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Carl D Latino vs Steven R Dumas
North American Open (2010)  ·  Trompowsky Attack: General (A45)  ·  1-0
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sac: 3.e3 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jan-30-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: I submitted this game, the only known game in this line that White <won> after playing 3.e3?? Compare Z Djordjevic vs M Kovacevic, 1984.
Jan-30-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Obviously Black should have won easily with his extra piece: 12...Qd8 or 12...Qe7, followed in the latter case by ...d6, ...g6, and ...Bg7, would have been a safer place for his queen; instead of 15...f6??, 15...Qf6! would have saved his queen, retaining a dead-won position.
Apr-27-13  DoctorD: Based on the names ("Dumas= "dumb a$$" and a generic "Latino"), I would have guessed this to be a fakery (although FSR posting it speaks against that as well), but the USCF MSA confirms the players.
Apr-27-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: And that's the Steven R Dumas I remember. For many years, the Michigan Open had Open and Reserve sections, with the dividing line at 1800. Despite a rating consistently around 1300, Dumas often played in the Open Section, with expected results.

I suppose he must have enjoyed doing so, but I never saw the sense of it. Losing is bad enough, but at least you can generally learn something if the game is competitive. Getting flattened by a steam roller teaches you nothing.

Apr-27-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <DoctorD> I found the game in ChessBase's Mega Database 2013. I too thought "Latino" was an odd surname.

<Phony Benoni> Maybe he really <is> a - never mind.

Apr-27-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <FSR> You probably know a few people who think the same way. They've been told the best way to improve is to play stronger competition, so they seek out the best possible.

I only tried it once, at a Class competition where my Class B section and the Class A section both had an odd number of players. I volunteered to play in Class A to even out the sections--and went an ugly 0-4.

Apr-27-13  Wayne Proudlove: PhonyBenoni,
constantly losing to stronger opponents is an overrated way to learn, unless the superior player brings an intentionally didactic approach to the game. Winning teaches too and feels better of course. But you know, you can't only know something intellectually, you need empirical knowledge and have to be thrown into those challenging endgames and come out on top. Of course you're not going to get that chance too often against much better players. I like to mix it up.
Apr-27-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: If one is stuck forever at 1300, I'm afraid one probably just doesn't have a knack for chess. I'm no Kasparov, but my first published rating, at age 13 I think, was 1383.
Apr-27-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Prior to this game, there were only a couple of draws known. The Black players were rated 2259 and 2199. http://www.365chess.com/search_resu.... In a similar line in the Slav, White has an even score (+1 =1 -1) in CG.com's database. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... The player who lost as Black (i.e. the side that's up a piece for nothing) was Anna Ushenina, who became Women's World Champion later the same year! L Galojan vs A Ushenina, 2012 Pretty amazing.
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