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Robert Eugene Byrne vs Robert James Fischer
"The Brilliancy Prize" (game of the day Mar-09-2017)
US Championship (1963/64), New York, NY USA, rd 3, Dec-18
King's Indian Defense: Fianchetto Variation. Immediate Fianchetto (E60)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 22 OF 22 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-01-17  Mithrain: 12 ... e5 shows how well Fischer understood the dynamics of the position (seriously weakening the d5-pawn but gaining a lot of play with his minor pieces).
Jul-06-17  The Kings Domain: Poor Byrne brothers, the whipping boys of ol' Bobby.

Fischer's smooth escalating type of victory is perhaps unmatched in the game. His brilliancies are usually simple but there's a magic to them that can be awe-inspiring.

Jul-06-17  Petrosianic: <The Kings Domain: Poor Byrne brothers, the whipping boys of ol' Bobby.>

Actually, Robert was maybe Bobby's toughest US opponent after Reshevsky. You need to study more than just one game.

Sep-02-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Video analysis of this game: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHy....
Jan-13-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  CheckMateEndsTheGame: On move 14. Why not just play f3?
Jan-14-18  GT3RS: Fischer was built in a lab.

A brilliant and underrated short game. Bryne made no obvious error leading up to the fatal queen move or should I say rook move.

From what I've read there was a lengthy analytic artillery exchange via articles in chess publications afterward as Soviet analysts sought to diminish the result by showing Bryne's win with the other move and Fischer responding with analysis to show a plausible draw.

Jan-15-18  Petrosianic: <GT3RS: Fischer was built in a lab.

A brilliant and underrated short game.>

Underrated? You've got to be kidding me, Pyle. This is the one that everyone raves about.

Jan-22-18  scottpi: Why Didn't Byrne play 21. Nf3? What was Fischer's reply to that?
Jan-22-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <scottpi: Why Didn't Byrne play 21. Nf3? What was Fischer's reply to that?>

Fischer was planning to take the cyanide pill in his signet ring if white played 21. Nf3.

Either that or Bxf3+ 22. Kxf3 Qf6+ followed by Qxc3. That only wins back the piece and leaves Fischer a pawn up, so there's probably better, but I don't see it.

Jan-22-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gregor Samsa Mendel: <scottpi: Why Didn't Byrne play 21. Nf3? What was Fischer's reply to that?>

21..Qxd2+ 22 Rxd2 Bxc3 and black will be up the exchange and a pawn.

Jan-23-18  Granny O Doul: And winning more material still with ...Re3 coming up after gathering the exchange.
Jan-23-18  Howard: Yes, Fischer could hardly have overlooked 21.Nf3 in his calculations. You just "know" that that move would not have worked for White or even come close---otherwise, Fischer would have acknowledged the move in his book.
Jan-30-18  yurikvelo: https://pastebin.com/kqfHg5Qt

multiPV

Feb-09-18  Artemio: It's a Gruenfeld similar to his game with the other Byrne (Donald)...
Apr-13-18  Justin796: There's a Herbert James Fischer in the 1700s who supposedly won every game with the black pieces, and never won with the White pieces except on Wednesday, 1776!
May-26-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Has anyone ever seen this game annotated anywhere without the final quip about the grandmasters in the other room?
May-26-18  Retireborn: <offramp> I don't think I even know who these two(?) grandmasters were, although I have seen Rossolimo named as one.
May-26-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <This dazzling move came as the shocker... the culminating combination is of such depth that, even at the very moment at which I resigned, both grandmasters who were commenting on the play for the spectators in a separate room believed I had a won game! -- Robert Byrne>

The commentators were not Fischer or Robert Byrne. I suppose it was Reshevsky and Kashdan... what other US grandmasters were there?

And how many spectators were there? December 18th, 1963 in New York's deep midwinter - who would come along to see a chess game?

I would imagine a dozen or so spectators and two chess masters, and the masters are being paid five nickels an hour, and the spectators aren't sure how knights move....

May-26-18  Howard: Soltis mentions who those other two grandmasters/commenters were, and I do recall that one of them was indeed Rossolimo. But I'll be darned if I can recall the other one. Just consult that book, though.
May-26-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Soltis only names Rossolimo as does The Chess Review from February. Other sources. The Mammoth Book of Chess and Wade and O'Connell's book only refer to the analysts as other 'Grandmasters.'.

And how many spectators were there?

Chess Review say 200+ turned up for the Fischer - Reshevsky game and more than that for Round 7 game Fischer v Addison.

May-26-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: I can imagine those 200 spectators.

Half of them dressed in Fischer's away kit, and the Reshevskyites dressed as accountants.

Fireworks being sporadically let off. Guys urinating in the guy in front's pocket. Vuvuzelas blasting Fischer's eardrums.

And then, during long pauses in the game, the dreaded Mexican Wave.

Nov-05-18  PJs Studio: This game was an amazing inspiration to me as a youngster. Fischer’s 18...Nxg2!! was the first glimps I had at the depths of calculation needed to win chess games against experts and masters. One of the greatest combos in history.

The only real question about this game... does 18...Ng2 deserve two exclamation marks, or three?

Nov-30-18  mikealando: In response to earlier queries <why didn't white play 21.Nf3?> Answer: 21.Nf3 leaves white a piece down after 21...Qxd2+ 22.Rxd2 Bxc3 23.Rad1 Bxd2 24.Rxd2 Re3 25.Rf2 Rd8 26.Bc1 Rc3 27.Bg5 Rdd3 and the knight will go. Did Fischer see this far? I'm sure he did, and so did Byrne.
Nov-30-18  PJs Studio: As to the GM’s in the other room commenting on the game? David Levy in his book “How Fischer Plays Chess” points out that Byrne thought there were GMs commentating on the game but they were US senior masters.

The masters did claim it was “madness” for Byrne to resign. Levy also pointed out that Byrne thought for a long time before resigning. Byrne was a great player in those days. He knew full well he had run into a buzzsaw.

Dec-01-18  Howard: Rossolimo was one of the commentators, according to Soltis.
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