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Akiba Rubinstein vs Alexander Alekhine
"Rubin It In" (game of the day Jun-30-2015)
Karlsbad (1911), rd 23, Sep-21
Slav Defense: Suchting Variation (D15)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 37 times; par: 155 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-06-08  invas0rX: Але́хин solo tenia 29 aņos era jove en el mjuego ciencias
Feb-12-13  SirChrislov: This is the other Rubinstein classic rook endgame

Rubinstein vs Lasker, 1909

Oct-18-13  Cemoblanca: The games of Akiba are always something special. He was a true artist and 1 of the best.
Oct-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: < invas0rX: Але́хин solo tenia 29 aņos era jove en el mjuego ciencias>

Was that a mis-type?
Alekhine was a nineteen-year-old when this game was played.

May-03-15  Howard: Remind me to nominate this for GOTD !

By the way, this was apparently the first time these two met in a classical game, correct ?

One reason for the inquiry is because in Chernev's book Wonders and Curiosities of Chess, he shows the "first" time these two played, but I seem to remember the game wasn't nearly this long ! Could be wrong though.

May-03-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Howard> Is the "other games between same players" button not available for non-premium members?

Anyway, Alekhine vs Rubinstein, 1910.

Another famous early encounter:

Alekhine vs Rubinstein, 1912

May-03-15  Howard: Yes, but the 1910 encounter was certainly not a classical game, as I'd specified earlier.
May-03-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <May-03-15 Howard: Yes, but the 1910 encounter was certainly not a classical game, as I'd specified earlier.>

Why do you think so? Because it's an exhibition? I would certainly class Capablanca's exhibition games in 1913 and 1914 as classical. On the other hand I wouldn't class Pillsburys's defeat of Lasker in 1900, given the time control and conditions.

Jun-30-15  mruknowwho: Seems like a lot of things about chess change with the 2nd/7th rank, at least when pawns and rooks are involved.
Jun-30-15  RookFile: What an endgame. You could spend months studying this.
Jun-30-15  Shoukhath007: One of the amazing games ended on 7th rank.Amazing sacrifices, blunders etc watch the amazing entertainimg video with analysis. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KtksA...
Jun-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Great game. Alekhine's endgame skills were not yet fully developed
Jun-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Rubinstein was finally able to set the pawn up for promotion. neat one!
Jun-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: R4 could not find the win after the proposed improvement 36.Kd3:


click for larger view

Analysis by Deep Rybka 4.1 x64 TB6:

<[+0.48] d=31 36...Rc8> 37.Rxc8 Kxc8 38.f3 Kb7 39.e4 a5 40.bxa6+ Kxa6 41.exf5 gxf5 42.g4 Kb7 43.Kc3 Kc6 44.Kb3 Kd7 45.Ka4 Kc8 46.Kb4 Kd7 47.Kb5 Kc7 48.Ka4 Kc6 49.Kb4 Kd6 50.Kb5 Kc7 51.Ka4 Kc6

Jun-30-15  beatgiant: <RandomVisitor>
In the Rybka analysis above, why 41. exf5 instead of the obvious <41. e5>? I have a hard time finding a draw after that.
Jun-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: <beatgiant>After 36.Kd3 Rc8 37.Rxc8 Kxc8 38.f3 Kb7 39.e4 a5 40.bxa6+ Kxa6 41.e5, R4 still cannot find the win for white...


click for larger view

Analysis by Deep Rybka 4.1 x64: <TB6>

<[+0.33] d=31 41...Kb7> 42.Kc3 Kc6 43.Kc2 Kd7 44.Kb3 Kc6 45.Ka4 h6 46.Kb4 Kd7 47.Ka3 Ke6 48.Ka4 Kd7 49.Kb4 Kd8 50.Kb5 Kc7 51.Kb4 Kd7 52.Ka3 Ke6 53.Ka4 Kd7 54.Kb4 Kd8 55.Kb5 Kc7 56.Kb4 Kd7

Jul-01-15  beatgiant: <RandomVisitor>
From your diagram above, 41...Kb7 <42. Kc3> Kc6 43. Kb4 Kc7 44. Kb5 Kb7 45. e6 Kc7 46. e7 Kd7 47. Kxb6 Kxe7 48. Kc5 Ke6 49. Kc6 h6 50. Kc5 and Black will soon be in zugzwang.
Jul-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: <beatgiant>R4 would delay recapture with 47...h5
Jul-01-15  beatgiant: <RandomVisitor>
Then couldn't White play 48. Kc5 picking up the d-pawn, which eventually costs Black his kingside?
Jul-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: <beatgiant>

1: Akiba Rubinstein - Alexander Alekhine, Karlsbad 1911


click for larger view

Analysis by Deep Rybka 4.1 x64:

1. (-#23): 48.Kc5 g5 49.fxg5 f4 50.gxf4 Kxe7 51.Kxd5 h4 52.g6 Kf6 53.g7 Kxg7 54.f5

2. (-#20): 48.e8N Kxe8 49.Ka5 Kf7 50.Kb5 Ke7 51.Kb4 Kd7 52.Kc5 Ke6 53.Kb4 Kd7 54.Kc5 Ke6 55.Kb4 Kd7 56.Kc5 Ke6 57.Kb4 Kd7 58.Kc5 Ke6 59.Kb4 Kd7 60.Kc5 Ke6 61.Kb4 Kd7 62.Kc5 Ke6 63.Kb4

3. (-#20): 48.e8R Kxe8 49.Ka5 Kf7 50.Kb5 Ke7 51.Kb4 g5 52.fxg5 f4 53.gxf4 Kf7 54.Kc3 h4 55.Kd3 h3 56.Kc2 h2 57.f5 h1Q 58.Kd2 Qxf3 59.Kc2 Ke7 60.Kb1 Qxf5+ 61.Ka1

4. (-#20): 48.e8Q+ Kxe8 49.Ka5 Kf7 50.Kb5 Ke7 51.Kb4 Kd7 52.Kc5 Ke6 53.Kb4 Kd7 54.Kc5 Ke6 55.Kb4 Kd7 56.Kc5 Ke6 57.Kb4 Kd7 58.Kc5 Ke6 59.Kb4 Kd7 60.Kc5 Ke6 61.Kb4 Kd7 62.Kc5 Ke6 63.Kb4

5. (-#20): 48.Kb7 Kxe7 49.Kc6 Ke6 50.Kb5 g5 51.fxg5 f4 52.gxf4 h4 53.Kb6 h3 54.Kb5 Kf7 55.Kc6 h2 56.g6+ Kf6 57.Kd6 h1Q 58.Kc7 Qxf3 59.Kb7 Qxf4 60.Ka8 Kxg6 61.Ka7 Qxd4+ 62.Kb8

6. (-#20): 48.Kb5 Kxe7 49.Kb4 Kd7 50.Kc5 Ke6 51.Kb4 Kd7 52.Kc5 Ke6 53.Kb4 Kd7 54.Kc5 Ke6 55.Kb4 Kd7 56.Kc5 Ke6 57.Kb4 Kd7 58.Kc5 Ke6 59.Kb4 Kd7 60.Kc5 Ke6 61.Kb4 Kd7 62.Kc5 Ke6 63.Kb4

(, 01.07.2015)

Jul-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: <beatgiant>black goes on a suicidal pawn launch, which magically works out...
Jul-01-15  beatgiant: <RandomVisitor>
Ah, I missed Black's counterplay with <...g5> and that kills the whole line for White. So your computer may be right about no win after 36. Kd3.
Jul-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: <beatgiant>I am going to reset for a long run on 36.Kd3 and will post results sometime tomorrow.
Jul-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: R4 still can not find the win after the proposed improvement 36.Kd3 Rc8!:


click for larger view

Analysis by Deep Rybka 4.1 x64:

<[+0.48] d=35 37.Rxc8> Kxc8 38.f3 Kb7 39.e4 a5 40.bxa6+ Kxa6 41.exf5 gxf5 42.g4 Kb7 43.Kc3 Kc6 44.Kb3 Kd7 45.Ka4 Kc8 46.Kb4 Kd7 47.Kb5 Kc7 48.Ka4 Kc8 49.Kb4 Kd7 50.Kb5 Kc7 51.Ka4 Kc8 52.Kb4

Dec-25-15  joddon: how can a great player like alex leave his queen sitting on a square waiting for the queen excahnge....todays elite play a more dynamic game not waiting for the endgame to end with pawns and rooks.....i think playing dubious moves like bxb the way he does and not showing any major skill as a great tactician as he was proves there must have been some serious probelms on the side.....i think his alcoholsim started top play a role by this time.
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