an imbalance of two rooks versus a queen. That can favour the two rooks (if they can work together) or it can favour the queen (if the rooks are disconnected). Then white's extra two extra kingside pawns ought to settle the issue, although there are lots of adventures to come.

Instead of 29...Rc8, Fritzie recommends 29... Nd7 30. Rg3 Qxg3 31. Bxg3 Rc6


click for larger view

White ought to be able to pawn-grind this one, although the doubled rooks could be troublesome. The black knight might also get on the act if it can settle itself on a juicy white squared outpost that the bishop couldn't see.

I'd still favour white. Those extra passed pawns ought to be the clincher.

In human mode, I missed the strength of 29. Bd6, so decided to play for a safer smaller edge with 29. Be5. It's Fritzie's second choice, worth about 0.5 of a prawn compared wit 2.5 for the immediate 29. Rxg6+

Feb-03-18  Whitehat1963: Got the first six moves pretty easily. I’m proud of that, whether it was easy for a Saturday or not!
Feb-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Once> I forgot I analyzed today's Saturday puzzle over 9 years ago. Still, I managed to correctly visualize the first three moves of the combination with 26. Rxg6+! hxg6 27. Qxg6+ Qg7 28. Qe6+ Rf7 +-.

However, instead of playing the only winning follow-up 29. Be6! +-, I too deviated on my fourth move with the tempting 29. Be5? which allows Black the saving resource 29...Rc6! ∓.

After 29. Be5? Rc6! (diagram below),


click for larger view

it appears Fritz has miscalculated in giving White a half pawn advantage. According to Stockfish 8, White has no advantage whatsoever. Indeed, all the winning chances belong to Black after 29. Be5? Rc6! 30.Qe8+ Qf8 31.Rg3+ Kh7 32.Rg7+! Qxg7 33.Bxg7 Kxg7 34.Qe5+ Kh7 ∓ (-1.32 @ 36 ply, Stockfish 8).

Feb-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: "Whos is the Man,who didnīt drew !"
Feb-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <Patzer 2>, sorry I mistyped. Fritz's half prawn is for 26. Be5 (ie before the rook sac), not 29. Be5 (trying to keep the attack going after the rook sac).

I couldn't get the rook sac on g6 to work so I opted for a preparatory bishop move instead.

Feb-03-18  schachfuchs: Oh, as some others, I thought 29.Be5 is the end of today's puzzle, omitting Black's almost winning escape 29....Rc6 as well as the strong maneuver 29.Bd6!, 30.Be5 :-(
Feb-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Once> Thanks! I was starting to worry I wasted all the money I've spent on various versions of Fritz.

P.S.: Speaking of computer Chess programs, Black's decisive mistake according to Stockfish was 25...Rf8?, allowing today's Saturday puzzle solution 26. Rxg6+! +- (+3.71 @ 31 ply, Stockfish 8).

Instead, Black can preserve practical drawing chances with 25...Qc6 ± (+ 0.80 @ 39 ply), 25...Re6 ± (+0.99 @ 38 ply) or my pick 25...Qe6 ± (+1.03 @ 38 ply).

Earlier in this highly analyzed opening line, Black can probably improve over 18...exf3 19. Rxf3 ⩲ (+0.35 @ 31 ply, Stockfish 8) with 18...Nd5 = (+0.24 @ 38 ply, Stockfish 8) as in the drawn game K Grigoryan vs N Abasov, 2017.

Better yet, Black can accept a draw offer after 14. Rae1 = as in A Moiseenko vs E Alekseev, 2017.

Feb-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  gofer: This one looked way too easy for a <Saturday>, but its not the first three moves that are tricky. It's the fourth move.

<26 Rxg6 hxg6>
<27 Qxg6+ Qg7>
<28 Qe6+ Rf7>
<29 Bd6! ...>

The killer blow. Rf7 is pinned and Qg7 is stuck protecting the pinned rook, so the only pieces left to move are really Nb6 and Rc8. The whole reason to Bd6 (instead of Be5) is that the bishop can block any attack on the queen - via Rc6!

I can't see a good way forward for black. The black queen is lost, so in effect, we have swapped 2R for a Q, so not really that bad perhaps. But the issue is not that really. The issue is that black has lost two pawns as well and even worse those were the only pawns that were protecting the black king...

<30 Rg3> is coming...

~~~

Yep...

Feb-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: I saw that black wanted to play 29...Rc6 so I tried 29 d5 instead of 29 Bd6.


click for larger view

It surprisingly turns out that black can force a draw by repetition.

So the side puzzle is move 29, black to play and draw.

Feb-03-18  njchess: I got the game line of 26. ♖xg6+ hxg6 27. ♕xg6+ ♕g7 28. ♕e6+ ♖f7 easily enough. But then, I thought then what? White still has the same problem as before, less a rook for 2 pawns. 29. ♗e5 threatens Black's queen and frees up his rook to move to the g-file, but then I saw Black's counter of 29. ... ♖c6. Ugh.

It took me a bit to see that the otherwise awkward move of 29. ♗d6 foiled Black's counter of 29. ... ♖c6. After 29. ♗d6, Black actually has a tough time finding a decent move. 29. ... ♖f8 is probably his best option, but with 30. ♗e5, White is winning.

Feb-03-18  stst: Quite a subtle long game, still think the most direct attack is viable: 26.RxP+ PxR
27.QxP+ Qg7
28.Qe6+ Rf7
(if .....Kh8, 29.Be5 forks Q,K)
29.Be5 Qh7 (not much choice, Qg5 ==> QxR#) 30.Rg3+ (check better than harassing the Q with Rh3, for Qb1#) 31.Bd6+ Re7
32.Rf3+ Ke8
33.BxR (threatens Rf8#) QxB (forced)
34.Qg6+ Kd8 (if Kd7 35.Rf7 pins)
35.h3 to leave no chance of + by Black then Black runs out of moves... if Qe8 36.Qg7 Nd7
37Rf7 locks the position and Black either losses or giving up the Q...

see how it goes...

Feb-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: If 29 d5?!, black gains the tempo necessary to pull off a perpetual.

It begins with 29...Nd7 (black's only saving move) 30.Bd6 Nf8 31.Bxf8 Rxf8.


click for larger view

Here white plays 32 Rg3 and it appears that this wins the queen as black's rook on f7 is still pinned. But black has the resource 32...Kh8!


click for larger view

Now the rook is unpinned and now black threatens 33...Rf1#, making 33 Rxg7 impossible.

Now the only play is 33.Rh3+ Kg8 34.Rg3 Kh8, etc.

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