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Jose Raul Capablanca vs Frank James Marshall
"No Way José" (game of the day Jul-07-2010)
Havana (1913), Havana CUB, rd 10, Feb-28
Russian Game: Classical Attack (C42)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 8 times; par: 94 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-07-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: Znosko-Borowsky did write a book about Capa's defeats - only 8 at the time.

Never heard that anecdote though.

Jul-07-10  Peter Nemenyi: This is an almost perfectly typical Capablanca game, until the slip on move 33. The position is generally quiet, but Capablanca has a little more space and a little more activity; he simplifies while acquiring one small advantage (B for N) and trading it for another (Black's isolated QP); it's all according to the pattern described so many times by Irving Chernev, apart from the result.

This was certainly a beautiful way to play, against Capablanca's level of opposition. I sometimes wonder whether, if he'd played against a deeper talent pool, his willingness to settle for quietly exploiting minor edges would have produced an intolerable number of draws.

Jul-07-10  screwdriver: " al wazir: Surely white wins a with 33. Re7 Rg8 (forced) 34. Rd7. If 34...Qb1+ 35. Kh2 Qc1/Qe4 (threatening to get a perpetual via 36. Qf4+), then 36. Qxf6. If 35...Qf5, then 36. Qxd5 Qf4+ 37. g3 Qc2+/Qf2+ 38. Qg2. If 34...Kh8, then 35. Bf8. How could Capa have missed this?"

Maybe he was overrated. Otherwise we're missing something.

Jul-07-10  tentsewang: LOL the blunder was the move 48. d5+??, a good move would be to move a4, not Bxh6 which will get into a trap. Good Game by sir Marshall!!
Jul-07-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: When first stepping the the moves of this game, I came to this position, which white faced on move #51:


click for larger view

My first impression was that 51.Bxe5 Kxe5 52.Ke3 Kxd5 53.Kxf3 might be drawn [diagram]


click for larger view

Alas, after checking it over with computer help, I see that black still wins with 53...Kd4!, because black doesn't have to fear stalemate. If the white king is immobilized on a1, then white must push a pawn, giving black a won pawn race.

However, in this line I noticed an <interesting swindle attempt> for white after 53...Kd4! 54.a4 a5 <55.h4!> [diagram]


click for larger view

Black is still winning, but only if he finds either 55...Kd3! or 55...Kd5! -- and neither of these moves are terribly obvious.

[A] If black gets sloppy and plays 55...gxh4?, then white draws with:

56.Kg2! Kc4 57.Kh3 Kb4 58.Kxh4 Kxa4 59.Kh5 Kb5 60.Kxh6, and both sides promote safely leading to a draw. This isn't obvious at move 55 since the white king must retreat to g2 and then capture 2 pawns on h4 and h6 while black only has to take one pawn. But white just barely has enough tempos to succeed.

[B] If black heads toward our a-pawn prematurely with 55...Kc4?, then white again draws:

56.hxg5 hxg5 57.Ke4 Kb4 58.Kf5 Kxa4 59.Kxg5 Kb5 60.Kf5, and again white manages to promote right after black promotes to earn a draw.

The winning moves, 55...Kd3 or 55...Kd5 both use zugzwang to force white to spend an extra tempo which makes the difference.

Jul-07-10  Mostolesdude: Dear chessgames.com:
2 years ago you posted a game of the day named "Spain beats Germany" right after the Euro Final. Can you please post another game like that after we beat The Netherlands on Sunday? Thanks very much. VIVA ESPAÑA !!!
Aug-11-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: Nice post, <YouRang>.
Aug-12-10  LIFE Master AJ: Ditto. (Good job, <yourang>.)
Sep-19-10  Whitehat1963: A good candidate for Guess-the-Move.
Aug-16-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eduardo Bermudez: "When the result was announced, the crowd let out a terrific roar. At first I thought they were after my blood for defeating their idol and asked for an escort to my hotel." Frank J. Marshall
Aug-16-11  haydn20: I remember the anecdote something like this--ZB: "I am thinking of writing a book on Capablanca's blunders, but maybe it will be too short." Capa: "I was thinking of writing <ZB's Good Moves> but it would be even shorter."
Jun-27-14  dernier thylacine: It seems that 44.g4 gives an immediately mortal force to the black pawns majority, whereas only a waiting move like 44.Bb6!? would have allowed a tough resistance. Maybe I am wrong, because even I use a computer to check in short time the value of my intuition in clear endgames positions like this one, I still am just a patzer!...
Sep-09-16  SimplicityRichard: Marshall the great tactician, out-manoeuvres Capablanca in an endgame. A splendid show that demonstrates just how good a Chess Master Marshall was.#
May-08-17  Sally Simpson: For the record, this game was adjourned on move 32 with Marshall sealing 32...Qf5. It was continued two days later.

(game 81 'My 50 Years of Chess' by Frank Marshall, through there are claims that it was ghost written by Fred Reinfeld.)

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

May-09-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: Looking at the position after 41...Ke6


click for larger view

It's hard for me to see how Capablanca could possibly lose this game. Indeed, Stockfish 8 at d=34 evaluates the position at [+5.02], winning for White, after Capablanca's 41.c4. Stockfish indicates that Capablanca should have played d5 sooner, say after 41...bxc4+ 42.bxc4 g5. In that case Stockfish evaluates the position after 44.d5 at [+13.83], d=35, even more clearly winning. And it considers 44.g4 winning equally easily, evaluating it at [+13.56].

I guess the game was played when Marshall was still Marshall and Capablanca was not yet Capablanca.

May-10-17  Sally Simpson: Hi AlyerKupp,

"I guess the game was played when Marshall was still Marshall and Capablanca was not yet Capablanca."

I think Capablanca was Capablanca then, four years previously in 1909 Capa beat Marshall 8-1 with 14 draws.

May-10-17  beatgiant: <AylerKupp>
Your diagram is missing Black's d-pawn. Did you use that setup to run your evals?
May-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <Sally Simpson> Yes, of course Capablanca was Capablanca then. Marshall was a little bit older (by 11 years) so my comment was a play on Tal's comment associated with his early 4-0 advantage against Fischer in classical time control games prior to 1960: "That was when Tal was still Tal and Fischer was not yet Fischer."
May-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <beatgiant> Ha, ha, ha! How careless of me. Yes, I used that set up to run my evals; I should have been more careful. No wonder Stockfish found it so easy to play an early d4-d5!

But my original comment still stands, although obviously not quite so convincingly; with Black's pawn on d5 Stockfish 8 evaluates the position at [0.00], d=54, after 42.c4. A likely draw, but certainly not a likely loss.

May-10-17  beatgiant: <AylerKupp>
<Tal's comment>, in turn, was probably a riff on the famous apocryphal comment on the Steinitz-Zukertort matches "Zukertort was not yet Zukertort in 1872, but Zukertort was no longer Zukertort in 1886"
May-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <beatgiant> Zukertort never really was Zukertort

So, who was Zukertort?

*****

May-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <beatgiant> I didn't know that! Thanks.
May-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <morfishine> He was a chess-playing baker. A famous French dessert, torte de sucre or sucre torte (sugar tart) was named after him.
May-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <beatgiant> And I'll be you didn't know THAT! :-)
Jun-30-17  sudoplatov: Who's Zukertort?
Get me Zukertort?
Get me a Zukertort typer?
Who's Zukertort?
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