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Daniel Grigoryevich Fridman vs Bojan Kurajica
III Open Bajada de la Virgen (2005), Bajada de la Virgen ESP, rd 5, Jun-16
English Opening: Agincourt Defense (A13)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <al wazir> <After 18...Bxd5 19. exd5 Nxg3 20. hxg3 (20. Qb2 O-O-O) e5, what does white have?> White has 21. Nxe5! with a winning position.

Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <patzer2>: What do you (or Fritz) say to 21...Nxe5 22. Qxe5 Qf6 ? White is a ♙ up, but I don't see the win. If 23. Qc7 then 23...b5 24. d6 (24. Bb3 Bd6) bxc4 25. dxe7 Qxe7 26. Rd7 Qf3 27. Qb7 (or 27. Rfd1) O-O.
Jun-24-06  Fezzik: Boy, I missed this one. I tried numerous sacs, including 18.Nd5, but just didn't see anything concrete. I completely missed 19.Qb2!!

In a real game, I would agonize over this position knowing that there has to be something here for White, but I probably would still miss the key move.

Thanks CG.com for bringing me down to earth after a relatively easy week of puzzles.

Jun-24-06  The17thPawn: Got move eighteen for white and black but wasn't even close to Qb2! That's two days in a row now that a queen move has totally baffled me. <al wazir> in you're line after Qf6 I think White just plays 23.Rf1-e1 and an exchange of queens does not relieve blacks problems after 23....QxQ 24. RxQ,Kf8 or d8 or d7 don't work for black in any variation I've examined. Black may have to keep queens on in this position though that seems counter intuitive for breaking an attack. If black doesn't keep queens on I think he has to step out of the pin or he's in deep. Could you share a few of you're variations? Because, I think black is toast in this line.
Jun-24-06  EmperorAtahualpa: 18.Nd5 was my guess, so at least I have the first move correct. But I only worked out some variations after 18...exd5, and didn't take 18...Nxg3 19.Qb2!! into account at all.

Great puzzle and a great game!

Jun-24-06  dakgootje: Now, it has been some time ago since i missed a puzzle this much! Didnt consider the move, the idea and it took some time after i saw the solution why black wasnt simply winning

Great puzzle and already waiting for tomorrow's as that one will probably be quite unsolvable for most of us ;-)

Jun-24-06  EmperorAtahualpa: Spectacular finish too!

if 33...Bxf8, then 34.Re8+ Kc7 35.Ne6+! winning the queen.

Jun-24-06  Tariqov: I, like most did not consider Qb2!! oh well,still nice to find Nd5!:)
Jun-24-06  monad: <CG> There ought to be a <graduation ceremony> for those brilliant few amongst us who managed to solve all puzzles this week, with titles attached. Honorary CG Life Master maybe?

I reckoned this was a 2-pipe problem today. As I don't smoke, I made it a 2-coffee problem instead. No luck. What a game these two played. All this week's solutions may have been unattainable, but no less delightful for that. Thanks.

Jun-24-06  awfulhangover: Boy, this was a tough one. Is rally black's response to 18. Nd5 the best?
Jun-24-06  kennel46: Anyone? I missed yesterday's problem. How do you go back to those before?
Jun-24-06  RandomVisitor: <awfulhangover>Here is a study of Black's top 3 moves after 18.Nd5: 1: D2 Fridman - B Kurajica, III Open Bajada de la Virgen 2005


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 2.0 Beta 4 mp:

1. (0.94): 18...Nxg3 19.Qb2 Bxd5 20.Qxh8+ Bf8 21.exd5 Nxf1 22.dxe6 fxe6 23.Bxe6 Qxe6 24.Re1 Qxe1 25.Nxe1

2. (1.08): 18...exd5 19.exd5 Nxg3 20.hxg3 Ba4 21.d6 0-0 22.dxe7 Rfe8 23.Rfe1 Qf6 24.Rc1 Nb6 25.Ne5

3. (1.28): 18...Bxd5 19.exd5 Nxg3 20.hxg3 e5 21.Nxe5 Nxe5 22.Qxe5 Qf6 23.Rfe1 Qxe5 24.Rxe5 Kf8 25.d6

(, 24.06.2006)

Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <alwazir> After <18...Bxd5 19. exd5 Nxg3 20. hxg3 (20. Qb2 O-O-O) e5 21. Nxe5 22. Qxe5 Qf6 23. Qc7 > (diagram below), White wins with 24. d6! but 24. Bxb5+ is also winning per Fritz 8.

D2 Fridman - B Kurajica


click for larger view

[White to move (24?) and win.]

Analysis by Fritz 8 (@ 17 depth):

1. (5.44): 24.d6 Bd8 25.Bxf7+ Kf8 26.Qb7 Rh7 27.Qxa8 Rxf7 28.Qxa6 Qf5 29.g4 Qe5 30.Qc8 Qf6

2. (2.41): 24.Bxb5+ axb5 25.d6 Kf8 26.dxe7+ Qxe7 27.Qc3 Kg8 28.Rfe1 Qa7 29.Qf6

Jun-24-06  RandomVisitor: <patzer2><Random Visitor> After <19...Bxd5 20.Qxh8+ Bf8 21.exd5 Nxf1 22.dxe6 fxe6>, Fritz 8 indicates it's close to a win for White after either 23. Ne5 (+1.81 @ 14 depth) or 23. Qg8 (+1.72 @ 14 depth). Does Rybka see these two as an improvement over <23. Bxe6> in this line? Answer: 23.Ne5 Nxe5 24.Qxe5 Rd8 25.Rxf1 0.66/16 or 23.Qg8 O-O-O 24.Bxe6 Bd6 25.Bxd7+ Kxd7 26.Ne5+ Kc8 27.Qe6+ Kc7 white needs the hard-to-find 28.g3 for 1.61/17

Also, in Rybka's second line and the game continuation, it would seem after <19...exd5 20.Qxh8+ Nf8 21.exd5 Nxf1 22.dxc6 Ne3 23. cxb7 Rb8> that 24. Qe5! Rxb7 25. fxe3 (+3.09 @ 14 depth, Fritz 8) is decisive. Does Rybka have a defense for 24. Qe5! here? Answer: 24.Qe5 Rxb7 25.fxe3 Rd7 26.Rf1 2.01/19 Black is no worse off than in the game at move 26.

Black loses in all continuations, but all it takes is one unexpected line to force a draw. There does not appear to be a drawing line in today's puzzle.

Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <RandomVisitor> Thanks for the second look with Rybka. Today's (Saturday) problem (18.?) was so hard that even the computers had some initial difficulty finding a winning line.
Jun-24-06  filipecea: Ouch!! High and Hot as Hell !
Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <al wazir> In generating the Fritz 8 response, just noticed I didn't address your speicific line of analysis.

After <18...Bxd5 19. exd5 Nxg3 20. hxg3 (20. Qb2 O-O-O) e5 21. Nxe5 22. Qxe5 Qf6 23. Qc7 b5 24. d6 (24. Bb3 Bd6) bxc4 25. dxe7 Qxe7>, White has a winning pin with 26. Re1 (either Rook).

Jun-24-06  LIFE Master AJ: I got scrubbed by this problem, I had several candidate moves, and Nd5 was definitely one of them. However, I eventually chose 18.Rxd7. Its cute, and there are couple of nasy traps, but ...

Fritz confirms that 18.Nd5!! is the strongest. I still do not grasp all the points of this combo, probably to map it out completely, I would have to annotate the game.

Jun-24-06  Fezzik: In reply to kennel46,

"Where can I see an archive of previous daily puzzles? This feature is available to Premium Chessgames members. For more information on upgrading your account, see our Premium Membership page. "

That's the official version. You can also take a look at what comments by the regular contributors, click their names to see what games they've commented on recently and check the games out that way. I hope CG.com doesn't mind my mentioning that possibility.

Jun-24-06  TrueBlue: key here was to see potential attack on king. White queen and black king are both on e. So e6 could lead to mate if black is not careful. Otherwise, typical Sunday puzzle (I know it is Saturday). 20 moves for a pawn :(
Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I was clueless in this one,must be the weekend again,lol.

Boy does the pieces (and fur) fly in this one!

Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <The17thPawn>, <patzer2>: Thanks. You've refuted my line. I guess I'm just sore because I never considered 18. Nd5.
Jun-24-06  aginis: but what about 18...exd5
Jun-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <aginis> <what about 18...exd5> It loses to 19. exd5, as validated by Fritz 8 and Rybka. See the discusion above between <RanbdomVisitor> and myself.
Jun-25-06  LIFE Master AJ: BTW, Nd5 is a very thematic type of sac that opens lines for White.

Two books to read that cover the Nd5 leap, (in some detail): # 1.) "Pawn Structure Chess" by Andrew Soltis.
# 2.) "Sacrifices in The Sicilian," by Leonid Shamkovich.

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