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N Evseev vs Salomon Flohr
"The Killing Flohr" (game of the day Jul-18-2014)
Moscow (Russia) (1949), Moscow URS
Caro-Kann Defense: Karpov. Modern Variation Kasparov Attack (B17)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 2 times; par: 28 [what's this?]

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sac: 22...Qd3 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-21-05  Whitehat1963: 21...Rc2! Great move!
Feb-25-05  samvega: Yeah, but I think the star move was 14..Ng4
May-25-06  aginis: from GM Flohr's annotations
<18.Kh5? after this 'attacking' move black recieves an unstoppable attack. However, even after 18.Qe2 black has compensation for the pawn in the form of development and two bishops. 18...Qc4! (not 18...Rfd8 19.f5) 19.Qf2 Qd3 threatening 20...Rc2 or 20.Rf2 Rfd8.>

<21.Qb3 Rh4 22.Be3 Rch8 23.Bg1 Bc5 24.Qg3 Qxb2 >

<22.Rg1 Qd1! 23.Ne4 Bxe4 24.Qxe4 Rxh2> (25.Kxh2 Qh5+ 26.Kg3 Bh4+ 27.Kh3(h2)Bf2#)

Aug-30-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Flohr finishes the game with the might tactical blows 21 ... ♖c2! and 22 ... ♕d3!, the latter move being a great example of <REMOVE THE GUARD>.
Aug-30-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: <21 ... ♕d3! REMOVE THE GUARD> Attack the defender (White g3-queen) with a piece not needed for the attack (Black d4-queen) from a square not in the defensive complex (d3-square) and attack something else (undefended White f1-rook) at the same time (<DOUBLE ATTACK>).
Oct-13-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  refutor: this is one of the nicest caro-kanns i've seen
Jul-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  eternaloptimist: The Killing Flohr
Jul-09-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  eternaloptimist: <refutor> I agree w/ u!
Jul-18-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  RookFile: Maybe 10. b3 would be OK for white. A problem with the earlier Ng3 is that Bf4 doesn't work well for white as the bishop cannot retreat to g3 if it needs to. By putting it on b2 I think white can get a reasonable game. The c3 move weakened white's d3 square and bishop.
Jul-18-14  Edeltalent: <I think the star move was 14..Ng4>

Surely a great move, but not so difficult to find if you know your ancestors (Rotlewi vs Rubinstein, 1907), which I'm sure Flohr did.

Jul-18-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: White's position looks like someone took a kann opener to it
Jul-18-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: This game does look a lot like Rubinstein's sacrifice with the ...Ng4 sacrifice (not to mention a move 22 queen sacrifice), the queen bishop barring down on the a8-h1 diagonal (also the final move being a rook move), etc.
Jul-18-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: The last three moves look like a dance step:24... ♖gh2+ 25 ♔g1 ♖g2# cha cha cha...
Jul-18-14  Conrad93: Hard Time Killing Flohr is a better pun.
Jul-18-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  eternaloptimist: <Edeltalent> There are quite a few similarities in this game & the Rubinstein game after ...♘g4 is played in both games especially on the d -> f-files pertaining to piece placements. <Penguincw> also made some valid points about similarities. Btw that is an ingenious game by Rubinstein & it's definitely 1 of the most brilliant victories of all time. <morfishine> That's a clever analogy that u came up w/! -- On the "floor" of the board (1st rank) at the end of this game, Evseev still had 2 pieces that were undeveloped on his ♕side & his ♔side ♖ had only moved once (after 8.0-0), did virtually nothing & never moved after that...the killing floor. If a chess player doesn't develop all of his/her pieces soon enough, quite often it will lead to defeat for that player. This is a great example.
Jul-18-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  eternaloptimist: <Conrad93> An analogy fitting for this pun & game is: Let's say this is a battle that took place in the Middle Ages. Evseev's army was in the "floor" of a valley & some of his army was cowering in fear & never joined the battle but hid instead (his undeveloped pieces on the chessboard). Flohr's army attacked from the surrounding hills to give them a great view of their opponents' position to detect weaknesses & to use cover to protect their archers & catapult operators. Flohr's army won the battle b/c of these things.
Jul-18-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  eternaloptimist: Something worthy of note is that my pun & the game submitted w/ it were picked for the game of the day for July 18th & Flohr died on July 18th back in 1983. He was truly a brilliant chessplayer & he greatly influenced my style of play.
Jul-18-14  ASchultz: It amuses me more than it should that this game is listed as the Kasparov attack and was played before it was born.

Oh, and guess I'm not the only one who thought of Rotlewi-Rubinstein here.

Jul-19-14  Conrad93: Openings are usually named after the players who popularize them.
Jul-19-14  Conrad93: <<Conrad93> An analogy fitting for this pun & game is: Let's say this is a battle that took place in the Middle Ages. Evseev's army was in the "floor" of a valley & some of his army was cowering in fear & never joined the battle but hid instead (his undeveloped pieces on the chessboard). Flohr's army attacked from the surrounding hills to give them a great view of their opponents' position to detect weaknesses & to use cover to protect their archers & catapult operators. Flohr's army won the battle b/c of these things.>

Good explanation.

Jul-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  eternaloptimist: <Conrad93> Thank u!
Oct-16-14  Notgudinov: Soltis gives this game in his book "Pawn Structure Chess" as being played in Odessa, not Moscow. Which is correct?
Feb-23-17  The Kings Domain: Neat attacking game by Flohr.
Feb-23-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: It is ironic really that such play arose from a 'stodgy' Caro-Kann, though less so that Flohr was its author; for he came up with some elegant attacking play early in his international career before tending towards a safety-first approach.
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