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Fabiano Caruana vs Magnus Carlsen
GRENKE Chess Classic (2018), Karlsruhe GER, rd 1, Mar-31
King's Indian Defense: Normal. King's Knight Variation (E60)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 15 OF 15 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-01-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: < GM Jan Gustafsson said that even after studying the rook ending in this game with the computer for two hours his understanding of it was not much increased.>

Understanding chess seems to be hard for Germans. The largest (next to Russia) and probably most literate country in Europe and they have like one player in the top one hundred. And he is actually Romanian.

Apr-01-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gregor Samsa Mendel: <Marmot PFL: Understanding chess seems to be hard for Germans.>

Anderssen and Lasker didn't seem to have much trouble.

Apr-01-18  Ulhumbrus: <Marmot PFL: < GM Jan Gustafsson said that even after studying the rook ending in this game with the computer for two hours his understanding of it was not much increased.>

Understanding chess seems to be hard for Germans.> Considering that Capablanca himself said that rook and pawn endings were extremely difficult it is a high compliment to Germans to say that rook and pawn endings seem hard for Germans.

Apr-01-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: <Anderssen and Lasker didn't seem to have much trouble.>

I'll be watching for them in the upcoming Olympiad.

Apr-01-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Marmot PFL> Most of them learn chess late, barely get funding (for coaches) and have serious jobs afterwards, i.e. they are amateurs.

But what do I know... ;)

Apr-01-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Marmot PFL . . . Understanding chess seems to be hard for Germans. The largest (next to Russia) and probably most literate country in Europe and they have like one player in the top one hundred. And he is actually Romanian.>

Ouch! But you are right that Nisipeanu, not usually thought of as German, appears to be the only person listed as German in the top 100. https://ratings.fide.com/top.phtml?... Huebner was very strong, but that was a few decades ago.

Apr-01-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: To give you an idea of the generally low level, I used to beat everybody playing with the huge pieces behind the Atlantic Parkhotel in Baden-Baden, but Hübner (who lives in the neighborhood, or at least he did at the time) never stopped by.
Apr-01-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: <Richard Taylor: In addition the idea of Rh7 is far from obvious. To a machine it is. I cant quite see why it wins. I am not sure at what point it could be played.>

This move could have been played first after 46.h5


click for larger view

"Chess engines suggest a rather inhuman move 46...Rh7! although its idea is easy to understand:

Black is just stopping the enemy pawns before going after the a-pawn." (GM Alexander Baburin)

47.Rf4+ Kd5 48.Rf3 Kc4 49.Rf4+ Kb3 50.Rb4+ Kxa3 51.Rc4 Kb3 52.Rc8


click for larger view

52…a5 53.Rb8+ Ka2 54.Rc8 a4 55.Kxd3 Kb1

Apr-01-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <Marmot PFL: < GM Jan Gustafsson said that even after studying the rook ending in this game with the computer for two hours his understanding of it was not much increased.> Understanding chess seems to be hard for Germans. The largest (next to Russia) and probably most literate country in Europe and they have like one player in the top one hundred. And he is actually Romanian.>

Everything is hard for Germans...in fact my grandson is part German and I noticed that the German part has trouble understanding that his grandfather is a genius.

As well as that they...ooops!

"Don't mention the war!"

But to be fairL Jan Gustafsson watches too many crapulous movies and spends all his spare hours peering at a computer screen or reading dubious books. Possibly eating apple strudel and drinking coffee of German beer. Carlsen, for example, is highly cultured and reads books. He is, after all from the land of Amundsen, Ibsen, and...hmm, the great writer Hamsun.

Let's face it, Germans, despite all their faults, are always jolly whereas it is well known that Russians and all that lot are permanently permafrosted into their deep and incurable Slavic gloom. They are often as dour and (on the face of it) as the very un-Slavic Botvinnik. Svidler escaped all that gloom and misery and so on to live out side Russia.

In reality, to be serious, chess is hard for anyone to understand. It seems that Carlsen missed the way to win also and he is the World Champion.

Surely this is a sign he is not really that good?

Apr-01-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I done a lo' a spellin' moostukies oop their...bother...
Apr-01-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Video analysis of this game: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQn....
Apr-01-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: <Anderssen and Lasker didn't seem to have much trouble.>

<I'll be watching for them in the upcoming Olympiad.>

But they're hiding prep.

Apr-02-18  Jambow: I will be rooting for Caruana but I'm a Carlsen fan too so really just hoping for some interesting high level chess. Last WC match was a bit of a snoozer but at least no howlers... Magnus has been fairly steady the past two years Caruana is more of a question mark in the short term streaks anyway.
Apr-02-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Now trying varation <46.h5 Rh7>:


click for larger view

White to move

1) -11.54 (30 ply) 47.Rf4+ Kd5 48.Rf5+ Kc4 49.Rf4+ Kb3 50.Rb4+ Kxa3 51.Rc4 Kb2 52.Rb4+ Ka2 53.Rc4 a5 54.Rc5 a4 55.Kxd3 Kb1 56.Rb5+ Kc1 57.Ke2 a3 58.Ra5 Rc7 59.h6 Kb1 60.Rb5+ Ka2 61.h7 c1=Q 62.h8=Q Re7+ 63.Kd3 Qd1+ 64.Kc4 Qxg4+ 65.Qd4 Rc7+ 66.Kd3 Qd1+ 67.Ke4 Re7+ 68.Kd5 Rd7+ 69.Ke6 Qxd4 70.Re5 Qf4 71.Re1 Rd6+ 72.Ke7

2) -14.31 (30 ply) 47.Rf3 Kc4 48.Rf4+ Kb3 49.Rb4+ Kxa3 50.Rc4 Kb2 51.Rb4+ Ka2 52.Rc4 a5 53.Rc8 Kb2 54.Rb8+ Ka1 55.Rc8 a4 56.Kxd3 Kb1 57.Rb8+ Kc1 58.Ke2 a3 59.Kf1 a2 60.Ra8 Kb2 61.Rb8+ Kc3 62.Rc8+ Kb4 63.Rb8+ Kc5 64.Rc8+ Kb6 65.Kg2 a1=Q 66.Kh3 Qf1+ 67.Kg3 c1=Q 68.Rxc1 Qxc1 69.Kh4

3) -132.62 (30 ply) 47.a4 Re7 48.Rf4+ Kd5 49.Rf1 Kc4 50.Rf4+ Kb3 51.Rf1 Re4 52.Rf8 Re2+ 53.Kxd3 c1=Q 54.Kxe2 Qc4+ 55.Kf3 Qf1+ 56.Ke4 Qxf8 57.a5 Qb4+ 58.Kf5 Qxa5+ 59.Kg6 Qb6+ 60.Kf5 Qc5+ 61.Kg6 Qc6+ 62.Kf5 Qf3+ 63.Kg5 Ka4 64.Kh4 Qe3 65.g5 Qf4+ 66.Kh3 Qxg5 67.Kh2 Qxh5+ 68.Kg2

15.0 minute analysis by Stockfish 9 v010218

Apr-02-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: So all will lead to <46.h5 Rh7 47.Rf4+ Kd5 48.Rf5+ Kc4 49.Rf4+ Kb3 50.Rb4+ Kxa3 51.Rc4 Kb2 52.Rb4+ Ka2 53.Rc4>


click for larger view

Black to move

1) -21.13 (27 ply) 53...a5 54.Rc6 a4 55.h6 a3 56.Kxd3 Kb1 57.Rb6+ Kc1 58.Ke2 Re7+ 59.Kf2 a2 60.Ra6 Kb2 61.Rb6+ Kc3 62.Rc6+ Kd3 63.Kf3 a1=Q 64.Rd6+ Kc4 65.Rc6+ Kb4 66.h7 Qh1+ 67.Kg3 Re3+ 68.Kf4 Qxc6 69.h8=Q c1=Q 70.Qb2+ Qxb2 71.Kxe3

2) -16.17 (27 ply) 53...Kb2 54.Rb4+ Ka2 55.Rc4 a5 56.Rc6 a4 57.h6 a3 58.g5 Kb1 59.Rb6+ Ka1 60.Rc6 a2 61.Rc5 Rb7 62.h7 Rxh7 63.g6 Rh2+ 64.Kxd3 Kb1 65.Rb5+ Kc1 66.Ra5 Rg2 67.Ra6 Rg3+ 68.Ke2 Rg5 69.Kf1 Kb2 70.Rb6+ Kc3 71.Rc6+ Kb4 72.Kf2 c1=Q 73.Ra6 Qf4+ 74.Ke2

3) -15.07 (27 ply) 53...Kb1 54.Rc8 a5 55.Rb8+ Ka2 56.Rc8 a4 57.Kxd3 Kb1 58.Rb8+ Kc1 59.Ke3 a3 60.Kf2 Re7 61.Ra8 Kb2 62.Rb8+ Kc3 63.Rc8+ Kd3 64.Rd8+ Ke4 65.Ra8 c1=Q 66.Kg2 Kd3 67.Rd8+ Ke2 68.Rd6 Qf1+ 69.Kh2 Qf4+ 70.Kh3 Re3+ 71.Kh4 Qxd6 72.Kg5 Qe5+ 73.Kg6

15.0 minute analysis by Stockfish 9 v010218

Apr-02-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier: more precise is: 48...Kc4 49.Rf4+ Kb3 50.Rb4+ Kxa3 51.Rc4 Kb3 52.Rc8 Rh7 53. Rb8+ Ka2 54. Rc8 a5


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4: d 26 dpa

1. -+ (-3.12): 55.Ra8 Rc7 56.Rxa5+ Kb3 57.Ra1 Rc4 58.Rg1 Re4 59.Kxd3 Rxg4 60.Rxg4 c1Q 61.Rd4 Qc2+ 62.Ke3 Qf5 63.Rh4 Kc3 64.Re4 Qf6 65.Rf4 Qe5+ 66.Kf3 Qxh5+ 67.Ke4 Kc4 68.Rf5 Qh4+ 69.Ke5 Qe7+ 70.Kf4 Kd4 71.Kg4 Qg7+ 72.Kf3 Qb7+ 73.Kg3 Qc7+ 74.Kg4 Qg7+ 75.Kf3

2. -+ (-6.07): 55.Rc6 a4 56.Kxd3 Kb1 57.Rb6+ Kc1 58.Rc6 Kd1 59.Rxc2 Rd7+ 60.Kc3 Rc7+ 61.Kb4 Kxc2 62.h6 Rh7 63.g5 Kd3 64.Kxa4 Ke4 65.Kb5 Kf4 66.Kc4 Kxg5 67.Kd5 Kf5 68.Kc5 Rxh6 69.Kd5 Rf6 70.Kd4 Rg6 71.Kc4 Ke4 72.Kb4 Kd4 73.Kb5 Kd5 74.Kb4 Rb6+ 75.Kc3 Rb7 76.Kd3 Rb3+ 77.Kc2 Rg3 78.Kd2 Ke4 79.Kc2 Kd4 80.Kb2 Rg6 81.Kb3 Rb6+ 82.Kc2 Rb8 83.Kc1 Kd3

3. -+ (-6.08): 55.Kxd3 Kb1 56.Rb8+ Kc1 57.Rc8 Kd1 58.Rxc2 Rd7+ 59.Kc3 Rc7+ 60.Kb3 Rxc2 61.Ka4 Ke2 62.Kxa5 Kf3 63.g5 Rh2 64.Kb5 Rxh5 65.Kc6 Ke4 66.Kd7 Rxg5 67.Kd6 Kf5 68.Kd7 Ke5 69.Kc6 Rg6+ 70.Kc5 Rh6 71.Kb4 Kd4 72.Kb5 Kd5 73.Kb4 Rb6+ 74.Kc3 Rb7 75.Kd3 Rb3+ 76.Kc2 Rg3 77.Kd2 Ke4 78.Kc2 Kd4 79.Kb2 Rg6 80.Kb3 Rb6+ 81.Kc2 Rb8 82.Kc1 Kd3

also as said:

55. Kxd3 Kb1! 56. Rxc2 losing the rook - 56... Rd7+ 57. Kc3 Rc7+.

Apr-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jonathan Sarfati: Hard game. Caruana definitely struggled with White, which can't happen in their coming match if it's to be a real struggle.
Apr-17-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jonathan Sarfati: Then again, maybe not, since Caruana won this tourney a point clear of runner-up Carlsen.
Apr-17-18  RookFile: Caruana should be able to play the first 20 moves of the game perfectly, especially in this day of computer analysis. However, I suspect he didn't want to reveal his main weapons, and played accordingly in this game.
May-05-18  Stonehenge: Almost Cut My Heir
May-05-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <Stonehenge: Almost Cut My Heir>

Excellent. For CSN&Y fans only.

May-18-18  djvanscoy: <Richard Taylor: ... Jan Gustafsson watches too many crapulous movies ... > "Leaving Las Vegas" or "One for the Road" or "My Favorite Year"? I'm trying to think what might qualify as a crapulous movie.
May-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <djvanscoy: <Richard Taylor: ... Jan Gustafsson watches too many crapulous movies ... > "Leaving Las Vegas" or "One for the Road" or "My Favorite Year"? I'm trying to think what might qualify as a crapulous movie.>

Of course it was a joke. But I suppose there are some really bad ones. I don't watch many these days. To be serious I remember the ones I enjoyed which is the main thing.

I see, you're taking the literal meaning. 'One for the Road', I wasn't with you, now the penny drops. There could be such a movie indeed!

I wonder if 'crapulous' is an official word in Anglo and or US dictionaries. But then I make words up all the time. 'Crap' of course is a word...'Crappy' is perhaps more apposite...

Consulting a dictionary it seems that crap etc is something that is bad while crapulent or crapulous means very drunk...

If it matters...

May-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Count Wedgemore: <"Leaving Las Vegas" or "One for the Road" or "My Favorite Year"? I'm trying to think what might qualify as a crapulous movie.>

<Consulting a dictionary it seems that crap etc is something that is bad while crapulent or crapulous means very drunk...>

Well, 'Leaving Las Vegas' was about a drunkard who drinks himself to death, so it fits the bill perfectly: it's both a crappy AND crapulous movie.

May-18-18  Clement Fraud: It is interesting - if a little bizarre - to see a super GM struggle in a game like this one. Vladimir Kramnik has - in all truth - refuted the King's Indian Defense: For instance, there are very few GMs now who would be willing to try the K.I.D against Kramnik - and especially not in games played using classical time controls (like this one). Magnus Carlsen has employed the King's Indian only once against Kramnik - a game where he was fortunate to escape with a draw (and even that was only a rapid game). Yet here, Carlsen is content to use the King's Indian against Caruana; and in a hard fought game Carlsen was never in any danger of losing (but this would surely not have been the case had Kramnik been his opponent).

Fabiano needs to get practicing how to play these closed positions before the forthcoming WCC; because if he doesn't do this, Carlsen will enjoy an easy defense of his championship (and that is the very last thing that's needed by the game of chess).

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