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Vladimir Kramnik vs Peter Leko
"Marshalling his Forces" (game of the day May-07-12)
Kramnik - Leko World Championship Match (2004)  ·  Spanish Game: Marshall Attack. Modern Main Line (C89)  ·  0-1
To move:
Last move:

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Given 41 times; par: 38 [what's this?]

Annotations by Raymond Keene.      [406 more games annotated by Keene]

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sac: 28...Nxc3 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 34 OF 34 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-26-07  Cactus: <Marmot> are you serious? I couldn't quite tell...
Nov-27-07  The Rocket: Leko crushed Kramnik which very rarely happens(Kramnik had not lost a single game to Kasparov in his first WCM), Kramniks queens sac was obviously not sound and cost him the game, also very rare to see risky play form the normally solid and careful Kramnik.
Dec-18-07  alexrawlings: Why does black not take the rook off with 18. Bxe4?
Aug-23-08  myschkin: . . .

In a frank talk with <Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam> ("New in Chess" magazine) Kramnik shares his views on the crucial moments in the match, short draws (‘There should be more respect for the players’) and his ideas ...

http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail...

(dunno if it has been posted before; if so pardon me)

Mar-17-09  pom nasayao: i don't think Black's 15. . g5 is sound.
Jul-12-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Kinghunt: <pom nasayao: i don't think Black's 15. . g5 is sound.>

I think it's quite sound. It's been played in a number of games and has given black some remarkable wins. You may want to look at the follow, amongst others:

Shirov vs Aronian, 2006
Korchnoi vs J Silver, 1977
A Shomoev vs Grischuk, 2008
M Vachier-Lagrave vs Svidler, 2009
Smirin vs Grischuk, 2001

Sep-22-11  Ghuzultyy: What a great game
Dec-07-11  rilkefan: Stockfish finds and evaluates ...Qd3 as <-3 in 20 s on my laptop. It settles on the ...Nxc3 line in half a minute. The world has changed a lot since '05.

Incidentally sf thinks 22.Ne4 Bxe4 23.fxe4 Bxe4 is, in contradiction to the annotation, good for white (+0.9) in view of 24.ab ab 25.Ra7 Re7 26.Rxe7 Bxe7 and 27.Bc2 or Qe2 or Kg2 (depth of 32, 10 Gnodes).

Mar-25-12  JoergWalter: I think this game rehabilitated 16....Qh5.
one earlier game that put 16....Qh5 into the dubious category was this one:

http://www.365chess.com/view_game.p...

May-07-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Did you see this final note to the game?

<At the end of the game Kramnik said, sportingly: "a beautiful game that will be remembered in the history of chess.">

Yeah, right.
That's what I say whenever I lose.

May-07-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  King Sacrificer: I just read the previous kibitzing (the ones posted when the game was being played) and enjoyed the game just like watching it live.

This game was a great psychological struggle. Leko was in time trouble and Kramnik kept playing quickly until he faced 25. Qd3, the winning move by Leko.

May-07-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: It looked like white had the passed pawn that couldn't be stopped. Leko was able to stop Kramnik however.
May-07-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  sfm: Great GOTD.
May-07-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: Without a doubt, this game marks the competitive apex of Leko's career. This was the high point of his rising tide; his career only ebbed from here on.
May-07-12  5leafclover: What would be wrong with 29. Ng1? Defends mate on e2 and I don't see any other deadly threats.
May-07-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  20MovesAhead: 5leafclover

if 29.Ng1, Ne4 with 30...Bb4,check to follow

May-07-12  erniecohen: <<rilkefan>Incidentally sf thinks 22.Ne4 Bxe4 23.fxe4 Bxe4 is, in contradiction to the annotation, good for white (+0.9) in view of 24.ab ab 25.Ra7 Re7 26.Rxe7 Bxe7 and 27.Bc2 or Qe2 or Kg2 (depth of 32, 10 Gnodes).>

Apparently, neither Stockfish nor Keene noticed that after 24...Bd3, 25. Bxf7+ fails to 25...Qxf7 26. Qxd3 Re1+ 27. Kg2 Qd5+ with a winning attack. White has nothing better than a likely draw after 25. Qf2 Re2 26. Qxf7+ Qxf7 27. Bxf7+ Kxf7 28. bxa6 Bxa6 29. Rxa6 Re1+ 30. Kg2 Rxc1 31. Rxc6.

Sep-19-12  Conrad93: So what exactly happened to Leko?
Sep-19-12  Conrad93: The annotation for this game is very Keene.
Feb-20-13  camembert: Keene's notes are an embarrassment. I wish somebody would remove them.
Apr-10-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  DrGridlock: Keene’s language seeks to be definitive (sometimes haughty?), while his annotations are in actuality sloppy. This produces an rhetorical style, which one might label “Keenesian.”

After 22 axb5 Keen writes, “Starting on the road to perdition. White must play 22 Ne4 Nxe4 23 fxe4 when 23 ... Bxe4 24 axb5 axb5 (24 ... Bd3 fails to 25 Bxf7+) 25 Bxg5 is in White's favour. In this line Black must play 22 Ne4 Bxe4 23 fxe4 Nxe4 with approximate equality.”

Road to perdition? Perdition (noun) 1. a state of final spiritual ruin; loss of the soul; damnation. 2. the future state of the wicked. 3. hell ( def 1 ) . 4. utter destruction or ruin. So this sounds bad for White, right? Not only does he lose the game with axb5, but also his soul.

At this point, Komodo finds (depth=24):

Vladimir Kramnik - Peter Leko


click for larger view

1. ˛ (0.46): 22.Ne4 Nxe4 23.fxe4 Bxe4 24.Bxg5 bxa4 25.Bc4 Bd5 26.Bxd5 cxd5 27.Qf6 Qxf6 28.Bxf6 a3 29.bxa3 Re3 30.a4 Rxc3 31.Rf1 Rc6 32.Rf5 Ba3 33.Kg2 Bb2 34.Kf3 Bc3 35.Kg4 Re6 36.Kg5 Bd2+ 37.Kh5 Kf8

2. ˛ (0.37): 22.Qd1 g4 23.axb5 axb5 24.Nf1 Bb8 25.f4 Be4 26.Ne3 Bf3 27.Qf1 h5 28.Bd1 Be4 29.Qf2 h4 30.gxh4 Bf3 31.f5 Qh5 32.Bc2 Ne4 33.Bxe4 Bxe4 34.b3 f6 35.Bb2

3. ˛ (0.27): 22.axb5 Bd3 23.Qd1 Be2 24.Qe1 Bd3 25.Qf2 axb5 26.Ne4 Bxe4 27.fxe4 Nxe4 28.Qf3 g4 29.Qe3 Nf6 30.Qd2 Ne4 31.Qh6 Qf5 32.Be3 Bf8 33.Qf4 Qg6 34.Rf1 Nd6 35.Qf2 Bg7 36.Bc2 Ne4 37.Qf5 Qxf5

OK, so Ne4 is better, but at an evaluation difference of .46 versus .27, I’d hardly say that axb5 is White’s “utter destruction.” However, Keene doesn’t even find the right Ne4 line. Keene states, “Black must play 22 Ne4 Bxe4 23 fxe4 Nxe4 with approximate equality.” Must he? Turning again to Komodo:

Vladimir Kramnik - Peter Leko


click for larger view

1. ˛ (0.43): 22...Nxe4 23.fxe4 Bxe4 24.Bxg5 bxa4 25.Bc4 Bd5 26.Bxd5 cxd5 27.Qf6 a3 28.bxa3 Rc8 29.Rf1 Bxa3 30.Bd2 Qxf6 31.Rxf6 Bb2 32.Rxa6 Bxc3 33.Bxc3 Rxc3 34.Ra5 Rc2 35.Rxd5 Kg7 36.Rf5 Rd2 37.d5 Kg6 38.g4

2. ˛ (0.54): 22...Bxe4 23.fxe4 Nxe4 24.axb5 axb5 25.Ra7 Re7 26.Rxe7 Bxe7 27.Qd3 g4 28.Be3 Nd6 29.Bc2 Qxd3 30.Bxd3 f5 31.Bf4 Kg7 32.Kf2 Kf6 33.Ke2 Ke6 34.Bc2 Kd5 35.Kd3 Bf6 36.b3 c5 37.dxc5 Kxc5

Turns out that 22 … Nxe4 is better for black than 22 … Bxe4 (the move that Black “must” play).

Apr-10-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  DrGridlock: Kramnik’s opening (computer) preparation just went awry in this game. Kramnik stated, “It was a brilliant game from Peter’s side, because over the board it was not easy to find all these moves in such a sharp position, but from my side it was stupidity. It was clearly a hole in my preparation, but it was a very strange hole. We analysed this whole line and then some hours before the game we found this idea with 18...Nf6 and 21...Qg6. We briefly checked 22.Ne4, okay White is slightly better, but Black can hold. Then somehow we got this idea of 22.ab5, but there was very little time to check it. We looked at 22.ab5, did some analysis, it seems that White is better.

Fritz co-programmer Mathias Feist stated, “Leko found it over the board, so it seems. Kramnik relied on his preparation and didn't really work during the game. I think he may have seen the problem over the board, too, if he also would have worked. Of course there's another possibility: they analysed and saw it, but Kramnik forgot he had to play Qd1 instead of the line actually played. The nice idea with the queen sacrifice was glued to the brain together with a tag that the line is okay, the dreary ordinary stuff was overridden.”

At move 23, Komodo finds:

Vladimir Kramnik - Peter Leko


click for larger view

1. ˛ (0.27): 23.Qd1 Be2 24.Qe1 Bd3 25.Ne4 Nxe4 26.bxa6 Nf6 27.Qf2 Ra8 28.a7 h6 29.c4 Bc7 30.c5 Qf5 31.Ra3 Kg7 32.Be3 Qc8 33.Qd2 Qf5 34.Qd1 Qg6 35.Ba4

2. µ (-1.09): 23.Bc2 Bxc2 24.bxa6 Bd3 25.Qd1 Be2 26.Qe1 Bxf3 27.Qxe8+ Nxe8 28.Nxf3 Nc7 29.a7 g4 30.Nd2 Qd3 31.Nf1 Na8 32.Bg5 Qe2 33.Bd2 Qb5 34.Bc1 Qf5 35.Ne3 Qf3

3. (-1.61): 23.Qf2 Re2 24.bxa6 Rxf2 25.Kxf2 Qh6 26.Nf1 Qh3 27.Bxg5 Bxf1 28.Rxf1 Qxh2+ 29.Ke3 Qxb2 30.a7 Qxc3+ 31.Kf2 Qb2+ 32.Kg1 Qxd4+ 33.Kg2 Qxa7 34.Bxf6 Bxg3 35.Kxg3 Qb8+ 36.Kf2 Qxb3 37.Re1 h5 38.Re5 Qb6+

After 22 axb5, White is OK (not headed down the “road to perdition.”) However, in this line after 22 … Bd3 he needs to play 23 Qd1 instead of 23 Qf2. Indeed, Qf2 was the road which damned his soul in this game.

Apr-10-14  Rhialto: <So this sounds bad for White, right? Not only does he lose the game with axb5, but also his soul.

At this point, Komodo finds (depth=24):

[...]

3. ˛ (0.27): 22.axb5 Bd3 23.Qd1 Be2 24.Qe1 Bd3 25.Qf2 axb5 26.Ne4 Bxe4 27.fxe4 Nxe4 28.Qf3 g4 29.Qe3 Nf6 30.Qd2 Ne4 31.Qh6 Qf5 32.Be3 Bf8 33.Qf4 Qg6 34.Rf1 Nd6 35.Qf2 Bg7 36.Bc2 Ne4 37.Qf5 Qxf5

OK, so Ne4 is better, but at an evaluation difference of .46 versus .27, I’d hardly say that axb5 is White’s “utter destruction.”>

But .27 is obviously a completely wrong evaluation, because in this line 25...Re2 transposes to the game and Black is much better. A more important question is whether 23.Qd1 draws; in this line Komodo only transposes to the game by way of trying to avoid repetition for White.

Apr-10-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  DrGridlock: <A more important question is whether 23.Qd1 draws; in this line Komodo only transposes to the game by way of trying to avoid repetition for White.>

In Modern Chess Openings, Vol 1, John Watson writes after 23 Qf2? "Falling for an insidious trap. 23 Qd1 Be2! Qc2 Bd3 Qd1 draws." There is at least a draw by repition (and no worse) for White here. I do not yet know if White can play for anything more after 22 Qd1 Be2.

Clearly, as you point out, it cannot be with the Qf2 line, since black's response Re2 transposes back to the game.

Apr-10-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  DrGridlock: Komodo finds that after 23 Kd1, White can play on (rather than accept a draw by repetition of moves) with:


click for larger view

1. = (0.08): 23.Qd1 Be2 24.Qe1 Bd3 25.Ne4 Nxe4 26.bxa6 Nf6 27.Qf2 h6 28.a7 Ra8 29.c4 Qf5 30.Be3 Qd7 31.Qd2 Qf5 32.Qd1 g4 33.c5 Bc7 34.f4 Be4 35.Bf2 Bf3 36.Bc2 Be4 37.Bxe4 Qxe4 38.Qe1 Qc2

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