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Garry Kasparov vs Anatoly Karpov
Linares (1994), Linares ESP, rd 7, Mar-??
Caro-Kann Defense: Karpov. Smyslov Variation Main Line (B17)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-05-03  Shadout Mapes: Actually, the combination reminds me of Huzman vs Kasparov, 2003 !
Dec-05-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eggman: <Actually, the combination reminds me of Huzman vs Kasparov, 2003!>

It does????

Dec-05-03  OneBadDog: Everybody makes mistakes! When the wolds elite make mistakes, it often seems that it's for non-chess reasons, i.e., nerves, fatigue, etc..
Dec-05-03  Spitecheck: How's that <shadout> Huzman didn't miss it, or is just that Kasparov missed something which is rare.

Spitecheck

Dec-06-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eggman: Note that the Huzman combination was not all that rare. Not at all.
Dec-09-03  waddayaplay: I just found this site, by the way. In case you haven't read it: http://www.worldchessnetwork.com/En...

It is about GM-blunders!

Dec-09-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eggman: Very entertaining reading, waddayaplay. Thanks for that link!
Mar-07-04  WMD: If 13...Bxa3!? the line 14.Bxh6 Bxb2 15.Qxb2! Rxh6 16.Ngf3 was proposed. 'The black king is stuck in the centre and after White castles and plays Rfc1 he will have, in return for the pawn, a strong initiative and dangerous attacking chances on the open lines.'
Sep-21-04  PivotalAnorak: If I remember correctly, after 13... Bxa3, Karpov, in a later analysis (was that in New In Chess ?), gave 14. Bxh6 ! as satisfactory for Black.
Sep-21-04  PivotalAnorak: Ahem...
I mean satisfactory for White :-)
Jun-24-05  Everett: So all this hubbub about missed opportunities was actually seen by Karpov, or did was it pointed out after the match. Either way, seems that Karpov's 13th move may be no worse, or better than 13...Bxa3
Jun-24-05  WMD: I'm sure Karpov overlooked it. Incidentally, one factor in Karpov's favour in Linares 1994 was that he played his opponents (with the obvious exception of Kasparov) the round after they had encountered Kasparov.
Jun-24-05  Everett: <WMD: I'm sure Karpov overlooked it.>

Really?

<one factor in Karpov's favour in Linares 1994 was that he played his opponents (with the obvious exception of Kasparov) the round after they had encountered Kasparov.>

Interesting, but one can argue whether it's favorable or not. Any statistics on this matter?

Sep-12-05  coolthing76: <WMD> I think it's too much to say that the greatest achievment in tournament play was because "they played Karpov after Kasparov".
Sep-12-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  RookFile: I think this is much ado about nothing. Let's say Karpov actually plays 13...Bxa3. Does Kasparov resign? Hardly.

13... Bxa3 has a negative: it develops
white's rook 'for free'. Normally,
you have to move your own pieces to develop them, e.g. 1. Nf3. Not in this case: Karpov would be thoughtfully developing white's queen's rook for him. The a1 rook is now nicely placed on a1, pressuring a5.

No, you could expect Kasparov to dig in and view White's reasonble choices (Ngf3 or Bxh6), and come up with counterplay.

Sep-12-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: <If 13...Bxa3!? the line 14.Bxh6 Bxb2 15.Qxb2! Rxh6 16.Ngf3 was proposed. 'The black king is stuck in the centre and after White castles and plays Rfc1 he will have, in return for the pawn, a strong initiative and dangerous attacking chances on the open lines.'> <I'm sure Karpov overlooked it.>

Unless he admitted to it, I wouldn't be sure. Certainly makes sense to avoid such lines against Kasparov.

Going further, interesting line: 16..a4!? 17.0-0! axb3 18.Rxa8 Nxa8 19.Rc1 Qb8 20.Ng5 with lots of pressure for the piece.

Sep-12-05  Hesam7: <Going further, interesting line: 16..a4!? 17.0-0! axb3 18.Rxa8 Nxa8 19.Rc1 Qb8 20.Ng5 with lots of pressure for the piece.>

I am not sure, my feeling says to me that Black needs just two or three careful moves, then it will be over. In the final position after 20.Ng5, if Black manages to bring either the bishop (with c8-d7-c6-d5) or the a8 knight (via c7-d5) to d5 then IMO his position is won. Something else to note, the knight on e5 is pinned because of ... Qxh2+. These are just general thinking about the position there are no concrete calculations involved.

I will look into it more carefully in near future.

Sep-12-05  Hesam7: <acirce> It seems I have to eat my words :-). It is hard to play with Black After your line. Black is forced to give some material back. I gave the position after 20 Ng5 to Fruit - If you have a real fast computer analysis with a good engine is quite addictive :-) - This is the result:

21 ... Bd7 22 Ngxf7 Rh4 23 g3 Re4 24 Ng5 Qd6 25 Nxe4 Nxe4 26 Nxd7 Qxd7 27 Qxb3 Nd6 28 Re1 Nc7 29 d5 Kf7 30 dxe6 Nxe6 31 Qf3 Kg6 32 Qd5 Nc7 33 Qd4 (eval: +0.41)

Depth: 19
3000M nodes
725K nodes/sec

Oct-15-05  Everett: After all this hullabaloo, it seems Karpov's choice in the game on move 13 is not only more to his taste, but also superior. 13...a4 gains space and 14...Bd7 exchanges off a lousy minor piece. Black equalizes, later wins a pawn, was never in danger, pressures white's IQP, and is held to a draw. Not a comfortable game for white.
Mar-17-06  who: <wmd> <Incidentally, one factor in Karpov's favour in Linares 1994 was that he played his opponents (with the obvious exception of Kasparov) the round after they had encountered Kasparov.>

There needs to be one more exception at least. If Karpov didn't play Kasparov in the first round then whoever he played in the first round he played before Kasparov and if he did then the same reasoning applies to the second round (unless people had a bye).

Mar-27-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: <talchess2003: Karpov is a good grandmaster in positional chess and opening theory, but he will always be a novice to tactics....>

This statement is so divorced from reality that it is astonishing someone would actually put such a ridiculous thought to text.

See Karpov vs Topalov, 1994 (3 rook sacrifices!) and Karpov vs Sax, 1983 for starters, two Chess Informant Best Game Prize winners that reveal Karpov's profound tactical mastery.

Just because Karpov did not play like Tal did not mean that he couldn't. Karpov chose not make insane, crazy complications that could go either way since he was the greatest technician in the history of the game and could convert even the smallest advantages into full points. So why take unncessary risks?

Mar-27-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jim Bartle: <talchess2003: Karpov is a good grandmaster in positional chess and opening theory, but he will always be a novice to tactics....>

Karpov-Hort 1971
Karpov-Spassky 1974 (game 9)
Karpov-Korchnoi 1974 (game 2)
Karpov-Velimirovic 1976
Tatai-Karpov 1977
Karpov-Korchnoi 1978 (8)
Timman-Karpov 1979 (Montreal)
Karpov-Hubner 1980

And that's just a few through 1980 that I found among Informant's best games in about five minutes.

Feb-09-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <talchess2003: Karpov is a good grandmaster in positional chess and opening theory, but he will always be a novice to tactics....>

Had <talchess> bothered to review other games from Linares, he might have noticed Karpov vs Topalov, 1994.

Feb-09-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <WMD: I'm sure Karpov overlooked it....>

Another <shach matov>; this poster knows better than these great players what their very thoughts are....

<.....Incidentally, one factor in Karpov's favour in Linares 1994 was that he played his opponents (with the obvious exception of Kasparov) the round after they had encountered Kasparov.>

For this gem, the <Weapon of Mass Destruction> cannot even claim originality, as <Eric Schiller> attempted to explain away Karpov's success thus in his book on Kasparov.

Feb-09-14  RedShield: <<WMD: I'm sure Karpov overlooked it....>>

In <Kasparov vs Karpov 1988-2009>, Garry notes:

<13...a4?! The fruit of nearly half an hour's thought. 'Ivanchuk, who was playing close by, immediately saw with his "peripheral vision" the incredible resource 13...Bxa3!?. This spectacular stroke made such a strong impression on the journalists, that many of them reported that "already in the opening Karpov missed an opportunity to the win the game". But when a few hours later the reply 14.Bxh6! had been thoroughly studied, it transpired that its consequences were altogether unclear.' (Makarychev)

[...]

Curiously, at the board I altogether overlooked 13...Bxa3. It would appear that Karpov also did not notice it. When immediately after the game we were shown it by Ljubojevic, for both of us it was a revelation. This amazing mutual oversight, like our other mistakes, is a clear indication of the colossal nervous tension that accompanied this game.>

<For this gem, the <Weapon of Mass Destruction> cannot even claim originality, as <Eric Schiller> attempted to explain away Karpov's success thus in his book on Kasparov.>

In a <New In Chess> interview with Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam, immediately after his victory in Linares in 1994, Karpov said: <I was looking at the list and immediately saw the good news that I would get Kasparov's opponents one round later. This is good, because he gives them a hard time (laughs). And then the next day I play against them. Of course, Shirov was in the best position in this tournament. He met players who had just played Kasparov and me. Actually he proved how good this position was.>

I don't know who this <WMD> cat was, but I'd like to think that wherever he is now, he's feeling a measure of vindication. It seems he was one of the legendary posters from the early years of this site - Ray Keene once joked that he had a PhD in chess.

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Kasparov on Kasparov: Part I
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