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Georgy Lisitsin vs Viacheslav Ragozin
Leningrad, 1934 (1934)
French Defense: Two Knights Variation (C00)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 27 times; par: 42 [what's this?]

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sac: 20.Bh7+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-22-07  4i4mitko: so now i see that in the second line Black can avoid the mate by playing 5... Re8
Jul-22-07  Knight13: This one's HARD!
Jul-22-07  zev22407: If 20)N-g5 f5! 21)Q-h5 h6xg5 22)h4xg5 and now black has 22)..N-d5! and black has the advantage on 23)B-c4 N(c)-e7 or 23)R-f4 Nxf4 24)g3xf4 N-e7 The only winning move is 20)B-h7+ and white has that importent Tempo.
Jul-22-07  zanshin: I didn't get this one, but I think it's an excellent example of a Sunday puzzle. The attack combination is not obvious, yet the difficulty is not made "artificially" difficult by forcing us to see too many moves. Good choice by CG.
Jul-22-07  turritopsis: it's an entirely moot point, but in the line 20.Ng5 hxg5, i prefer the rather prettier continuation 21.Rxf7 to the immediate Qh5 that some have suggested. after 21.Qh5, black can still play 21...f5 and come out on top. after Rxf7, 21...Kxf7 is impossible because mate is forced: 22.Qh5 Kg8 (22...Kf6 23. Rf1#) 23.Qh7+ Kf7 24.Rf1+ Qf6 and now 25.Bg6# gives a lovely mate, with all the remaining white pieces working together to trap the black king. if black does not take the rook, his position is crippled, all of white's attacking threats remain, and i see very few moves to prevent Qh5 on the next turn.
Jul-22-07  bakuazer: i saw an attack immediately, like Ng5 or Bh7, but since this is sunday puzzle, i thought it is probably too hard, so i immediately checked the solution, and i am surprised a bit. I should have thought longer.
[i wasn't too interested, bc stupidly i have missed wednesday puzzle this week, so i wdn't have gotten 7/7 anyway :) ]
Jul-22-07  tarek1: This is an incredible combination : White sacrifies TWO pieces in a row and yet can allow himself TWO quiet moves in the middle of the attack, and Black is helpless. All he can do is give the queen to avoid immediate mate.

Others have posted similar analyses but not in this exact form and same comments, so I'll do it. What i saw :

1.Bh7+ Kxh7
2.Ng5+ hxg5
3.Qh5+ Kg8
4.Qxf7+ Kh7
5.Qh5+ Kg8
6.hxg5!! (the quiet move. Two ideas : open the h-file for the rook AND play g6 to complete the black kings prison with g6)


click for larger view

Now,

A. 6...Bc8 7.g6 Qxd4+ 8.Kh2 and there is no defense against Qh7#

B. 6...Ne7 with the idea of responding to g6 by Nxg6. 7.Kf2!! Second quiet move.
This is where the other idea of hxg5 comes into play. There is no defence against Rh1 Nh6 Rxh6#

C 6...Nd5 to defend h7 with Nf6
7.g6 Nf6
8.Rxf6!THIRD sacrifice ! gxf6 or Qxf6
9.Qh7#
Alternatively, the Kf2 idea works too here.

I don't see any other reasonable, not grossly losing moves for Black after hxg5.

Black isn't forced to accept either sacrifice, but the acceptance is the only critical line here because otherwise White gets a so overwhelming position that a piece is a very cheap price for it.

Jul-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: A common theme-with a new wrinkle: BxP+ KxB N-N5+ wins horray!!!
Jul-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: In the final position, White has a quick mate after 25...Rg8


click for larger view

with 26. Qh5!, when play might continue 26...Rg7 27. Qxh6+ Rh7 28. Qxh7#

Jul-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: White solves today's extremely difficult puzzle with the surprise sacrifice 20. Bh7+!! This h7 demolition of pawn cover sacrifice initiates a double piece offer to demolishes the Black King's pawn cover, despite the fact that the initial move doesn't capture a pawn.

If 20. hxg5,


click for larger view

White wins after 22. Qh5+ Kg8 23. Qxf7+ Kh8 24. Qh5+ Kg8 25. hxg5,


click for larger view

when play might continue
25...Ne7 26. Bxe7 Qxe7 27. g6 Qf6 28. Rxf6 gxf6 29. Qh7+ Kf8 30. Qf7#

Jul-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: Excellent analysis by <patzer2>, including, for example, the observation that in the variation with 21. ... hxg5 (in lieu of the game's 21. ... ♔g8) after 21...hxg5 22.♕h5+ ♔g8 23.♕xf7+ ♔h7 24.♕h5+ ♔g8 25.hxg5 ♘e7, the simplest win is by means of 26. ♗xe7. The suggestion of another kibitzer (26. ♔f2) exposes the White King and loses against several Black moves, including 26. ... ♖f8+ and 26. ... ♗c6.
Jul-22-07  Zzyw: First time I got the sunday puzzle. The position of the white pieces immediately brings to mind the idea of ♗h7+ followed up by ♘g5+, and the variations are relatively easy as white has very forcing, simple moves and black is without defensive resources. f7 is weak, should we get a knight there we'll gain an important tempo on the queen which hasn't got any good squares. The bishop on a3 also takes away much of black's posibilities by covering e7 and f8. Black must have had an attack of chessblindness to play 19...♖e8??, because he's really asking for it. What was he thinking? White's a pawn down, has a terrible structure and his only hope to make something of the game is an attack on the king. So 20.♗h7+ could hardly have been a surprise, the position begs for it.

The variations:

1.♗h7+ ♔xh7(A) 2.♘g5+ ♔g8(B) 3.♘xf7 ♕~ 4.♘xh6+ ♔h7(C) 5.♕h5

A) 1...♔h8 2.♘g5 hxg5 3.♕h5

B) 2...hxg5 3-5.♕h5xf7-h5+ ♔g8 6.hxg5

C) 4...gxh6 5.♕g4+

Jul-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  fm avari viraf: The first thing that came to my mind was 20.Ng5 but Black is not obliged to grab it & can play either 20...f6 or f5. Hence, 20.Bh7+ forcing Black to grab it 20...Kxh7 & now 21.Ng5+ is the right order of move, if... hxg5 Black cannot survive for long & so 21...Kg8 not ...Kh8 because of the fork on f7. After 22.Nxf7 Black's Queen has to run for her life leaving the Black King in shambles. The rest is all tactics & techniques to complete the goal.
Jul-22-07  willyfly: In a heartbeat I saw
20 ♗h7+ ♔xh7 21 ♘g5+ hxg5 22. ♕h5+ ♔g8 23. ♕xf7+ ♔h7 24 ♕h5+ ♔g8 25. hxg5

this seemed really easy for a Sunday so this can't be right - look and see now

---
not too bad - got the first two moves (the obvious ones) - having seen the continuation this still seemed somewhat easy for a Sunday puzzle - a lot of forced moves

Jul-22-07  tarek1: <Peligroso Patzer>
< The suggestion of another kibitzer (26. Kf2) exposes the White King and loses against several Black moves, including 26. ... Rf8+ and 26. ... Bc6.> Actually, the exact variation involving Ne7 is not the immediate Kf2, but Kf2 after Qf7+ Kh7 Kf2!! This is what I had in mind but forgot it in the writing.

The position is now


click for larger view

So the B Line I posted is actually :

B. 6...Ne7 with the idea of responding to g6 by Nxg6. 7.Qf7+ Kh7 8.Kf2!! Second quiet move. This is where the other idea of hxg5 comes into play. There is no defence against Rh1 Nh6 Rxh6#.

Patzer2 suggestion works too.

Jul-22-07  TopaLove: <dzechiel>This technique of pretending you didnt see the solution before posting your analysis is really interesting.
Jul-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  dzechiel: <TopaLove: <dzechiel>This technique of pretending you didnt see the solution before posting your analysis is really interesting.>

Hi, TopaLove,

Thanks, I think. If you were to check on my past posts you would see there are abundant times in which I posted analysis that not only failed to follow the game, but was, in fact, totally losing.

I'm not proud of my failures, but I do enjoy my successes. My "technique" is to open a copy of Notepad in a window next to the diagram and write down my thoughts as I examine the position. Twice I have set up the position on my chess table to give me a better look. I do edit my musings as I see new moves and such, but I don't change the text after clicking to see the solution.

Trust me, if I was "pretending" to not peek at the answers I would have a much better success rate. My name is David Zechiel, which you can see on my profile page (I have nothing to hide).

Jul-22-07  Fezzik: I took about thirty seconds, saw the combination that was played, then looked to see what the refutation was.

I guess I got lucky because I've just had a very long weekend (7 games at game/2hrs in a closed tournament) and didn't feel at all like working at solving. So, is there a refutation?

Jul-22-07  Fezzik: BTW: I was with turretopsis (interesting name, btw) on Rxf7 for White after hxNg5. I don't know if I was right, it was just what I saw.
Jul-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gilmoy: <dzechiel: ... Notepad ... chess table ...> Emacs and WinBoard (without engine).
Jul-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  dzechiel: <Gilmoy Emacs and WinBoard (without engine).>

*IF* I was going to use a professional editor for this work, I would use CodeWright in Brief emulation mode.

Having used many, many editors over the years (and I'm talking editors like TECO, edlin [yuk], PE2, Brief, vi, Emacs, Slick, etc), I have settled on CodeWright as having the best features.

Jul-23-07  resty: got the first two moves
Oct-16-07  srinivas6195: EASY ONE
Oct-05-17  Whitehat1963: Wow!! Slaughter!
Mar-28-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: Brilliant attack. In the final position, Black is up two pieces yet totally helpless against White's forces.
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