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Robert James Fischer vs Boris Spassky
Fischer - Spassky World Championship Match (1972), Reykjavik ISL, rd 4, Jul-18
Sicilian Defense: Fischer-Sozin Attack. Leonhardt Variation (B88)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Jul-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <Howard: Incidentally, the number "19" (which apparently refers to Fischer's long winning streak, extending back to the 1970 interzonal) has sometimes been the subject of disagreement. Does that include Fischer's forfeit win over Panno, for example? Not only that, weren't 1-2 of Fischer's games near the end of the event played out of order, for some reason?

Some sources say it's "20". But, then, it hardly makes any difference, anyway.>

The win streak was 20 games.

Last round of the Interzonal,
Panno resigned after Fischer's 1.c4.

I say "19" so I don't have to listen to the knee jerk response from Fischer haters, who pretend you are trying to pull a fast one, because one wasn't a fully played game.

<weren't 1-2 of Fischer's games near the end of the event played out of order, for some reason>

Maybe you're thinking of Sousse 1967?

Jul-07-16  Petrosianic: This was a particularly painful one, as it put Fischer's favorite 6. Bc4 variation on the shelf permanently.
Jul-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <Petrosianic: This was a particularly painful one, as it put Fischer's favorite 6. Bc4 variation on the shelf permanently.>

It was so devastating and painful,
Fischer could only manage 3 wins
and a draw out of the next 4 games.

He was basically shattered.

Jul-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Howard> Could someone please supply some engine analysis to 31...Rh4? How close would it have come to winning ?> (part 1 of 2)

I did an analysis using 3 engines and each of them considered 32.g4 as White's best move, cutting off the Rh4. Since the Ph3 can be reinforced by Bc4-f1, it doesn't look to me like Black's Rh4 has any prospects and it will require several tempi to be brought back into action. But all 3 engines consider Black's position to be better in spite of his pawn deficit, but with BOC whether the perceived advantage is enough to win is another matter.

Here is the top line from each of the 3 engines from the following position:


click for larger view

<Komodo 10>: [-0.72], d=33: 32.g4 Bd6 33.Qg2 Qe3 34.Rd3 Qc1+ 35.Qg1 Qxc2 36.b3 Bf4 37.a4 Kh6 38.Qg2 Qb1+ 39.Qg1 Qxd3 40.Bxd3 Rxh3+ 41.Kg2 Rg3+ 42.Kf2 Rxg1 43.Kxg1 (now it's White who has the pawn deficit) 43...Kg7 44.Kf2 Kf6 45.Kf3 Ke5 46.Bb5 Kd4 47.Be8 f6 48.Bd7 e5 49.Bf5 Bd2 50.Ke2 Bb4 51.Kf3 Be7 52.Ke2 Bc5 53.Kf3 Bb4 54.Ke2


click for larger view

And I don't see how Black can make progress.

<Stockfish 7>: [-0.70], d=41: 32.g4 Bd6 33.Qg2 Qe3 34.Rd3 Qc1+ 35.Qg1 Qxc2 36.Qd4+ (here Stockfish deviates from Komodo, taking a completely different approach by exchanging off the BOC) 36...Kg6 37.Qxd6 Qxc4 38.Kg2 Qc2+ 39.Kf1 Qc1+ 40.Rd1 Qxb2 (once again it's now White that has the pawn deficit, at least temporarily) 41.Qd3+ Kg7 42.Qe3 Qf6+ 43.Kg2 Rh8 44.Rf1 Qe7 45.Rf5 f6 46.Rxa5 Qb7+ 47.Qf3 Qb2+ (a surprising decision, 47...Qxf3+ 48.Kxf3 Rxh3+ leaves Black a pawn up and, once White's a-pawn advances, will allow Black to get behind the rook pawn. Then Black might have some winning chances with his k-side pawn majority) 48.Qf2 Qc3 49.Ra7+ Kg6 50.Qf3 Qxf3+ (so Stockfish finally sees it my way :-) 51.Kxf3 Rxh3+ 52.Kg2 Rb3 53.Ra6 Kf7 54.Ra7+ Ke8 55.a4 Rb4 (now I see that "we" overestimated Black's winning chances, after 55...Ra3 56.Kf2 f5 (otherwise White just moves back and forth between f2 and g2) 57.gxf5 exf5 58.Ra5 and the position is a tablebase draw) 56.Kg3 f5 57.gxf5 exf5 (and this similar position is also a tablebase draw) 58.Kf2 Rf4+ 59.Kg3 Rd4 60.Kg2 Rg4+ 61.Kh3 Rc4 62.Ra5 Rf4 63.Ra7 Kf8 64.Kg2 Rg4+ 65.Kf3 Rd4 66.Kg3 (66.Kg2, as he played earlier, would have been a draw by repetition) 66... Rd3+ 67.Kg2 g4 68.Rc7 Ke8 69.a5 Ra3 70.Rc5


click for larger view

And this position is also a tablebase draw.

Jul-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Howard> Could someone please supply some engine analysis to 31...Rh4? How close would it have come to winning ?> (part 2 of 2)

<Houdini 4>: [-0.56], d=31: 32.g4 Bd6 33.Qg2 Qe3 34.Rd3 Qc1+ 35.Qg1 Qxc2 36.Qd4+ Kg6 37.Qxd6 (Houdini follows Stockfish's approach and exchanges bishops) 37...Qxc4 38.Kg2 Qc2+ 39.Kf1 Qc1+ 40.Rd1 Qxb2 41.Qd3+ Kg7 42.Qe3 Qf6+ 43.Kg2 Rh8 44.Rf1 Qe7 45.Rf5 f6 46.Rxa5 Qb7+ 47.Kf2 (here Houdini deviates from Stockfish's 47.Qf3, and its continuation is quite different) 47...Qb2+ 48.Kg3 Rc8 49.Rc5 Qb8+ 50.Kg2 Rd8 (Houdini as Black plays much more actively with its rook than Stockfish) 51.Rc2 Qb7+ 52.Kf2 e5 53.Rd2 Ra8 54.Qc5 Ra4 55.Rd3 Re4 56.Kg3 Re2 57.Rf3 Rd2 58.Qb4 Qxb4 59.axb4 Rb2 60.b5 Rxb5 61.Ra3 (White is a pawn down but with all the pawns on the same side a draw is the most likely outcome) 51...Kg6 62.Kf3 Rb4 63.Ke3 Rc4


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Still looks like a draw to me. Unfortunately the 8 remaining pieces is one too many for the Lomonosov tablebases, and the FinalGen tablebase generator estimates that it will require about 300 hours and 1 TB uncompressed disk space to reach a conclusion, and I have neither the patience nor the disk space to use it.

So, restarting the analysis from this position, Houdini evaluates the resulting position at [-0.49], d=41 after either 64.Rd3, 64.Kf3, or 64.Rb3. Here is the 63.Rb3 line, arbitrarily picked, for completeness: 64.Rb3 Kf7 65.Rb7+ Ke6 66.Rb6+ Ke7 67.Rb3 (67.Rb7+ would likely lead to a draw by repetition) 67...Kd6 68.Rd3+ (likewise 68.Rb6+ since anything other than 68...Ke7 leads to the loss of the Pf6, and 67...Kd4 68.Rxf7 Rc3+ 69.Kf2 Rxh3 is a tablebase draw) 68...Ke6 69.Ra3 Rc1 70.Ke4 Rh1 71.Ra6+ Kf7 72.Ra3 Kg6 73.Rc3 Re1+ 74.Kd5 Rd1+ 75.Ke4 Rd4+ 76.Ke3 Kf7 77.Ra3 Rc4 78.Kd3 Rc6 79.Ke3 Ke6 80.Ke4 Rc4+ 81.Ke3 Rc1


click for larger view

And, again, I don't see how Black can make any progress.

So with 31...Rh4, although Black retains the initiative and has some advantage, even going up a pawn on occasion, does not seem to provide Black with realistic winning chances, whether White exchanges the bishops (Stockfish, Houdini) or keeps the bishops (Komodo). Maybe that's why Timman's book only looks at it briefly.

Jul-07-16  RookFile: To prepare the little Qc3 trick like Fischer did in this game is defense at its best.
Jul-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: In the latter phase of this match in particular (games 14-20), Fischer demonstrated superb defensive skills, holding positions in which the merely elite players of the day may well have cracked under Spassky's assault.
Sep-27-16  edubueno: 25 Nxf7 is an interesting movement, but I think not in accordance with the position. 25... Kxf7; and according to white answer, the Black King finds the secure site in the black squares, e7 or h6.
Dec-29-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  pdxjjb: This is one of the most-analyzed games in chess history, and I can't pretend to have read most of the analysis. But after hours of analyzing this game with an engine (SF 8 popcnt on Mac), I have a couple of observations that many of the analysts I've read seem to have missed.

First, after the exchange of rooks on moves 20 and 21, black had the chance to choose from one of several attacking moves. Spassky chose 21 ... h4. Even at significant depth, the engine thinks this is maybe the fourth-best move, preferring Rd8 and especially Be3! by more than half a pawn (at depth = 34, 1 billion boards).

Second, the famous 29th move. Spassky's Rh8 might be the most-analyzed single move in chess history, with many commentators suggesting 29 ... Rd8! instead. The engine actually thinks Rd8 and Rh8 are pretty similar at great depth. Assuming Rd8, engines and human analysts agree that 30 c3 would have been Fischer's best (arguably, only) response.

Here is the interesting part: many human analysts seem to find it almost axiomatic that Spassky's next move should be 30 ... Rh8, but the engine does not agree. It prefers moves that maintain the pressure on the a7-g1 diagonal, either Bb6 or Qe3, with Qe3 being favored at depth = 32 (1 billion boards).

This and a few other observations leave me with the feeling that Spassky definitely had a winnable game after Fischer's weak retreat on move 19, but failed to find the sharpest tactical continuations on multiple occasions in the middle game.

Dec-29-17  Petrosianic: <diceman>: <Petrosianic: This was a particularly painful one, as it put Fischer's favorite 6. Bc4 variation on the shelf permanently.>

<It was so devastating and painful, Fischer could only manage 3 wins
and a draw out of the next 4 games.>

In other words, you concede the point that this game put one of Fischer's favorite lines on the shelf permanently. From your tone, anyone would have thought you were disagreeing.

We're not talking about Games 5-8. Try to concentrate.

Dec-30-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <pdxjjb: This is one of the most-analyzed games in chess history, and I can't pretend to have read most of the analysis... Second, the famous 29th move. Spassky's Rh8 might be the most-analyzed single move in chess history...>

First of all, <pdxjjb>, if that <is> your real name, I'd like to welcome you to one of the best sites on t'internet, and the best site for chess fans. I have been here many years and I have really enjoyed it. It is <actually> quite civilised! And going by that post I think you could be a major contributor.

However, I know this game well, but I've only ever seen it analysed here and in books about the 1972 match.

But I could be wrong! So you are going on my FAVOURITES List immediately so I can spot your future postings more easily.

Welcome! You will have a great time here!

Dec-30-17  ughaibu: <one of the best sites on t'internet>

I'd spell it "on't internet", but then again, I grew up as a dee-dah.

Jun-14-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Chess Nerd 'Did You Know' No. 285.

This is the cover of Purdy's book on the match.

https://www.redhotpawn.com/imgu/blo...

What game was being played when the picture was taken?

The chairs?

Fischer had White in the even numbered games.

This is either Game 4 or game 6 (Game 2 was the default) After game 6 Spassky sat in the same chair as Fischer.

https://www.redhotpawn.com/imgu/blo...

The position on the cover of the book is nigh impossible to make out but Spassky has a piece deep in Fischer's half of the board. It looks very much like this position.


click for larger view

Spassky never got a piece or a pawn beyond his 5th rank in game 6 (the 1.c4 game Fischer vs Spassky, 1972) So the picture is from game 4.

Aug-22-18  CharlesSullivan: <"There but for Fortune go I"> -- time for a little Schadenfreude...

PART 1: Timman's Moment of Schadenfreude

Timman (on page 73 of the 2009 edition of <Fischer World Champion!>), points out that had Spassky gone for the win in a different way with 27...Rd8 28.Nxf7 Rxd1+ 29.Qxd1 Qg3 (threatening mate-in-one), then 30.Nh6+ seems to save White:


click for larger view

As Timman writes: < "All (!) commentators thought that White had a perpetual check here -- all except Donner, who after initially making the same mistake, discovered that Black gets mated after 30...♔g7 31.♕d7+." > The rest of the mate is 31...Kh8 32.Qe8+ Kg7 33.Qf7+ Kxh6 34.Qxe6+ Kh5 35.Qe8+ Kh6 36.Qf8+ Kg6 37.Bd3+ Be4 38.Bxe4+ Kh5 39.Qh8#.

PART 2: Our Moment of Schadenfreude

Timman thought that Black's best try for a win after 27...Rd8 28.Nxf7 Rxd1+ 29.Qxd1 was < "29...♕e4! 30.♗f1 ♔xf7 31.♕d7+ ♔f6 32.♕d8+ ♔e5 33.♕e7, and despite everything, Black cannot avoid a draw." >
Timman makes not one, but two analytical blunders.

First, in this position (after 29...Qe4),


click for larger view

the correct drawing line is either 30.Qf1 or Smyslov's 30.Nh6+ Kg7 31.Qf1 when Black cannot take the knight without having his queen skewered (31...Kxh6?? 32.Qf8+ Kh5 33.Qh8+ Kg6 34.Bd3).
Instead, Timman's 30.Bf1?? loses to 30...Qh4!!


click for larger view

and the threats against White's king force at least a winning endgame; for example, 31.Qd8+ Kg7 32.Qh8+ Qxh8 33.Nxh8 Be4 34.Bc4 Bxc2 35.Bxe6 Kxh8, etc.

Second, at the end of Timman's dismal variation (after 32...Ke5),


click for larger view

Gligoric chose the sensible 33.Qc7+ and perpetual check, but Timman's 33.Qe7 [let's hope this was a typo!] gets busted by 33...Qf5!! followed by something like 34.Qc7+ Kf6 35.Qc3+ e5 36.Qxe3 Qxf1+ 37.Qg1 Bxg2+ 38.Kh2 Qxg1+ 39.Kxg1 Bxh3


click for larger view

and Black has most certainly avoided a draw!

Aug-22-18  Howard: Keep it comin', Mr. Sullivan !!!
Aug-28-18  CharlesSullivan: Spassky missed wins THREE times in this game. To be fair, commentators have hardly been better than Spassky at finding the wins. Only now, with the advent of extremely powerful hardware and software, can we unravel some of the complexities of this game.

1. First Missed Win

After Fischer played the weak 19.Qe2 (19.Qg3! equalizes), Spassky had his first chance to win here, at move 21:


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21...Be3 22.Nd4
[ Even worse seems to be 22.Nd6 Bc6 <<-2.18> 23.Nc4 Bf4 24.Nd2 Bxe5 25.Nf3 Bxf3 26.Qxf3 a4 27.Ba2 Bxb2 28.Bc4 Qc5 29.Qd3 Bxa3, etc. ]
22...Qxe5 23.Nf3 Qf4 <-1.61>. After a 26-hour search to depth 61, the best that Stockfish 9 can find for White is 24.c3 Rb8 25.Bc2 Bd5 26.Rf1 Bc5 27.Ne5 Qe3 28.Qxe3 Bxe3 <-1.83, depth=64> 29.Nd3 f5 30.Re1 Bg5 31.Kg1 Bf6 <-2.07> 32.Kf1 Kf7 <-2.30> 33.g3 g6 34.Kf2 g5 <-2.70> 35.h3 h5 36.Rc1 h4 <-3.00> 37.gxh4 gxh4 <-3.77> 38.Re1 Bc4 39.Kf3 Rg8 40.Kf2 Rd8 41.Rd1 Rb8. Now begins an interesting king march: 42.Ke3 Bg5+ 43.Kd4 Ba6 <-4.71> 44.Ke5 Rb5+ 45.Kd6 Rd5+ 46.Kc6 Be3 47.Ne1 Bb5+ 48.Kc7 Rc5+ 49.Kb7 Ke7 <-6.94> 50.Rd3 Bc6+ 51.Ka6:


click for larger view

White has managed to maintain material equality, but his position is hopeless, as this neat finish shows: 51...f4 52.Rd1 Rg5 53.a4 f3 54.Nd3 f2 and the threat of 55...Rg1 forces 55.Nxf2 Bxf2 -- Black has won a piece and the game.

2. Second Missed Win

Fischer then missed a chance for complete equality at move 24 (24.Ne4! instead of 24.h3) and then landed in a definitely lost game after 25.Qg4 (25.Bd3 might salvage the game for White). At Black's 27th move,


click for larger view

nobody seems to have noticed that 27...Bf4 leads to a win. Using Stockfish 9, Black's backed up score is <-2.42>: 28.Bd3 Qxb2 29.Qh5 Qg7 30.Nc4 Bc7 31.Nd2 Rc8 32.Kg1 Bf4 33.Kf1 Bd5 34.Qe2 Kf8 35.Nf3 Qf6 36.Qf2 Bd6 37.a4 Qf4 38.Qd4 Ke7 <-2.81> 39.Qa7+ Rc7 40.Qd4 Bd4 41.Qxf4 gxf4 <-3.23> 42.h4 Rc8 43.Kf2 Bc6 44.h5 Bxa4 45.h6 Bxc2 46.Rc1 Bc5+ 47.Ke2 Bxd3+ 48.Kxd3 Rd8+ 49.Ke4 Bd6 <-4.11>:


click for larger view

With two extra pawns, Black wins easily enough from the above position.

Aug-28-18  CharlesSullivan: 3. Third Missed Win

As Timman pointed out (in Fischer World Champion!), Fischer should have played 28.b4!! axb4 29.axb4 Bxb4 and now 30.Bf1! (instead of Timman's 30.Be2) would have allowed White to hold the position. But Fischer actually played 28.Nb5 which led to 28...Kg7 29.Nd4 and this:


click for larger view

Nobody has correctly demonstrated the win which begins 29...Rd8 30.c3 Qe3 (found by Donner). Best play is 31.b4 axb4 32.axb4 Bb6 33.b5 Be4 34.Bxe6 Bxd4 35.Rxd4 Rxd4 36.cxd4 fxe6 when Black will win this unbalanced ending of Q+B+2P vs. Q+4P. Timman thought that White could actually survive after 29...Rd8 30.c3 Qe3 with 31.Be2 Bxd4 32.Rxd4 f5 33.Qh5:


click for larger view

But Stockfish 9 quickly finds 33...Bd5! (instead of Timman's 33...Rxd4, which is equal). The threat to trap White's queen with 34...Rh8 is simply too strong; for example, 34.Rd3 Qf4 35.Rd4?! Qg3 36.Bf1?! Rh8 37.Qe2 Rxh3+! 38.Kg1 Qh2+ 39.Kf2 Rf3+!! wins:


click for larger view

A possible finish is 40.Ke1 Qg3+ 41.Kd1 Bb3+ 42.Kc1 Rf2 43.Qd3 and mate in 13 begins 43...Qe5 44.g3 Qe1+ 45.Qd1 Qe3+ 46.Kb1 Bxd1, etc.

Aug-28-18  Howard: Wow! Those silicon monsters are really somethin'.
Aug-28-18  Howard: Remind me to dig out my copy of Timman's TAOCA, and see what all he'd overlooked.
Sep-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Remind me to turn off the kettle. It is boiling away like crazy.
Sep-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Timman's <Art of Chess Analysis> remains a classic, regardless of the naysaying computer's finds.
Sep-04-18  Howard: Yes, it is certainly a very worthwhile book, even if numerous improvements have been uncovered since it came out.
Sep-14-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  jonjoseph: Is there something unnatural about such analysis in depth ? Almost against nature or against Chess. I enjoy the question marks about turning points in the game .Sadly for the computers they have no feelings of disaster or beauty as in the criss cross queen move to save the bishop Queen attack . But this site is as wonderful as the game itself . Where does the vague , uncalculated emotional effect of game situations fit in ? My second attempt at Kibitzing.
Sep-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <Petrosianic:

<diceman>: <Petrosianic: This was a particularly painful one, as it put Fischer's favorite 6. Bc4 variation on the shelf permanently.>

<It was so devastating and painful, Fischer could only manage 3 wins and a draw out of the next 4 games.>

In other words, you concede the point that this game put one of Fischer's favorite lines on the shelf permanently.>

Your "point" is irrelevant, as it pretends this was the only weapon Fischer had for a win.

<We're not talking about Games 5-8.>

You certainly aren't, because it destroys your make believe.

Sep-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <jonjoseph:

Is there something unnatural about such analysis in depth ? Almost against nature or against Chess.>

I think you have to look at it this way.

1. There is a "real" world, then there is the world of "truth."

2. There are different types/levels of "blunders." All "blunders" are not created equally.

3. It's a great credit to Fischer/Spassky that top Grandmasters, away from the tension of the actual struggle, with many days/hours for analysis, have been unable to find the "truth" in many of these positions.

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