chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
Fabiano Caruana vs Alexander Grischuk
World Championship Candidates (2018), Berlin GER, rd 6, Mar-16
King's Indian Defense: Normal. King's Knight Variation (E60)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 66 more Caruana/Grischuk games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can make these tips go away by registering a free account then visiting your preferences page. Simply check the option "Don't show random tips on game pages." and click the Update Profile button at the bottom.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 7 OF 7 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-16-18  chessic eric: looks as though black values the c4 pawn more for keeping the white knight out of d3 than for advance?! A white N d3 does contest e5 and begin to own the center more completely...
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: <AE> I agree. I think c3 was far superior.
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: Anyway, the website needs financial support and access to the engine is one motivation to get a premium membership. Anyone who has a computer and internet access can afford 8 cents a day, except maybe Big Pestilence who is no doubt watching in the basement of an asylum for the criminally insane.
Mar-16-18  tigreton: The pawn on c4 keeps the white knight away from going to d3
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: But now black has a second chance! Bb6 and then c3
Mar-16-18  Ulhumbrus: Draw agreed. Perhaps neither player is sure whether he stands better or worse.
Mar-16-18  chessic eric: repetition!?
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Draw agreed - no need for Caruana to take high risks with only 42sec left
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: Draw. What courage these gentlemen demonstrate!
Mar-16-18  tigreton: Grischuk is a surviver!
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: So + Mame on the verge of winning
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: Maybe time pressure was too much so white forces draw. Fabi has to learn better time skills, trust instincts more and not over-calculate everything. The position was in his favor so it's a lost opportunity.
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: A rather sudden draw! Good game, though.
Mar-16-18  Ulhumbrus: If Caruana was in time trouble that explains the result. He preferred to not risk throwing the game away.
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessdgc2: Why does White continue to repeat moves with 36. Bg3? Why not 36. Nxc4 instead?
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: Maybe not so much for white as I thought as black has compensation with his passed pawn.
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: chessdgc2: 36 Nxc4 Rxd6 37 Nxd6 Qc5+
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: "I was calculating a lot and played a complicated move when a simple move would have sufficed" FC
Mar-16-18  dangerhump: Game is a Benoni but listed as KI?
Mar-16-18  Severin: Magnus would never offer draw here. That's why he's the champion.
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier: i agree <Severin> .
Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4: d 24 dpa done

1. + / = (0.65): 33.Rc1 Nb6 34.Kh1 Qc5 35.Be1 Nxd5 36.Bxb4 Qxb4 37.Qxc4 Bxb2 38.Qxb4 Nxb4 39.Rxb2 Nd3 40.Rcc2 Nxb2 41.Rxb2 f5 42.exf5 gxf5 43.gxf5 Kf7 44.Kg2 Kf6 45.Rb5 Rg8+ 46.Kf2 Ra8 47.Kg3 Ra7 48.h3 Rc7 49.h4 h5

2. + / = (0.58): 33.Kg2 Nb6 34.d6 Qc6 35.Nd1 c3 36.Rc2 Bd4 37.Re1 Kg7 38.Qd3 Nd7 39.Ne3 Ne5 40.Bxe5+ Bxe5 41.Nd5 Rd4 42.Qxc3 Qxd6 43.Qe3 Ra4 44.f4 Bd4 45.Qd3 Qd7 46.h3 Rb8 47.Rd1 Qe6 48.Kg3 h5 49.gxh5 gxh5 50.f5

3. + / = (0.54): 33.Nd1 Rb3 34.Kg2 Qc5 35.Rc2 c3 36.Re1 Qd4 37.Ne3 Ra8 38.Rd1 Qb4 39.Rdc1 Bd4 40.d6 Nb6 41.Qd3 Rd8 42.Bf4 Qc5 43.h3 Na4 44.Rd1 Rb4 45.Nd5

Mar-16-18  Lupara: Hmm ... In response to <Severin> and <cormier>, I recalll another Candidates game where a player repeated a three move repetition in an unbalanced position with plenty of time on his clock against Grischuk no less.

I didn't criticize his decision then and I would not do so now.

Here's the games: Grischuk vs Carlsen, 2013

The difference is Caruana seems to have a bit of an advantage in this game but only 42 seconds plus a 30 second increment to make 4 moves to reach the the 40th move. But this position is risky, as Grischuk has good counterplay.

I think the Carlsen of today would have played on in that same position from the 2013 Candidates game and probably ground down Grischuk if the tournament was not a Candidates, but a Tata or Norway or Sinqfield or London Classic.

But then again, the context of the tournament stakes and setting may influence a player's decision on whether to press on regardless of the risk or whether to make a safe choice and draw.

Just my humble opinion.

Mar-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier: well, i think Carl know's when to have fun, i didn't knew thou Caruana only had seconds left ..... ths
Mar-17-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier: <if he had played 33.Rc1>


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4: d 29 dpa done; i was visuallysing the position of the white knight, but didn't tought to check to look for the black piece plan this time ...

1. + / = (0.52): 33...c3 34.Nd3 Rd4 <35.Nf4> Nc5 36.Qb5 Rd2 37.Rxd2 cxd2 38.Rd1 Nxe4 39.fxe4 Rxe4 40.Nd3 Bd4+ 41.Kg2 Qc2 42.Qb1 Qc4 43.Rxd2 Qxd5 44.Kf1 Rf4+ 45.Nxf4 Qh1+ 46.Ke2 Qxb1 47.Rxd4 Qc2+ 48.Ke3 Qc1+ 49.Kf3 Qc3+ 50.Rd3 Qf6 51.Kg2 Qc6+ 52.Kf2 Qf6 53.Kg1 Qe7 54.Nd5 Qe6 55.Kf2 Kg7 56.Rd4 f5 57.g5 h6

<2. + / = (0.53): 33...Nb6> 34.Kh1 Bh6 35.Rd1 Bg7 36.d6 Qd7 37.Rc1 Qe6 38.Rc2 Bd4 39.Ra5 c3 40.Nd3 Rb1+ 41.Rc1 Qb3 42.Bf4 Nd7 43.Kg2 Rxc1 44.Bxc1 Rb8 45.e5 Bb6 46.Ra1 Qc4 47.Qe4 Qxe4 48.fxe4 Bd4 49.Bf4 Kg7 50.Rc1 h6

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 7)
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 7 OF 7 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2018, Chessgames Services LLC