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Viswanathan Anand vs Dmitry Andreikin
World Chess Championship Candidates (2014), Khanty-Mansiysk RUS, rd 12, Mar-27
Caro-Kann Defense: Classical Variation. Main lines (B18)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 11 OF 11 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-27-14  Khapablanca: And this is the way Anand is going to beat Carlsen?
Mar-27-14  scormus: <41.Rc4!> Just been running it on the engine. Certainly it would have been a tough one to calculate OTB.

Vishy has been the best player in this tournament, so I hope he continues so and wins it impressively. Then give a good battle against Magnus.

Mar-27-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jim Bartle: Perfect photo caption of this game at chessbase:

<If by some disaster Anand doesn't win the Candidates, he has this game to blame>

Mar-27-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: < had ivanchuk been in a different mood that day...>

if, had, and "should have" have no bearing on realty. Only the actual results count.

Carlsen plays for a win in very close looking positions and gets those, wins, even among the world's greatest players. It is one of the things that sets him apart from the rest.

Mar-27-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  hoodrobin: Anand is leading 7.5/12, so he played well. He's a true sportsman. Carlsen must be careful! (Anand too, of course).
Mar-27-14  csmath: 18. a4!?

[All previous is theory and the last move is new but a computer analysis. This is a very sharp variation and I do not like black position here.]

21. ...c5!?

[This is natural move as black refuses to wait for white attack for example ...Rfe8 22. Ne4 Nxe4 23. Qxe4 Nf6 24. Qf3 c5 25. g4!


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25. ...cxd4 26. Re2 Nd7 27. Nd3 Bf8 28. g5 Qc6 28. Qg4 and white attack looks extremely dangerous but it is easily parried: 28. ...f5! 29. gxf6 Nxf6 30. Qg6 Qf3 31. Rde1 Qh3 32. Re5. Andreikin's move in the game is a matter of taste.]

24. ...Qc8?
[Big error. 24. ...Nc8 was better albeit passive move. The best resolution: 24. ...Nbxd5! 25. Rxd5 Nxd5 26. Rxd5 Rxd5 27. Qxd5 Rd8


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and black rook and a pawn for two knights but due to open white king the game is equal.]

25. d6!
[obvious and very strong]

25. ... Rfe8?!
[Understandable to activate rook before d7 is played. However 25. ...Qe6 26. Qxb7 c4 seems more resistant.]

26. Nh5!
and white is winning.


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26. ...Re6
[26. ...Qf5 27. g4! Qh7 28. g5! and black is lost for example 28. ...Nxh5 29. g6! fxg6 30. Qxb7 Rf8 31. Qxb6 threatening Nc6.


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]

28. d7!

[and it looks like Anand is playing fantastic tactical chess. It is only a matter of time for Andreikin to resign. Or is it?]

29. Qg4?!
[29. Ng4! is amazingly strong: ...Rc6 30. f5! c4 31. Bf4 and black is hopeless.


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]

37. Qf3?!
[37. Bd2! Nc5 38. Ka3 and black is again hopelessly with piece down for example 38. ...Nxd7 39. Kb2 Rd6 40. Bc3.


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And this was not really hard to find.]

41. Kb3?

[The last chance in a tactical win:
41. Rc4! (even Kd2 looks to be winning as well although white is forced to give rook in this line in a less advantageous way) ... bxc4 42. Qxa3 (threatening Qe7) Nc5 43. Rd5 Nb7 44. Qc3 Rd6 45. Rxd6 Nxd6 (45. Qxd6? Qxc4) 46. Qg3 Rxd7 47. Nxd7 Qxd7 48. Qxg6 Kf8 49. Qxh6 and without much tactics left black is lost in a hopeless ending.


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]

=======

While Anand's last chance to win the game might have been proven "too much tactical" his middlegame looked like he has enough energy to do that yet he simply took the practical way out and gifted a draw to Andreikin. This is certainly a disappointment. Not a bad game though.

Mar-27-14  optimal play: I was following this game live last night but it was getting late so I went to bed when it seemed Vishy had it wrapped up.

Catching up on the result now, I'm astonished to see Anand allowed Andreikin to escape with a draw!

Carlsen's biggest problem will be overconfidence!

Mar-27-14  Marmot PFL: <<Jim Bartle: What surprised me is that Anand didn't play 37. Bd2. Seems clearly better than Qf3>

Anand may have quickly realized that also, and missing something like that affected his self-confidence needed to continue the game. Once mistakes begin more may occur, so better to play it safe. A few weeks back Nakamura had a winning position against Carlsen, missed the win, and still trying for it blundered again and lost.

Mar-27-14  Everett: < Jim Bartle: What surprised me is that Anand didn't play 37. Bd2. Seems clearly better than Qf3.>

With all do respect to Anand, I agree. What do you think scared him away from that move? What does Qf3 do that Bd2 doesn't, and what does Bd2 allow? Does it have to do with what Anand wants to capture a3 with? Perhaps it was just intuitive to bring his Q back into play, via d5+ or another square.

Mar-27-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jim Bartle: Anand took a long time on move 37.

Looking <afterward>, 37. Bd2 covers c3, of course; vacates c1 for the rook eventually; allows the queen to continue pinning the black king on the g-file; and protects the rook on b4 so white can play Kxa3 at some point without the threat of losing that rook to a queen check.

Mar-27-14  DrGridlock: Much discussion on the game ending in a draw, and whether Anand had more in the final position. At move 39, Anand had 3 good options: Rc4, Kd2 and the draw by repition offer of Kb3.


click for larger view

1. (1.96): 39.Rc4 bxc4 40.Qxa3 Nc5 41.Rd5 Nb7 42.Qc3 Rd6 43.Rxd6 Nxd6 44.Qg3 Rxd7 45.Nxd7 Qxd7 46.Qxg6+ Kf8 47.Qxh6+ Kg8 48.Qg6+ Kf8 49.Bb2 Qa4+ 50.Kc1 Ke7 51.Bf6+ Kd7 52.Be5 Qa3+ 53.Kd1 Qa4+ 54.Ke1 Nb5

2. } (1.25): 39.Kd2 Qd6+ 40.Nd3 Rf7 41.Ke1 Rfxd7 42.Rd2 Nb6 43.Kf1 Qc7 44.Kg1 Nc4 45.Rd1 Qb6+ 46.Kh2 Rd5 47.Rb3 Rh5+ 48.Kg3 Qf6 49.Kf2 Re8 50.Kg1 Qh4 51.Qc6 Re2 52.Qxg6+ Kh8 53.Kf1 Rxa2 54.Qe8+ Kg7

Komodo confirms what others have suggested, that Rc4 should be a comofortable win, and Kd2, while less comfortable, should still be enough for a win.

Looking deeper at the Rc4 line is interesting. Alejandro Ramirez's comments for Chessbase are,

"[41.Rc4! The best way bxc4.Bxa3 Now White has decsive threats of his own, not of which the least is Be7. It is not clear how to respond to this, but White's king is still in optical danger. The truth may be that it is impossible for Black to organize himself and White is just winning in this position. A crazy adventure.]"

Ramirez focuses on 40 Bxa3 as White's best, but computers suggest that 40 Qxa3 is the "correct" capture for White.


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1. (2.23): 40.Qxa3 Nc5 41.Rd5 Nb7 42.Qc3 Rd6 43.Rxd6 Nxd6 44.Qg3 Rxd7 45.Nxd7 Qxd7 46.Qxg6+ Kf8 47.Qxh6+ Kg8 48.Bb2 Qf5+ 49.Kc1 Ne8 50.Qh8+ Kf7 51.Qd4 Qc8 52.Bc3 Qe6 53.a4 Qc6 54.a5 Qe6 55.Kb2 Qc6

2. } (1.21): 40.Bxa3 Kh7 41.Be7 Qb8 42.Rb1 Qxe5 43.fxe5 Rxf3 44.gxf3 Rxd7 45.Bd6 Kg7 46.Rb4 Ra7 47.e6 Ra8 48.Rxc4 Nb6 49.Be5+ Kf8 50.Rc7 Rxa2+ 51.Kd3 g5 52.Rh7 Nd5 53.Kd4 Ra5 54.Ke4 Ne7 55.Rxh6 Ra4+

Taking with the Bishop instead of the Queen on a3 and White might as well be playing the Kd2 line.

White had a victory in the Rc4/Qxa3 line, but this is a very tactical line in which it is easy for White to miss key moves.

Anand mentioned the difficulty in calculating lines, and his level of fatigue. Given that he had a pretty clear path to a rematch with Anand, a draw here is not a terrible option for Anand to have taken.

Mar-27-14  SirRuthless: <SirWotsit: For everyone saying Carlsen would have done X, y and Z... Carlsen was, if i recall correctly. choking his guts out in candidates....>

Really?

<Yes he choked like a dog on a large bone in the final two rounds, it is undeniable. It happens to the best of them but it was no cruise through to the final was it? Did not Ivanchuk have carlsen's fate in his hands in the final round?>

<(Carlsen) isn't god and makes his share of mistakes like every one else....>

Not quite the case, for he makes fewer errors than others.<I said his share, learn to read Perstalker>

<....I love how anyone can pretend to know what these players are going through at the table with a certainty. It's fun but this derogatory chatter about anand is ridiculous.>

This statement is pure hypocrisy, prone as you are to trash-talk about even your favourite, Nakamura, when he is not quite on form.

<Two wrongs or better yet, N wrongs do not make a right do they?>

Mar-27-14  DrLecter: Anand's game ends at move 40 whereas Carlsen's starts on move 40.
Mar-27-14  VaselineTopLove: Had this game been drawn at all points, I'd be ok with the final draw result and ok with Anand not seeking a win at this juncture of the tournament, given his standings.

But I'm a bit disappointed that he mis-evaluated a winning position and chose to repeat after the time control, when he could have spent more time to come up with the correct plan. I don't think he had to find "only" moves, as several moves win, and what's more, tactics are supposed to be his forte.

Mar-27-14  optimal play: An interesting alternative to the obvious (and not at all bad) 23.cxd5 might have been 23.Nf5

e.g. 23.Nf5 dxc4 24.Rxd7 Rxd7 25.Qg3 Ne8 26.Nxc4 f6 27.Qg6 Qd8 28.Nxh6+ Kh8 29.Nf5 --->


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White sacrifices the exchange for a strong attack!

ok, it would have been pretty ballsy in this situation, but isn't that what's needed to go up against Carlsen?

Mar-27-14  Marmot PFL: <With all do respect to Anand, I agree. What do you think scared him away from that move? What does Qf3 do that Bd2 doesn't, and what does Bd2 allow? Does it have to do with what Anand wants to capture a3 with? Perhaps it was just intuitive to bring his Q back into play, via d5+ or another square.>

Big difference is in the line 37 Bd2 Nc5+ 38 Kxa3 Qa5+ 39 Kb2 and the Bd2 guards the rook, which Qf3 does not. Not very complicated for Anand, but he was already calculating complicated lines for some time and just missed it. Well that happens, and Andreikin is a resourceful player as he has shown already.

Mar-28-14  Pasker: Anand played a bit cautiously here because he got the lead already in the tournanment. A draw is good for him. Playing for win while king is exposed might lead to blunder as they are human beings not chess engines.
Mar-28-14  Ulhumbrus: Anand did not say that he had not seen Kd2 at the end or had not considered it advantageous. He said that he was very tired and could not see it clearly to the end, that he decided not to tempt fate and made a practical decision.
Mar-29-14  visayanbraindoctor: Even if it was a practical decision, this game worries me. It indicates a slight confidence problem with Anand. Fischer, Kasparov and Carlsen would win this game no questions asked.

Anand cannot afford to play a little scared against Carlsen in their rematch, or he will simply get crushed again. He has to believe in himself if he is to have a fighting chance.

Mar-29-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: "Anand cannot afford to play a little scared against Carlsen in their rematch."

Anand knew what he was doing, (and he is better at this game than all of us here.) taking the draw was the correct decision.

It's OK for players with computers to start suggesting that here...


click for larger view

...White can play for a win with 41.Rc4.

They have not been calculating and analysing 'unaided' at the board.

It would have taken a lot out of Anand to see and allow that the discovered Knight check led to no more than a perpetual. Usually Knight discovered checks are game winners.

Anand knew he had drifted somewhat in this game and it's hard work facing the psycholigal edge the losing player has when he has counter-play. The losing player if firing on all pistons.

One other game that mattered was already drawn. No harm done, no need to look any further, take the draw.

Apr-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Landman: In a later press conference (see http://candidates2014.fide.com/cate... round 14 starting 06:17:50) Anand mentioned that before taking the draw with 41.♔b3 he had calculated 41. ♖c4 bxc4 42. ♕xa3 ♘c5 43.♖d5 ♘d3 44.♕e7 ♕b6 and then after any move attacking the ♕b6 [overloaded from protecting d8 and f6; presumably he means a move like 45.♘xc4 or 35.♗e3], black then has 45...♘b4+! 46. ♔moves (say d1) ♘xd5! 47.[♗ or ♘]x♕b6 ♘d5x♕e7 winning. The only move he missed was 45.♖b5! which succeeds with the overload and cements the winning position.
Apr-02-14  SirRuthless: I figured he tested that idea but couldn't make it work. All he needed was the point since at that point in the event a draw was infinitely more valuable than a loss whereas a win was not much more valuable than a draw and it turns out his intuition about needing two draws was right although he did cut it close in the following round.
Apr-02-14  SirRuthless: <HeMateMe: < had ivanchuk been in a different mood that day...>

if, had, and "should have" have no bearing on realty. Only the actual results count.

Carlsen plays for a win in very close looking positions and gets those, wins, even among the world's greatest players. It is one of the things that sets him apart from the rest.>

Completely absurd. You make what carlsen does (finding good moves on the most consistent basis of all of the elite players) sound like magic but it's really not. You deny that if Ivanchuk felt like it he could have sent Kramnik to the championship? Carlsen won... On tie-breaks! Most wins. There was no point difference between Kramnik and Carlsen in that event. Ivanchuk defeated Carlsen and then played for a win vs Kramnik who only needed a draw to get the final and you bandy the "ifs buts candy and nuts" reasoning about like the idea was so far fetched. Ridiculous. Carlsen was one strange look frown or smile at Ivanchuk away from not even being in the WCC match and that is simply undeniable.

Apr-02-14  Assignment Troll: I though Kramnik mainly had himself to blame for that last round loss but I enjoy the picture <SirMuraless> paints.

Ivanchuk raises his hands to the heavens (to stretch, obviously) whereupon a steely glance from magnus causes him to grab at kramnik's throat. Vlad, terrified tries to wriggle free but hears Ivanchuk whisper, "I'm going to let the boy advance, I do not like Russian cowboys."

Nov-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Landman: Scores before round 12, with 3 rounds to go. A lot to be said for taking the sure draw.

7.0 Anand
6.0 Aronian
5.5 Karjakin
5.5 Mamedyarov
5.5 Svidler
5.0 Andreikin
5.0 Kramnik
4.5 Topalov

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