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Ian Rogers vs Alexey Shirov
Groningen (1990), Groningen NED, rd 1, Dec-21
Sicilian Defense: Boleslavsky Variation (B59)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-09-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Might be a sign: No sense for danger, today.
May-09-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  gofer: Ahhh the sweet of success! What a nice way to finish the week!
May-09-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  johnlspouge: Sunday (Insane)

I Rogers vs Shirov, 1990 (62...?)

Black to play and win.

Material: Down 2P for R. Black has a passed Ph2. If Ph2 and the White Rh5 are simply removed from the board, the resulting K+P endgame is drawn, e.g., Ke4xf4 Pf7-f5. The position is delicate, however:

62…Kg1 [or Kg2] 63.Kxf4 h1=Q 64.Rxh1 Kxh1

65.Kg3! [other moves draw]

65…Kg1 [advancing Pf7 does not help]

66.f4 Kf1 67.Kf3 Ke1 68.f5 Kd2 69.Ke4 Kc3 70.Kd5 Kd3 71.f6

Now, having locked Ps, White captures Pf7 and wins. There are many variants, but Black cannot prevent White’s basic plan of locking Ps and capturing Pf7, while keeping the Black K too far away to help.

Candidates (62...): f5+

If White plays 63.Kxf5, Black draws. I missed the obvious capture that <dzechiel> describes, however: 63.Kxf4 is a simple win.

I agree with many others: nice post, David.

The above describes the winning plan after the game finish, in any case.

May-09-10  SamAtoms1980: I suspected that after 62 ... Kg3! White would be in zugzwang.

No, I am NOT saying that I could take Shirov in a mini-match.

May-09-10  A Karpov Fan: missed. waaaaaaaaaay off lol
May-09-10  RandomVisitor: After 57.Ra5!


click for larger view

Rybka 3: <21-ply>

+M23 57...Kxf3 58.Rg5

+M17 57...Kg3 58.Rg5+

+M17 57...Kxh3 58.Rg5

+M17 57...Kh2 58.Rg5

+M16 57...f6 58.Ke6

May-09-10  JohnBoy: <Random>: I would personally like a bit more detail about how 57.Ra5 Kxf3 58.Rg5 works. Saying Rybka3 gives M23 does not help me a whole lot. It's the detail of corralling the pawns and avoiding stalemate (if 57...Kxh3 instead) that interests me.
May-09-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Today's Sunday puzzle solution is 62...Kg3!, a move missed in the actual contest, which forces a draw in this difficult endgame.

I got the move quickly enough, but was under the delusion that Black was winning, having missed White's drawing finesse (the difficult part), pointed out by <dzechiel>.

May-09-10  rapidcitychess: Sunday

Insane

62...?
Canidates: f5+, Kg3, Kg2

A 62...f5+
A1 63.Rxf5? h1=Q =-
A2 63.Kxf5 Kxf3 64.Rxh2 and it seems it is a draw.
A3 63.Kxf4! With a obvious win.(for white)
B 62...Kg3 A trebuchet in a rook endgame!?
B1 63.Rg5+? Kh4 and a queen is in the making.
B2 63.Kd3 since a rook vs pawn endgame could soon arise, it seems logical. B2a 63...Kg2 just gets checked.
B2b 63...Kxf3 64 Rxh2 Kg3 65 Kd5!drawing
B2c 63...h1=Q 64.Rxh1 Kg2 65.Rh5 seems to win for white. Well, I can't see that far, But I am sure that it is a draw or more.

May-09-10  rapidcitychess: Yes!! Got it! 7/7! Good morning, and happy mother's day! *dances*
May-09-10  RandomVisitor: <JohnBoy>After 57.Ra4:

A) 57...Kh3 58.Rg5 Kh2 59.Rg4 h3 60.Kd6 Kh1 61.Ke5 h2 62.Kxf4 f5 63.Rh4 Kg2 64.Kxf5 1-0

B) 57...Kxf3

In general, the white rook will go after the h4 pawn and then sacrifice for the advancing black pawn on f1. The white king will go after the f7 pawn. The black king cannot stop the white h-pawn from promoting. Here are some possible playouts:

58.Rg5

1. 58...Ke3 59.Ke7 f3 60.Kxf7 f2 61.Rf5 Ke2 62.Kg6 f1Q 63.Rxf1 Kxf1 64.Kg5 Kf2 65.Kxh4 1-0

2. 58...Ke2 59.Rg4

a. 59...f3 60.Re4+ Kd2 61.Rxh4 Ke3 62.Ra4 f2 63.Ra1 Ke2 64.Ke7 f1Q 65.Rxf1 Kxf1 66.Kxf7

b. 59...Ke3 or 59...Kf3 60.Rxh4

3. 58...Ke4 59.Ke7 f3 60.Kf6! Ke3 61.Rf5 Kf2 62.Kg5 Kg3 63.Rxf7 f2 64.Rxf2 Kxf2 65.Kxh4

In all cases, black is just 1 move short of making any plan work.

May-09-10  muralman: Geeeez I hate it when the player takes a different route. I was sure I missed it when I moved to Kg3, and forward from there. As soon as I saw Shirov take the King to Kg2, I walked away to find a more ego satisfying task.
May-09-10  RandomVisitor: <JohnBoy>I meant 57.Ra5! in my above posting.
May-09-10  jul059: Isn't this game supposed to go 61. Rh5 Kg2 62. Kxf4 h1Q 63. Rxh1 Kxh1 64. Kg3 1-0?

I think there is an error in the database. My references are : Dvoretsky's endgame Manual 2nd edition and chessbase.

May-09-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  doubledrooks: Black loses with 62...Kg2. But 62...Kg3! holds the draw.

Now if white plays a waiting move with the rook (such as 63. Rh7) then black follows with 63...f5+ 64. Kxf5 Kxf3 65. Rxh2 Kg3. The white king has gone past the black f pawn, and white is forced to give up the rook for the pawn.

May-09-10  wals: Nalimov Endgame Tablebases

Black
Kh1-g1 lose in 19
f7-f6 lose in 18
f7-f5 lose in 17

May-09-10  wals: Rybka 3 1-cpu: 3071mb hash: depth 19:

Black
Rook for 2 pawns, Knight for Bishop.
+2.66 32...Kh8. better Ng4, -0.78.
White
Up 1 pawn. Bishop for Knight.
+1.74 34.Qf4. better Rxf5, +2.66.
+1.11 36.Rb3.better Rxf5, +1.70.
Black
down a pawn
+3.01 48...Ra8. better Re3, +0.80.
+3.70 49...h4. better Re8, +3.01.
White
Up 1 pawn
+4.76 51.Kc4. increase by Rybka.
Black
material even
+6.04 55...Ra3. better Kh2,+4.95.
White
A Rook for a pawn
=0.00 57.Kd6. better Ra5, +5.12.
Black
Two pawns for a Rook
+5.12 Kg2. better Kg3, =0.00.

May-09-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: Black has two pawns for a rook.

White threatens 63.Rxh2+ and 63.Kxf4 followed by Kg4 and f4-5-6 and the subsequent attack against the black pawn while blocking the black king.

The natural 62... Kg2 63.Kxf4 h1=Q 64.Rxh1 Kxh1 loses to 65.Kg3:

A) 65... Kg1 66.f4

A.1) 66... Kf1 67.f5

A.1.a) 67... Ke2 68.Kf4 Kd3 (68... f6 69.Ke4 Kf2 70.Kd5 Kf3 71.Ke6 Kf4 72.Kxf6 + -) 69.Ke5 Ke3 (69... Kc4 70.Kf6 Kd4 71.Kxf7 Ke5 72.f6 + -) 70.f6 Kf3 71.Kd6 Kf4 72.Ke7 Kf5 73.Kxf7 + -.

A.1.b) 67... f6 68.Kg4 Kf2 69.Kh5 Kf3 70.Kg6 Kf4 71.Kxf6 + -.

A.2) 66... f5 67.Kh4 Kg2 68.Kg5 Kf3 69.Kxf5 + -.

A.3) 66... f6 67.f5 is similar to A.1.b.

B) 65... f5 66.f4 transposes to A.2.

C) 65... f6 66.f4

C.1) 66... f5 67.Kh4 transposes to A.2.

C.2) 66... Kg1 67.f5 transposes to A.3.

Therefore, 62... Kg3, protecting both pawns:

A) 63.Rh8 f5+ 64.Kxf5 (64.Ke5 Kxf3) Kxf3 65.Rxh2 (otherwise 65... Kg2) Kg3 followed by 66... f3, drawing.

B) 63.Rxh2 Kxh2 (63... f5+ 64.Kxf5 Kxh2 65.Kxf4 + -) 64.Kxf4 Kg2

B.1) 65.Kg4 f5+ 66.Kf4 Kf2 =.

B.2) 65.Ke3 Kg3 66.Ke4 (66.f4 Kg4 67.Ke4 f6 =) f5+ 67.Ke3 Kg2 (67... f4+ 68.Ke4 + -) 68.Kf4 (68.f4 Kg4 - +) Kf2 =.

B.3) 65.Ke4 f5+ 66.Kf4 (66.Ke3 Kg3 67.f4 Kg4 - +) Kf2 =.

C) 63.Ke(f)5 Kxf3 64.Rxh2 Kg3 followed by 65... f3 =.

May-09-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  DarthStapler: I didn't get it
May-09-10  WhiteRook48: i had 62...f5+ 63 Kxf5 Kg2 64 Kxf4 h1=Q, figuring that black would lose anyway
May-09-10  TheBish: I Rogers vs Shirov, 1990

Black to play (62...?) "Insane"

Time to get crazy! It seems like Black should draw, but it's not so easy: 62...Kg2 63. Kxf4 h1=Q 64. Rxh1 Kxh1 65. Kg3! (keeping the Black king "down"!) Kg1 (advancing the pawn doesn't help, i.e. 65...f5 66. f4! Kg1 67. Kh4 Kg2 68. Kg5 and wins, or 65...f6 66. f4 Kg1 67. f5 Kf1 68. Kg4 Kf2 69. Kh5 Kf3 70. Kg6 and wins) 66. f4! Kf1 67. f5! (but not 67. Kf3? f5! and draws) Ke2 68. Kf4 Kd3 (or 68...f6 69. Ke4 wins) 69. Ke5 Ke3 70. f6 Kf3 71. Kd6 Kf4 72. Ke7 and wins. Time for another try...

62...Kg3!

This holds on to the f4 pawn, at least temporarily. Now 63. Rg5+ Kf2 64. Rh5 just repeats, so the rook must stay on the h-file while the White king tries to guard his f3 pawn.

63. Rh8 f5+!

Driving the king away.

64. Kxf5 Kxf3 65. Rxh2 Kg3

Or course not 65...Ke3? 66. Rh3+ f3 67. Kg4.

66. Rc2 (other moves are no better) f3 67. Ke4 f2 and the draw is obvious, as the rook will have to give its life to prevent a queen from being born!

Time to see how this ended.

May-09-10  TheBish: Well, I could have guessed Shirov would miss this (hence the "Insane" rating). He's a great attacker, but he needs to brush up on his endgame skills! Of course, this WAS 20 years ago.
May-09-10  LIFE Master AJ: Must be one of the easiest Sundays for me ever. I worked out all the best lines in about 15 minutes, with no major problems.
May-17-18  Toribio3: I love this game. Defeating heavy weights like GM Shirov is a great honor. Viva Ian Rogers!
May-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <heavy weights like GM Shirov>

No need to get personal.

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